European Collection

Detail of arm, inset crystal and fine enamel work on left side of arm.
Reliquary Arm
Reliquary Arm
Detail of arm, inset crystal and fine enamel work on left side of arm.

Reliquary Arm

French
12th century
c. 1150–1200 (crystal possibly added in the 15th century)
Silver, champlevé enamel on copper, gilt bronze, wood core, glass cabochons, and crystal
24 7/16 x 6 x 3 7/8 in. (62.1 x 15.3 x 9.9 cm)
AP 1979.25
The veneration of the physical remains of saints––or objects with which they had come into contact—began to be practiced during the Early Christian era. In A.D. 393, the Church decreed that every altar must have a relic.
Reliquary Casket is a reliquary made of Champlevé enamel on copper, wood core. The casket, with its gabled roof and cresting, recalls not only a tomb, but a cathedral.
Reliquary Casket
Reliquary Casket
Reliquary Casket is a reliquary made of Champlevé enamel on copper, wood core. The casket, with its gabled roof and cresting, recalls not only a tomb, but a cathedral.

Reliquary Casket

French
13th century
c. 1200–1220
Champlevé enamel on copper, wood core
8 7/8 x 9 1/2 x 4 1/8 in. (22.6 x 24.2 x 10.5 cm)
AP 1979.26
A major center of the manufacture and export of exquisitely crafted reliquaries in the Middle Ages was Limoges, located in southwestern France along several ecclesiastical and pilgrimage routes.
Miniature Casket is a reliquary made of Champlevé enamel on copper. It features features scrolling vines with fleurons on all four sides and lozenge patterns on the pitched roof.
Miniature Casket
Miniature Casket
Miniature Casket is a reliquary made of Champlevé enamel on copper. It features features scrolling vines with fleurons on all four sides and lozenge patterns on the pitched roof.

Miniature Casket

French
13th century
c. 1250–1300
Champlevé enamel on copper
3 9/16 x 3 1/16 x 1 5/8 in. (9 x 7.7 x 4.2 cm)
AP 1979.27
The enameled decoration of this fine casket, produced in Limoges, features scrolling vines with fleurons on all four sides and lozenge patterns on the pitched roof.
The Barnabas Altarpiece is a three paneled altarpiece made of Tempera, oil, and gold on panel. It depicts the crowned, enthroned Virgin nursing the infant Christ with Saints Peter and Paul on either side of her.
The Barnabas Altarpiece
The Barnabas Altarpiece
The Barnabas Altarpiece is a three paneled altarpiece made of Tempera, oil, and gold on panel. It depicts the crowned, enthroned Virgin nursing the infant Christ with Saints Peter and Paul on either side of her.

The Barnabas Altarpiece

Southwestern French or Northern Spanish (?)
(13–14th century)
Southwestern French or Northern Spanish (?), 13–14th century
c. 1275–1350
Tempera, oil, and gold on panel
Left: 35 13/16 x 14 3/8 in. (91 x 36.5 cm) Center: 35 13/16 x 22 7/16 in. (91 x 57 cm) Right: 35 13/16 x 14 9/16 in. (91 x 37 cm) Framed: 41 7/8 x 60 1/4 x 2 1/4 in. (106.4 x 153 x 5.7 cm)
AP 1969.06 a,b,c
These three panels are fragments of a once-larger ensemble, which has been named The Barnabas Altarpiece because of the inscriptions on its lower border alluding to an unidentified Bishop Barnabas.
The Raising of Lazarus shows the moment when Jesus called Lazarus forth from the tomb in tempera and gold on panel
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus shows the moment when Jesus called Lazarus forth from the tomb in tempera and gold on panel

The Raising of Lazarus

Duccio di Buoninsegna
Italian (active 1278–1318)
14th century
1310–11
Tempera and gold on panel
17 1/8 x 18 1/4 in. (43.5 x 46.4 cm) Framed: 20 7/8 x 22 1/8 x 1 7/8 in. (53 x 56.2 x 4.8 cm)
APx 1975.01
Duccio was the preeminent Sienese painter in the early years of the fourteenth century. He infused the prevailing Byzantine style with a more naturalistic, narrative mode.
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish is a wide earthenware jar with a wise mouth and very small handles on the side
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish is a wide earthenware jar with a wise mouth and very small handles on the side

Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish

Italian
15th century
c. 1425–50
Tin-glazed earthenware
7 3/4 x 8 x 7 in. (19.7 x 20.3 x 17.8 cm)
AP 1979.06
This type of earthenware has a tin-glazed, opaque white surface that provides an excellent ground for pictorial decoration.
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs is a blue and white earthenware jar with small handles and a wide mouth
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs is a blue and white earthenware jar with small handles and a wide mouth

Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs

Italian
15th century
c. 1425–50
Tin-glazed earthenware
9 x 9 x 8 in. (22.8 x 22.8 x 20.3 cm)
AP 1979.07
This type of earthenware has a tin-glazed, opaque white surface that provides an excellent ground for pictorial decoration.
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes is made of tempera and gold on panel. Notable is the use of pure pigments, such as vermilion and lapis lazuli and gilded decorative borders of the drapery
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes is made of tempera and gold on panel. Notable is the use of pure pigments, such as vermilion and lapis lazuli and gilded decorative borders of the drapery

