Indian Collection

Upper torso and head of Standing Bodhisattva
Standing Bodhisattva
Standing Bodhisattva
Upper torso and head of Standing Bodhisattva

Standing Bodhisattva

Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
2nd–3rd century A.D.
Gray schist
59 1/8 x 30 x 10 in. (150.2 x 76.2 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1997.04
With its masterly craftsmanship, harmonious proportions, and exceptional size, this majestic image of a standing bodhisattva is distinguished by the rich dress and jewelry of a Kushana prince or nobleman from the ancient region of Gandhara, in northeastern Pakistan, in the first or second century A.
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants sculpted in red sandstone. The Buddha is portrayed as a traditional yogi, seated on a throne, and dressed as a monk with his left shoulder covered and right hand raised
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants sculpted in red sandstone. The Buddha is portrayed as a traditional yogi, seated on a throne, and dressed as a monk with his left shoulder covered and right hand raised

Seated Buddha with Two Attendants

India, Uttar Pradesh, Mathura
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
A.D. 82
Red sandstone
36 5/8 x 33 5/8 x 6 5/16 in. (93 x 85.4 x 16 cm)
AP 1986.06
The Kushans ruled much of northwestern India and the ancient region of Gandhara (parts of present-day Pakistan and Afghanistan).
Detail of head and upper torso of Standhing Buddha, one of the first anthropomorphic representations of Buddha
Standing Buddha
Standing Buddha
Detail of head and upper torso of Standhing Buddha, one of the first anthropomorphic representations of Buddha

Standing Buddha

Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
c. 2nd–3rd century A.D.
Gray schist
51 1/2 x 20 3/4 x 8 1/2 in. (130.8 x 52.7 x 21.6 cm)
AP 1967.01
The historical Buddha was a man who lived and died in northeast India in the sixth century B.C. He established a religion, Buddhism, that spread throughout Asia and profoundly affected its culture. This serene statue is among the earliest anthropomorphic images of this great religious leader.
Four-Armed Ganesha is a large terracotta relief showing Ganesha, the elephant-headed son of Shiva. This relief has been damaged on the bottom and right side, but we do see an elephant’s head with one tusk and an infant’s torso with distended belly
Four-Armed Ganesha
Four-Armed Ganesha
Four-Armed Ganesha is a large terracotta relief showing Ganesha, the elephant-headed son of Shiva. This relief has been damaged on the bottom and right side, but we do see an elephant’s head with one tusk and an infant’s torso with distended belly

Four-Armed Ganesha

India, Uttar Pradesh
Gupta period (320–600)
5th–6th century A.D.
Terracotta relief
19 5/16 x 26 3/4 x 8 1/8 in. (49.1 x 67.9 x 20.6 cm)
AP 1981.11
Ganesha is the elephant-headed son of Shiva, one of the three most important deities of the Hindu pantheon, and his consort, the goddess Parvati. He is widely worshiped as the remover of obstacles and the bestower of good fortune, prosperity, and health.
Standing Female Deity is a delicately carved sandstone sculpture of a fertility goddess. She stands and is now missing her feet and two of her original four arms.
Standing Female Deity
Standing Female Deity
Standing Female Deity is a delicately carved sandstone sculpture of a fertility goddess. She stands and is now missing her feet and two of her original four arms.

Standing Female Deity

India, Rajasthan or Madhya Pradesh
Medieval period (c. 600–1200)
10th or 11th century
Pinkish tan sandstone
56 3/4 x 22 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (144.2 x 56.5 x 28.6 cm)
AP 1968.01
Fertility goddesses of different types were an important component of early Indian nature cults and were eventually assimilated into the symbolic repertoire of later Indian religious art.
Head of a Jina is massive head that belonged to a colossal statue. It is carved from pink sandstone.
Head of a Jina
Head of a Jina
Head of a Jina is massive head that belonged to a colossal statue. It is carved from pink sandstone.

Head of a Jina

India, Rajasthan or Madhya Pradesh
Medieval period (c. 600–1200)
11th century
Gray pink sandstone
30 3/8 x 26 1/4 x 21 in. (77.1 x 66.7 x 53.3 cm)
AG 1968.01
This massive head belonged to a colossal statue representing one of the twenty-four saviors of the Jain religion.
Detail of upper torso and head of Parvati, elegantly poised and beautifully adorned in a diaphanous skirt and jewelry.
Parvati
Parvati
Detail of upper torso and head of Parvati, elegantly poised and beautifully adorned in a diaphanous skirt and jewelry.

Parvati

India
Chola period (c. 850–1310)
c. 11th century
Bronze
22 3/4 x 8 3/8 x 6 3/8 in. (57.8 x 21.3 x 16.2 cm)
AG 1970.03
From the ninth to the thirteenth century, the Chola kingdom in South India originated a tradition of cast bronze Hindu sculpture in the round. Metal statues were used as icons and processional images in place of stone sculptures found in temples.
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara is a carved schist  stela, tin which the youthful, bejeweled figure is seated on a double-lotus throne, surrounded by lotus blossoms
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara is a carved schist  stela, tin which the youthful, bejeweled figure is seated on a double-lotus throne, surrounded by lotus blossoms

Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara

India, Bengal
Pala period (750–1174)
c. 11th–12th century
Gray schist
49 3/16 x 31 5/8 x 14 1/8 in. (124.9 x 80.3 x 35.9 cm)
AP 1970.13
The increasing complexity of imagery and iconographic detail in late Pala art paralleled the growing popularity of Esoteric Buddhism in eastern India.
Detail of Vishnu attired in a richly draped and elaborately fastened skirt (dhoti), ornate jewelry, and a tall regal crown.
Vishnu
Vishnu
Detail of Vishnu attired in a richly draped and elaborately fastened skirt (dhoti), ornate jewelry, and a tall regal crown.

Vishnu

India
Chola period (c. 850–1310)
13th century
Bronze
33 3/4 x 13 3/8 x 12 7/8 in. (85.7 x 34 x 32.7 cm)
AG 1970.01
The Cholas originated a tradition of large-scale, cast-metal Hindu sculpture in the round. These sculptures were carried in ritual processions through the temple and adjoining precincts––the lugs and holes on the base were used for the insertion of poles to support the image.
Parvati is a bronze standing sculpture representing the divinity as an ideal beauty on a pedestal
Parvati
Parvati
Parvati is a bronze standing sculpture representing the divinity as an ideal beauty on a pedestal

Parvati

India
Vijayanagar period (1336–1565)
15th century
Bronze
35 11/16 x 10 15/16 x 9 5/8 in. (90.7 x 27.8 x 24.5 cm)
AP 1969.13
One of the most striking characteristics of the Hindu religion is the importance of goddesses. Fertility goddesses were an important component of early Indian nature cults and were eventually assimilated into the symbolic repertoire of late Indian religious art.
In this folio from a Ragmala album, a Ragini, longing for her lover, paints his portrait in the belief that the image of something real can conjure up the subject of the image.
Ragamala Painting of Dhanasri Ragini
Ragamala Painting of Dhanasri Ragini
In this folio from a Ragmala album, a Ragini, longing for her lover, paints his portrait in the belief that the image of something real can conjure up the subject of the image.

Ragamala Painting of Dhanasri Ragini

India, Rajasthan
Rajput period
c. 1690
Gouache on paper
10 1/8 x 8 1/2 in. (25.7 x 21.6 cm)
AG 1975.03
Ragmala paintings represent a confluence of three Indian artistic traditions—classical music, poetry, and miniature painting. Consisting of an album of between thirty-six and forty-two painted folio sheets, Ragmalas are organized according to families.