Asian Collection

Jar with Sculptural Rim
Jar with Sculptural Rim

Jar with Sculptural Rim

Japan
Jomon period (c. 10,500–300 B.C.)
2500–1000 B.C.
Low-fired clay
16 9/16 x 14 15/16 in. (42 x 38 cm)
APx 1974.03
Jomon, meaning “cord-marked,” refers to the impressions left from rolling braided or twisted ropes across the surface of moist clay vessels in the Neolithic period in Japan, which is thus known as the Jomon period.
Storage Jar
Storage Jar

Storage Jar

China, Gansu province, Yangshao culture
Neolithic period, Banshan phase (c. 2600–2300 B.C.)
c. 2500 B.C.
Low-fired earthenware painted with iron oxide and manganese pigments
H. 14 in. (35.6 cm); Diam. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm)
AG 1987.01
Large storage jars, painted with a free hand in imaginative geometric designs, are commonly found in Neolithic tombs in Gansu province, located in west China.
Storage Jar
Storage Jar

Storage Jar

China
Neolithic period, Machang phase (c. 7000–2000 B.C.)
c. 2200 B.C.
Low-fired clay with iron oxide and manganese pigments
H. 15 in. (38.1 cm); Diam. 16 in. (40.7 cm)
AP 1985.16
Large storage jars, painted with a free hand in imaginative geometric designs, are commonly found in Neolithic tombs in Gansu province, located in west China.
Female Figurine
Female Figurine

Female Figurine

Japan
Jomon period (c. 10,500–300 B.C.)
c. 1000–200 B.C.
Low-fired clay
7 15/16 x 5 1/8 x 2 3/8 in. (20.1 x 13 x 6 cm)
AP 1971.15
Jomon, meaning “cord-marked,” refers to the impressions left from rolling twisted rope across the surface of moist clay. The purpose of Jomon figurines is not known, but they may have been used as protective charms or fertility symbols.
Nao Bell
Nao Bell

Nao Bell

China, possibly Hunan province
Western Zhou dynasty (c. 1046–771 B.C.)
c. 10th century B.C.
Bronze
19 x 13 1/2 x 10 in. (48.3 x 34.3 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1995.03
This impressive, heavily cast nao bell is ornamented on each side with eighteen conical studs arranged in three rows, separated by bands of scrolling thunder pattern (leiwen) decoration, and surrounded by borders of fine thread-relief.
Jar with Stamped Decoration
Jar with Stamped Decoration

Jar with Stamped Decoration

China, probably Jiangxi province
Eastern Zhou dynasty (770–221 B.C.)
7th–4th century B.C.
High-fired earthenware
H. 10 3/8 in. (26.4 cm); Diam. 15 3/4 in. (40 cm)
AP 1996.06
The ceramics of the early first millennium B.C. from Jiangxi province in central China are characterized by stamped or impressed geometric designs on high-fired earthenwares, predominantly on vessels of simple forms with high shoulders, short necks, and broad mouths.
Jar with Ribbed Decoration
Jar with Ribbed Decoration

Jar with Ribbed Decoration

China, probably Zhejiang province
Warring States period (475–221 B.C.)
4th century B.C.
Stoneware with yellowish green glaze
H. 9 5/8 in. (24.5 cm); Diam.14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm)
AP 1995.08
From the end of the Warring States period through the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 220), glazed stoneware vessels were routinely produced in northern Zhejiang and southern Jiangsu provinces to serve as funerary storage jars.
Horse and Rider
Horse and Rider

Horse and Rider

China, probably Shaanxi province
Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9)
2nd–1st century B.C.
Earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
22 5/8 x 21 1/2 x 6 5/8 in. (57.5 x 54.6 x 16.8 cm)
AP 1994.07
Tombs of the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D.. 220) were typically furnished with model figures and other objects believed to be necessary for a safe journey to the afterlife.
Cocoon-Shaped Jar with Cloud-Scroll Design
Cocoon-Shaped Jar with Cloud-Scroll Design

