Asian Collection

Four-Armed Ganesha is a large terracotta relief showing Ganesha, the elephant-headed son of Shiva. This relief has been damaged on the bottom and right side, but we do see an elephant’s head with one tusk and an infant’s torso with distended belly
Four-Armed Ganesha
Four-Armed Ganesha
Four-Armed Ganesha is a large terracotta relief showing Ganesha, the elephant-headed son of Shiva. This relief has been damaged on the bottom and right side, but we do see an elephant’s head with one tusk and an infant’s torso with distended belly

Four-Armed Ganesha

India, Uttar Pradesh
Gupta period (320–600)
5th–6th century A.D.
Terracotta relief
19 5/16 x 26 3/4 x 8 1/8 in. (49.1 x 67.9 x 20.6 cm)
AP 1981.11
Ganesha is the elephant-headed son of Shiva, one of the three most important deities of the Hindu pantheon, and his consort, the goddess Parvati. He is widely worshiped as the remover of obstacles and the bestower of good fortune, prosperity, and health.
Pedestaled Ceremonial Stand is a high, hollow pedestal with imposing proportions, strong, solid form, and integrated decoration of square apertures and combed patterns.
Pedestaled Ceremonial Stand
Pedestaled Ceremonial Stand
Pedestaled Ceremonial Stand is a high, hollow pedestal with imposing proportions, strong, solid form, and integrated decoration of square apertures and combed patterns.

Pedestaled Ceremonial Stand

Korea
Silla Kingdom (57 B.C.–A.D. 668)
5th–6th century
Gray stoneware
H. 13 in. (33 cm); Diam. 15 3/4 in. (40 cm)
AP 1996.05
This large pedestal probably served as a support for a large round-bottomed jar. Made for use by the living, it was no doubt later included in a tomb as part of a funerary offering.
Haniwa Seated Man is a clay is hollow clay cylinders that was placed in a mound covering a Japanese royal tomb. The seated man with a mask-like face is seated on a platform. He has short legs and rounded, tubelike arms
Haniwa Seated Man
Haniwa Seated Man
Haniwa Seated Man is a clay is hollow clay cylinders that was placed in a mound covering a Japanese royal tomb. The seated man with a mask-like face is seated on a platform. He has short legs and rounded, tubelike arms

Haniwa Seated Man

Japan, Ibaraki prefecture, Kashima, Hokota site
Kofun period (248–646)
c. A.D. 500
Low-fired clay with cinnabar pigment
29 15/16 x 10 5/8 in. (76 x 27 cm)
AP 1972.02
Haniwa, which means “circle (or tube) of clay,” is the term given to large numbers of hollow clay cylinders that were placed in and around the bases of large earthen mounds covering Japanese royal tombs.
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa is an earthenware jar with traces of paint. The jar is deocrated with  a band of lotus roundels above a band of monster masks, both in relief.
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa is an earthenware jar with traces of paint. The jar is deocrated with  a band of lotus roundels above a band of monster masks, both in relief.

Jar in the Shape of a Stupa

China, Shaanxi, Shandong, or Henan province
Northern Qi period or Sui dynasty (550–577/581–618)
Late 6th or early 7th century
Earthenware with traces of painted polychrome pigment
19 1/4 in. (48.9 cm)
AP 1994.06 a,b,c
This unusual pottery jar illustrates the early assimilation of Buddhist motifs to the decoration of Chinese mortuary objects.
Amphora-Shaped Vase is Chinese variation of a Hellenistic vase with looped handles, finely crackled, almost colorless glaze that separates the glossy upper body from the unglazed portion below.
Amphora-Shaped Vase
Amphora-Shaped Vase
Amphora-Shaped Vase is Chinese variation of a Hellenistic vase with looped handles, finely crackled, almost colorless glaze that separates the glossy upper body from the unglazed portion below.