The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

Fra Angelico (Fra Giovanni da Fiesole)
Italian (c. 1395/1400–1455)
15th century
c. 1426–29
Tempera and gold on panel
10 9/16 x 9 3/8 in. (26.8 x 23.8 cm) Framed: 18 5/8 x 17 7/16 in. (47.3 x 44.3 cm)
AP 1986.03
Born Guido di Piero, the artist known as Fra Angelico acquired his nickname not long after his death, when he was referred to as “Angelicus” by a fellow Dominican monk for his pious life and artworks.
Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif is a narrow cylindrical earthenware which has been decorated and covered in tin glaze
Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif
Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif
Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif is a narrow cylindrical earthenware which has been decorated and covered in tin glaze

Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif

Italian
15th century
c. 1450–1500
Tin-glazed earthenware
12 5/8 x 5 3/8 in. (32 x 13.6 cm)
AP 1979.10
By the late fifteenth century, polychrome wares had replaced the more limited palette of Severe-style majolica, adding new shades of gold and green. Plant forms predominated, particularly an elegantly scrolled “Gothic-floral” leaf.
Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif is a two-handled earthenware jar decorated with elegant patterns and a plant motif
Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif
Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif
Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif is a two-handled earthenware jar decorated with elegant patterns and a plant motif

Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif

Italian
15th century
c. 1450–75
Tin-glazed earthenware
8 1/8 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (20.6 x 19 x 14 cm)
AP 1979.08
By the late fifteenth century, polychrome wares had replaced the more limited palette of Severe-style majolica, adding new shades of gold and green.
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna) is a terracotta relief of the Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna) is a terracotta relief of the Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Attributed to Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi)
Italian (1386/87–1466)
15th century
c. 1450
Terracotta
32 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (83.5 x 52.1 cm)
AP 2006.01
Celebrated for his powers of invention, range of expression, and technical prowess, Donatello was the preeminent Italian sculptor of the fifteenth century.
The Madonna and Child is a half-length devotional painting of the Madonna and Child. Bellini’s Madonna stands behind a veined marble parapet, in front of a cloth of honor brocaded with pomegranates to symbolize the Resurrection.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child is a half-length devotional painting of the Madonna and Child. Bellini’s Madonna stands behind a veined marble parapet, in front of a cloth of honor brocaded with pomegranates to symbolize the Resurrection.

The Madonna and Child

Giovanni Bellini
Italian (c. 1438–1516)
15th century
c. 1465
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
32 1/2 x 23 in. (82.5 x 58.4 cm) Framed: 48 x 39 1/8 x 5 in. (121.9 x 99.4 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1971.06
Giovanni Bellini’s half-length devotional paintings of the Madonna and Child enjoyed great popularity in Venice, and later in his career he employed a large workshop to meet the demand.
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist is a devotional painting which places Madonna and Child in the center of the composition
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist is a devotional painting which places Madonna and Child in the center of the composition

The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

Andrea Mantegna
Italian (c. 1430/31–1506)
15th century
c. 1485–88
Distemper, oil, and gold on canvas
24 3/4 x 20 3/16 in. (62.9 x 51.3 cm) Framed: 32 3/8 x 28 3/8 x 3 in. (82.2 x 72.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1987.04
Trained in the humanist university town of Padua, Andrea Mantegna developed a lifelong passion for antiquity that profoundly informed his work as an artist.
Portia and Brutus is a panel in a series by Ercole de’ Roberti of virtuous women. In the painting, Portia shows Brutus a self-inflicted wound  to confirm that she would be ready to endure death
Portia and Brutus
Portia and Brutus
Portia and Brutus is a panel in a series by Ercole de’ Roberti of virtuous women. In the painting, Portia shows Brutus a self-inflicted wound  to confirm that she would be ready to endure death

Portia and Brutus

Ercole de’ Roberti
Italian (c. 1455/56–1496)
15th century
c. 1486–90
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
19 3/16 x 13 1/2 in. (48.7 x 34.3 cm) Framed: 25 3/4 x 20 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (65.4 x 52.1 x 5.7 cm)
AP 1986.05
Ercole de’ Roberti spent the latter half of his career at the court of Ercole I d’Este, Duke of Ferrara, painting altarpieces, small devotional works, portraits, and fresco cycles for the Este residences, as well as decorative projects.
Her hair, the moon, and other details of the sculpture are gilded.
Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child
Her hair, the moon, and other details of the sculpture are gilded.

Virgin and Child

South Germany
15th century
15th century
1486
Silver, parcel-gilt, stones (opal, clear and pale sapphires, garnets, and pale emeralds)
21 × 6 3/4 × 6 3/4 in. (53.3 × 17.1 × 17.1 cm)
AP 2002.03
The subject of this rare example of Late Gothic church sculpture can be identified as the Virgin of the Apocalypse, whose imagery—the aureole of the sun, along with the twelve stars in her crown, and the crescent moon beneath her—is derived from the book of Revelation (12:1–5): “And there appeared a
The Torment of Saint Anthony depicts how the Egyptian hermit-saint, Saint Anthony, had a vision that he levitated into the air and was attacked by demons, whose torments he withstood. He also included a landscape that resembles the Arno River Valley around Florence.
The Torment of Saint Anthony
The Torment of Saint Anthony
The Torment of Saint Anthony depicts how the Egyptian hermit-saint, Saint Anthony, had a vision that he levitated into the air and was attacked by demons, whose torments he withstood. He also included a landscape that resembles the Arno River Valley around Florence.

The Torment of Saint Anthony

Michelangelo Buonarroti
Italian (1475–1564)
15th century
1487
Tempera on panel
18 1/2 x 13 3/4 in. (47 x 34.9 cm) Framed: 27 x 22 3/8 x 2 1/4 in. (68.6 x 56.8 x 5.7 cm)
AP 2009.01
This is the first known painting by Michelangelo, described by his earliest biographers and believed to have been painted when he was twelve or thirteen years old.

Pages