Cocoon-Shaped Jar with Cloud-Scroll Design

China, possibly Luoyang, Henan province
Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9)
late 2nd or early 1st century B.C.
Earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
11 1/2 x 13 1/8 x 9 1/4 in. (29.2 x 33.3 x 23.5 cm)
AP 1995.02
This handsome jar would have served as a mortuary object (mingqi), placed in a tomb as a substitute for the more valuable bronze and lacquer vessels used in daily life.
Standing Bodhisattva
Standing Bodhisattva

Standing Bodhisattva

Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
2nd–3rd century A.D.
Gray schist
59 1/8 x 30 x 10 in. (150.2 x 76.2 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1997.04
With its masterly craftsmanship, harmonious proportions, and exceptional size, this majestic image of a standing bodhisattva is distinguished by the rich dress and jewelry of a Kushana prince or nobleman from the ancient region of Gandhara, in northeastern Pakistan, in the first or second century A.
Standing Dog
Standing Dog

Standing Dog

China
Eastern Han dynasty (A.D. 25–220)
c. 1st century A.D.
Earthenware with lead-fluxed glaze
12 1/4 x 13 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (31.1 x 34.3 x 14 cm)
AP 1995.01
During the Eastern Han dynasty, sculptors produced images of various dog types—among them mastiffs and chows—that were then included with the human and other animal figures placed in tombs. Dogs were generally fashioned standing on all fours or in recumbent attitudes.
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants

Seated Buddha with Two Attendants

India, Uttar Pradesh, Mathura
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
A.D. 82
Red sandstone
36 5/8 x 33 5/8 x 6 5/16 in. (93 x 85.4 x 16 cm)
AP 1986.06
The Kushans ruled much of northwestern India and the ancient region of Gandhara (parts of present-day Pakistan and Afghanistan).
Mirror with Animals and Figure
Mirror with Animals and Figure

Mirror with Animals and Figure

China
Eastern Han dynasty (A.D. 25–220)
c. A.D. 100
Cast bronze
6 1/2 in. diameter (16.5 cm diameter)
AP 1984.02
In ancient China, from at least the Shang dynasty (c. 1600–1100 B.C.), mirrors served both as functional articles of daily life and as sacred objects possessing powers of their own. By the fourth century B.C., the custom had developed of placing mirrors in tombs.
Ovoid Jar
Ovoid Jar

Ovoid Jar

Japan
Yayoi period (300 B.C.–A.D. 300)
c. A.D. 100
Low-fired clay
H. 18 7/16 in. (46.8 cm); Diam. 12 5/16 in. (31.3 cm)
AP 1984.15
This jar, characterized by its graceful lines and uncluttered form, is a fine example of the pottery of the Yayoi period, which marks the first settled population in Japan. The combed incisions and flat braided cord are typical Yayoi decorations.
Wide-Mouthed Jar
Wide-Mouthed Jar

Wide-Mouthed Jar

Japan
Yayoi period (300 B.C.–A.D. 300)
c. A.D. 100
Low-fired clay
11 13/16 x 5 7/8 in. (30 x 15 cm)
AP 1985.07
In comparison to the exuberance of the preceding Jomon period pottery, Yayoi wares exhibit simplified silhouettes with spare decoration, reflecting a more settled society. The incised patterns that decorate this graceful storage jar are divided into three registers, accentuating the vessel’s shape.
Standing Buddha
Standing Buddha

Standing Buddha

Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
c. 2nd–3rd century A.D.
Gray schist
51 1/2 x 20 3/4 x 8 1/2 in. (130.8 x 52.7 x 21.6 cm)
AP 1967.01
The historical Buddha was a man who lived and died in northeast India in the sixth century B.C. He established a religion, Buddhism, that spread throughout Asia and profoundly affected its culture. This serene statue is among the earliest anthropomorphic images of this great religious leader.

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