Italian Collection

The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus

The Raising of Lazarus

Duccio di Buoninsegna
Italian (active 1278–1318)
14th century
1310–11
Tempera and gold on panel
17 1/8 x 18 1/4 in. (43.5 x 46.4 cm) Framed: 20 7/8 x 22 1/8 x 1 7/8 in. (53 x 56.2 x 4.8 cm)
APx 1975.01
Duccio was the preeminent Sienese painter in the early years of the fourteenth century. He infused the prevailing Byzantine style with a more naturalistic, narrative mode.
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish

Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Fish

Italian
15th century
c. 1425–50
Tin-glazed earthenware
7 3/4 x 8 x 7 in. (19.7 x 20.3 x 17.8 cm)
AP 1979.06
This type of earthenware has a tin-glazed, opaque white surface that provides an excellent ground for pictorial decoration.
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs
Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs

Apothecary Jar with Oak Leaf and Lily Motifs

Italian
15th century
c. 1425–50
Tin-glazed earthenware
9 x 9 x 8 in. (22.8 x 22.8 x 20.3 cm)
AP 1979.07
This type of earthenware has a tin-glazed, opaque white surface that provides an excellent ground for pictorial decoration.
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

Fra Angelico (Fra Giovanni da Fiesole)
Italian (c. 1395/1400–1455)
15th century
c. 1426–29
Tempera and gold on panel
10 9/16 x 9 3/8 in. (26.8 x 23.8 cm) Framed: 18 5/8 x 17 7/16 in. (47.3 x 44.3 cm)
AP 1986.03
Born Guido di Piero, the artist known as Fra Angelico acquired his nickname not long after his death, when he was referred to as “Angelicus” by a fellow Dominican monk for his pious life and artworks.
Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif
Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif

Albarello with Scrolling Gothic Leaf Motif

Italian
15th century
c. 1450–1500
Tin-glazed earthenware
12 5/8 x 5 3/8 in. (32 x 13.6 cm)
AP 1979.10
By the late fifteenth century, polychrome wares had replaced the more limited palette of Severe-style majolica, adding new shades of gold and green. Plant forms predominated, particularly an elegantly scrolled “Gothic-floral” leaf.
Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif
Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif

Apothecary Jar with Gothic Leaf Motif

Italian
15th century
c. 1450–75
Tin-glazed earthenware
8 1/8 x 7 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (20.6 x 19 x 14 cm)
AP 1979.08
By the late fifteenth century, polychrome wares had replaced the more limited palette of Severe-style majolica, adding new shades of gold and green.
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Attributed to Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi)
Italian (1386/87–1466)
15th century
c. 1450
Terracotta
32 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (83.5 x 52.1 cm)
AP 2006.01
Celebrated for his powers of invention, range of expression, and technical prowess, Donatello was the preeminent Italian sculptor of the fifteenth century.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child

The Madonna and Child

Giovanni Bellini
Italian (c. 1438–1516)
15th century
c. 1465
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
32 1/2 x 23 in. (82.5 x 58.4 cm) Framed: 48 x 39 1/8 x 5 in. (121.9 x 99.4 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1971.06
Giovanni Bellini’s half-length devotional paintings of the Madonna and Child enjoyed great popularity in Venice, and later in his career he employed a large workshop to meet the demand.
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

Andrea Mantegna
Italian (c. 1430/31–1506)
15th century
c. 1485–88
Distemper, oil, and gold on canvas
24 3/4 x 20 3/16 in. (62.9 x 51.3 cm) Framed: 32 3/8 x 28 3/8 x 3 in. (82.2 x 72.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1987.04
Trained in the humanist university town of Padua, Andrea Mantegna developed a lifelong passion for antiquity that profoundly informed his work as an artist.
Portia and Brutus
Portia and Brutus

Portia and Brutus

Ercole de’ Roberti
Italian (c. 1455/56–1496)
15th century
c. 1486–90
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
19 3/16 x 13 1/2 in. (48.7 x 34.3 cm) Framed: 25 3/4 x 20 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (65.4 x 52.1 x 5.7 cm)
AP 1986.05
Ercole de’ Roberti spent the latter half of his career at the court of Ercole I d’Este, Duke of Ferrara, painting altarpieces, small devotional works, portraits, and fresco cycles for the Este residences, as well as decorative projects.
The Torment of Saint Anthony
The Torment of Saint Anthony

The Torment of Saint Anthony

Michelangelo Buonarroti
Italian (1475–1564)
15th century
c. 1487-88
Tempera and oil on panel
18 1/2 x 13 3/4 in. (47 x 34.9 cm) Framed: 27 x 22 3/8 x 2 1/4 in. (68.6 x 56.8 x 5.7 cm)
AP 2009.01
This is the first known painting by Michelangelo, described by his earliest biographers and believed to have been painted when he was twelve or thirteen years old.
Albarello with Pine Cone Motif
Albarello with Pine Cone Motif

Albarello with Pine Cone Motif

Italian
15th century
c. 1500
Tin-glazed earthenware
12 1/4 x 5 1/2 in. (31.1 x 14 cm)
AP 1979.09
By the late fifteenth century, polychrome wares had replaced the more limited palette of Severe-style majolica, adding new shades of gold and green. Plant forms predominated, particularly an elegantly scrolled “Gothic-floral” leaf motif.
Christ Blessing
Christ Blessing

Christ Blessing

Giovanni Bellini
Italian (c. 1438–1516)
16th century
c. 1500
Tempera, oil, and gold on panel
23 1/4 x 18 1/2 in. (59 x 47 cm) Framed: 31 x 26 x 3 in. (78.7 x 66 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1967.07
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the central mystery of the Christian faith: the incarnation, when Christ––fully human and fully divine––was sent to earth to redeem humankind.
Christ the Redeemer
Christ the Redeemer

Christ the Redeemer

Attributed to Tullio Lombardo
Italian (c. 1455–1532)
16th century
c. 1500–1520
White marble relief
13 3/16 x 12 3/16 x 3 9/16 in. (33.5 x 31 x 9 cm)
AP 2005.04
This marble relief has recently been attributed to the Venetian sculptor Tullio Lombardo. Tullio was well versed in both ancient art and the work of contemporary artists outside Venice, such as Mantegna and Leonardo da Vinci.
Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este
Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este

Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este

Attributed to Gian Cristoforo Romano
Italian (c. 1465–1512)
16th century
c. 1500
Terracotta, formerly polychromed
21 3/8 x 21 1/2 in. (54.3 x 54.6 cm)
AP 2004.01
This rare terracotta portrait bust probably represents Isabella d’Este, Marchioness of Mantua. The most celebrated woman of her day, Isabella d’Este (1474–1539) cultivated one of the most illustrious courts in Renaissance Italy.
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope

Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope

Bambaia (Agostino Busti)
Italian (c. 1483–1548)
16th century
c. 1520–25
Marble
a: 23 13/16 x 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (60.5 x 24.2 x 19.3 cm) b: 26 3/16 x 12 3/8 x 6 1/2 in. (66.5 x 31.5 x 16.5 cm)
AP 1981.12 a,b
Agostino Busti, known as Bambaia, was an important Lombard sculptor, notable for his refined technique and innovative classicism.

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