Amphora-Shaped Vase

China, probably Hebei province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
7th or 8th century A.D.
Stoneware with transparent glaze
H. 14 7/8 in. (37.8 cm); Diam. 7 5/8 in. (19.4 cm)
AP 1969.16
The amphora shape of this vase, modeled after Hellenistic prototypes, has been translated into Chinese idiom by the use of a single color glaze and the substitution of dragon handles for the ordinary loop variety.
Flask is a Japanese ceramic vessel, glazed to a silver hue, with a swelling form on one side and thin incised line decoration.
Flask
Flask
Flask is a Japanese ceramic vessel, glazed to a silver hue, with a swelling form on one side and thin incised line decoration.

Flask

Japan
Asuka period (552–645)
7th century A.D.
High-fired clay (Sue ware)
12 3/8 x 10 3/8 x 7 1/4 in. (31.4 x 26.3 x 18.4 cm)
AP 1983.01
This flask exemplifies a type of ceramic vessel produced in the sixth and seventh centuries in Japan for ritual use or for placement in tombs as offerings.
Detail of Standing Buddha Shakyamuni's body and head. The smooth, fleshy contours of the body are revealed by a thin, clinging garment with cascading pleats delineated into a threadlike surface design. His hand is held in a gesture of charity.
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Detail of Standing Buddha Shakyamuni's body and head. The smooth, fleshy contours of the body are revealed by a thin, clinging garment with cascading pleats delineated into a threadlike surface design. His hand is held in a gesture of charity.

Standing Buddha Shakyamuni

Nepal
Licchavi period (400-750)
7th century
Gilded copper
19 3/4 x 8 x 3 3/8 in. (50.2 x 20.3 x 8.6 cm)
AP 1979.01
This slim, richly gilded figure represents the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, Sage of the Shakya clan.
Court Lady is an animated and charming earthenware funerary sculpture representing one of the court's ladies. She wears long robes, a white jacket, and upturned shoes.
Court Lady
Court Lady
Court Lady is an animated and charming earthenware funerary sculpture representing one of the court's ladies. She wears long robes, a white jacket, and upturned shoes.

Court Lady

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
16 5/16 x 7 1/16 x 6 3/8 in. (41.5 x 18 x 16.2 cm)
AP 2001.01
One of the most engaging and distinctive groups of Tang funerary sculpture is the one representing ladies of the court. This animated and charming example stands in a gracefully swayed pose, her petite hands held in a conversational gesture in front of her swelling form.
The Kimbell’s Earth Spirit stands in a rampant posture of conquest as it subdues a snarling beast upon a rockwork base, its left arm entwined with a serpent. The spirit’s triple horns, bulging eyes, and bare-teethed grimace add to its ferocious appearance.
Earth Spirit
Earth Spirit
The Kimbell’s Earth Spirit stands in a rampant posture of conquest as it subdues a snarling beast upon a rockwork base, its left arm entwined with a serpent. The spirit’s triple horns, bulging eyes, and bare-teethed grimace add to its ferocious appearance.

Earth Spirit

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
31 1/8 x 7 9/16 x 11 1/4 in. (79.1 x 19.2 x 28.5 cm)
AP 2001.02
The inclusion of fantastic animal guardians as part of the retinue of tomb figures began in the Northern Wei dynasty (A.D. 386–534) and continued into the Tang dynasty.
Detail of torso and chest of Harihara with almond-shaped eyes, delicately traced brows, and subtly molded lips and nose have the particularity of portraiture, an individualized treatment that may represent the royal patron who commissioned the sculpture.
Harihara
Harihara
Detail of torso and chest of Harihara with almond-shaped eyes, delicately traced brows, and subtly molded lips and nose have the particularity of portraiture, an individualized treatment that may represent the royal patron who commissioned the sculpture.

Harihara

Cambodia, Kompong Cham, style of Prasat Andet
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
c. 675–700
Stone
45 1/2 x 20 7/8 x 11 in. (115.6 x 53 x 28 cm)
AP 1988.01
The Khmer kingdom controlled Cambodia as well as large areas of Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos from the sixth to the fifteenth centuries.
Ewer with a Short Spout is a spherical shape with lustrous brown gaze.
Ewer with a Short Spout
Ewer with a Short Spout
Ewer with a Short Spout is a spherical shape with lustrous brown gaze.

