European Collection

The gilt Gothic inscription on this masterpiece of northern Renaissance portraiture identifies the sitter as Jacob Obrecht (1457/58–1505), a renowned choirmaster and one of the greatest composers of his age.
Jacob Obrecht
Jacob Obrecht
The gilt Gothic inscription on this masterpiece of northern Renaissance portraiture identifies the sitter as Jacob Obrecht (1457/58–1505), a renowned choirmaster and one of the greatest composers of his age.

Jacob Obrecht

Netherlandish or French
15th century
15th century
1496
Tempera, oil, and gold on panel
20 1/4 x 14 1/4 in. (51.4 x 36.2 cm)
AP 1993.02
The gilt Gothic inscription on this masterpiece of northern Renaissance portraiture identifies the sitter as Jacob Obrecht (1457/58–1505), a renowned choirmaster and one of the greatest composers of his age.
Albarello with Pine Cone Motif is a tin-glazed cylindrical earthenware vessel with a staggered design of pine cones derived from Persian palmettes.
Albarello with Pine Cone Motif
Albarello with Pine Cone Motif
Albarello with Pine Cone Motif is a tin-glazed cylindrical earthenware vessel with a staggered design of pine cones derived from Persian palmettes.

Albarello with Pine Cone Motif

Italian
15th century
c. 1500
Tin-glazed earthenware
12 1/4 x 5 1/2 in. (31.1 x 14 cm)
AP 1979.09
By the late fifteenth century, polychrome wares had replaced the more limited palette of Severe-style majolica, adding new shades of gold and green. Plant forms predominated, particularly an elegantly scrolled “Gothic-floral” leaf motif.
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the incarnation. The Resurrected Savior faces the worshiper with a level gaze. He raises his right hand in blessing, and with his left grips the bright red staff of the banner of the Resurrection.
Christ Blessing
Christ Blessing
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the incarnation. The Resurrected Savior faces the worshiper with a level gaze. He raises his right hand in blessing, and with his left grips the bright red staff of the banner of the Resurrection.

Christ Blessing

Giovanni Bellini
Italian (c. 1438–1516)
16th century
c. 1500
Tempera, oil, and gold on panel
23 1/4 x 18 1/2 in. (59 x 47 cm) Framed: 31 x 26 x 3 in. (78.7 x 66 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1967.07
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the central mystery of the Christian faith: the incarnation, when Christ––fully human and fully divine––was sent to earth to redeem humankind.
Christ the Redeemer is sculpted in mezzo rilievo. The profile view of Christ is deeply undercut, shows twisting tendrils and the crisp patterns of Christ’s beard set against the smooth surface of his skin.
Christ the Redeemer
Christ the Redeemer
Christ the Redeemer is sculpted in mezzo rilievo. The profile view of Christ is deeply undercut, shows twisting tendrils and the crisp patterns of Christ’s beard set against the smooth surface of his skin.

Christ the Redeemer

Attributed to Tullio Lombardo
Italian (c. 1455–1532)
16th century
c. 1500–1520
White marble relief
13 3/16 x 12 3/16 x 3 9/16 in. (33.5 x 31 x 9 cm)
AP 2005.04
This marble relief has recently been attributed to the Venetian sculptor Tullio Lombardo. Tullio was well versed in both ancient art and the work of contemporary artists outside Venice, such as Mantegna and Leonardo da Vinci.
 Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este is a terracotta bust of who we believe to be Marchioness of Mantua. It represents her in a highly flattering way, presenting an ideal, classicized “likeness."
Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este
Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este
 Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este is a terracotta bust of who we believe to be Marchioness of Mantua. It represents her in a highly flattering way, presenting an ideal, classicized “likeness."

Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este

Attributed to Gian Cristoforo Romano
Italian (c. 1465–1512)
16th century
c. 1500
Terracotta, formerly polychromed
21 3/8 x 21 1/2 in. (54.3 x 54.6 cm)
AP 2004.01
This rare terracotta portrait bust probably represents Isabella d’Este, Marchioness of Mantua. The most celebrated woman of her day, Isabella d’Este (1474–1539) cultivated one of the most illustrious courts in Renaissance Italy.
The Judgment of Paris depicts Paris tethering his horse and falling asleep after losing his way in a hunting expedition, at which Mercury appears in his dream and presents the three goddesses.
The Judgment of Paris
The Judgment of Paris
The Judgment of Paris depicts Paris tethering his horse and falling asleep after losing his way in a hunting expedition, at which Mercury appears in his dream and presents the three goddesses.

The Judgment of Paris

Lucas Cranach the Elder
German (1472–1553)
16th century
c. 1512–14
Oil on panel
16 15/16 x 12 11/16 in. (43 x 32.2 cm) Framed: 21 x 17 x 2 in. (53.3 x 43.2 x 5.1 cm)
AP 2004.03
This is the first of Cranach’s several versions of The Judgment of Paris. According to Greek and Roman mythology, the goddess of discord tossed an apple labeled “to the fairest” among the Olympian gods.
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda shows the sitter’s finely delineated features. The artist carefully renders the textures of the carpet, fur collar, buttons, and checkered black-and-gold doublet, creating an image of jewel-like intensity.
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda shows the sitter’s finely delineated features. The artist carefully renders the textures of the carpet, fur collar, buttons, and checkered black-and-gold doublet, creating an image of jewel-like intensity.

Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda

Jan Gossart, called Mabuse
Netherlandish (c. 1478–1532)
16th century
c. 1516–17
Oil on panel
22 1/2 x 18 1/16 in. (57.2 x 45.8 cm) Framed: 29 1/2 x 26 x 3 1/2 in. (74.9 x 66 x 8.9 cm)
AP 1979.30
Having accompanied his patron Philip of Burgundy to Rome in 1508–9, Jan Gossart was one of the first artists to disseminate the Italian style in the Low Countries. The subject of this portrait is Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda (1483–1538).
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.

Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope

Bambaia (Agostino Busti)
Italian (c. 1483–1548)
16th century
c. 1520–25
Marble
a: 23 13/16 x 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (60.5 x 24.2 x 19.3 cm) b: 26 3/16 x 12 3/8 x 6 1/2 in. (66.5 x 31.5 x 16.5 cm)
AP 1981.12 a,b
Agostino Busti, known as Bambaia, was an important Lombard sculptor, notable for his refined technique and innovative classicism.
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.

The Madonna and Child

Parmigianino (Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola)
Italian (1503–1540)
16th century
c. 1527–30
Oil on panel
17 5/8 x 13 3/8 in. (44.8 x 34 cm) Framed: 24 1/16 x 20 x 2 1/2 in. (61.1 x 50.8 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1995.09
Hailed as the new Raphael, Parmigianino was one of the most influential artists of the sixteenth century, cultivating a mannered gracefulness of pose and physiognomy, combined with new and dramatic coloristic effects, that transformed the classicism of his Renaissance predecessors.
Head of a Woman is a majestic head of an ideal beauty. He has emulated the smooth and abstracted facial structure found in classical sculpture
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman is a majestic head of an ideal beauty. He has emulated the smooth and abstracted facial structure found in classical sculpture

Head of a Woman

Sebastiano del Piombo (Sebastiano Luciani)
Italian (c. 1485–1547)
16th century
early 1530s
Oil on panel
10 in. diameter (25.4 cm diameter) Framed: 17 x 2 in. (43.2 x 5.1 cm)
AP 1985.08
Notable for the monumental grandeur of his religious paintings and portraits, Sebastiano del Piombo became the preeminent painter in Rome following Raphael’s death in 1520.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.