Ewer with a Short Spout

China
Tang dynasty (618–907)
8th or 9th century
Stoneware with mottled golden brown glaze
H. 7 1/2 in. (19 cm); Diam. 6 5/8 in. (19 cm)
AG 1973.03
This ewer is distinguished by its spherical shape and lustrous brown glaze, which falls short of the base in a sweeping curve, revealing its light buff body. The handle terminates at the rim in a stylized, natural form.
Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type is a mask of Karura, a mythical giant bird. The mask's features include pierced, close-set eyes, which stare down toward the tip of a prominent beak that grasps a round bead, and a cock’s comb that projects from the crown of the head.
Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type
Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type
Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type is a mask of Karura, a mythical giant bird. The mask's features include pierced, close-set eyes, which stare down toward the tip of a prominent beak that grasps a round bead, and a cock’s comb that projects from the crown of the head.

Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type

Japan
Nara period (A.D. 710–794)
8th century
Dry lacquer (dakkatsu kanshitsu)
14 x 10 1/8 x 12 in. (35.6 x 25.7 x 30.5 cm)
AP 2005.02
This very striking and expressive Japanese gigaku mask depicts Karura, one of the fourteen characters in the gigaku, a religious dance-drama that was performed for the Japanese royal court at Buddhist temple ceremonies from the 7th to the 10th century.
The torso adorned in a simple skirt with a scarf across the chest and a long, elaborate necklace, represents a bodhisattva attendant to the Buddha
Bodhisattva Torso
Bodhisattva Torso
The torso adorned in a simple skirt with a scarf across the chest and a long, elaborate necklace, represents a bodhisattva attendant to the Buddha

Bodhisattva Torso

China, probably Shanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
c. 775–800
Stone, traces of gesso and pigment
39 x 12 15/16 x 8 in. (99 x 32.8 x 20.3 cm)
AP 1987.01
The evolution of Chinese Buddhist sculpture from archaic and columnar to fleshy and sensuous reached its culmination in the Tang dynasty, by which time Chinese Buddhist sculpture in the round shows a masterful adaptation of foreign Indian style to indigenous traditions.
Bodhisattva Torso is a bronze four-armed bodhisattva. He has a slender, bare body, clothed only in a short garment covering the loins
The Bodhisattva Maitreya
The Bodhisattva Maitreya
Bodhisattva Torso is a bronze four-armed bodhisattva. He has a slender, bare body, clothed only in a short garment covering the loins

The Bodhisattva Maitreya

Thailand, Prakhon Chai, Buriram province
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
Late 8th century A.D.
Bronze
48 1/4 x 20 1/16 x 12 3/8 in. (122.5 x 51 x 31.5 cm)
AP 1965.01
The earliest surviving Buddhist images in Southeast Asia, dating from the fourth and fifth centuries A.D., were the bronzes brought from India and Sri Lanka by merchants and monks. The first locally made images date to the sixth century and demonstrate that regional styles were already developing.
Standing Female Deity is a delicately carved sandstone sculpture of a fertility goddess. She stands and is now missing her feet and two of her original four arms.
Standing Female Deity
Standing Female Deity
Standing Female Deity is a delicately carved sandstone sculpture of a fertility goddess. She stands and is now missing her feet and two of her original four arms.

Standing Female Deity

India, Rajasthan or Madhya Pradesh
Medieval period (c. 600–1200)
10th or 11th century
Pinkish tan sandstone
56 3/4 x 22 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (144.2 x 56.5 x 28.6 cm)
AP 1968.01
Fertility goddesses of different types were an important component of early Indian nature cults and were eventually assimilated into the symbolic repertoire of later Indian religious art.
Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest
Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest

Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest

Japan
Heian period (794–1185)
11th century
Polychromed wood
19 1/4 x 16 1/8 x 12 5/8 in. (48.9 x 41 x 32 cm)
AP 1981.19
The Shinto god Hachiman has enjoyed special prominence throughout Japanese history. He was originally a local military guardian, protecting an agricultural and mining community in Usa.

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