The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Italian (c. 1488–1576)
16th century
1530s
Oil on panel
41 1/2 x 58 3/8 in. (105.4 x 148.3 cm) Framed: 54 1/2 x 71 1/8 x 3 3/4 in. (138.4 x 180.7 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1986.07
More than any other Renaissance master, Titian was acclaimed—in his own lifetime and for centuries thereafter—for his expressive handling of paint and rich use of color. Like his teachers Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione, Titian set many of his religious subjects in a pastoral landscape.
The Supper at Emmaus is Bassano's oil painting depicting Christ’s miraculous appearance after the Resurrection. In the act of blessing and breaking bread at the inn, Christ, who is seated beneath a velvet green canopy, reveals himself to two of his disciples
The Supper at Emmaus
The Supper at Emmaus
The Supper at Emmaus is Bassano's oil painting depicting Christ’s miraculous appearance after the Resurrection. In the act of blessing and breaking bread at the inn, Christ, who is seated beneath a velvet green canopy, reveals himself to two of his disciples

The Supper at Emmaus

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
c. 1538
Oil on canvas
39 5/8 x 50 5/8 in. (100.6 x 128.6 cm) Framed: 47 x 59 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (119.4 x 150.5 x 8.9 cm)
APx 1989.03
Jacopo Bassano was one of the most famous and influential masters of the late Renaissance in Italy, admired for his luminous color and sensitively observed incidents from everyday life.
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar is Bassano's oil portrait of a Franciscan Friar.  The skull at the bottom right of the composition is a reminder of the vanity of earthly life, supports the contemplative aspect of the friar’s piety. A pen holder hangs from the rope at his waist, while his left hand is held up in a gesture of benediction.
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar is Bassano's oil portrait of a Franciscan Friar.  The skull at the bottom right of the composition is a reminder of the vanity of earthly life, supports the contemplative aspect of the friar’s piety. A pen holder hangs from the rope at his waist, while his left hand is held up in a gesture of benediction.

Portrait of a Franciscan Friar

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
c. 1540–42
Oil on canvas
31 11/16 x 27 3/16 in. (80.5 x 69 cm) Framed: 48 3/4 x 44 3/4 x 3 5/8 in. (123.8 x 113.7 x 9.2 cm)
AP 1997.02
In this imposing portrait, Jacopo Bassano applies a vigorous and sharply focused naturalism to portray the distinctive features as well as the spiritual temperament and preoccupations of an unidentified Franciscan friar.
Saint John the Baptist is a statuette of the saint in which the left hand comes to the figure’s chest rather than being raised.
Saint John the Baptist
Saint John the Baptist
Saint John the Baptist is a statuette of the saint in which the left hand comes to the figure’s chest rather than being raised.

Saint John the Baptist

Italian (Florentine)
16th century
16th century
c. 1590
Gilt bronze
22 5/8 in. (57.5 cm)
AP 1999.01
Saint John the Baptist is the patron saint of Florence. This statuette may have adorned a baptismal font in one of the churches of that city. In style, it recalls the works of the fifteenth-century sculptor Michelozzo di Bartolomeo.
The Adoration of the Magi
The Adoration of the Magi

The Adoration of the Magi

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
after 1555
Oil on jasper
7 1/4 x 5 1/2 in. (18.4 x 14 cm) Framed: 12 3/4 x 11 x 1 5/8 in. (32.4 x 27.9 x 4.1 cm)
AG 1990.01
The subject of the Adoration of the Magi, along with the Adoration of the Shepherds, occupies pride of place in Jacopo Bassano’s repertory.
Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan
Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan

Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan

Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti)
Italian (1518–1594)
16th century
1567–70
Oil on canvas
49 5/8 x 41 15/16 in. (126 x 106.6 cm) Framed: 57 1/2 x 48 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. (146.1 x 123.8 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1986.08
A prolific master of religious and historical works, as well as portraits, Tintoretto developed a rapid, often impetuous manner of painting that was both expressive and expedient.

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