Saint Sebastian Tended by Irene

Attributed to Georges de La Tour
French (1593–1652)
17th century
early 1630s
Oil on canvas
41 1/4 x 54 7/8 in. (104.8 x 139.4 cm) Framed: 50 x 64 3/8 x 3 3/4 in. (127 x 163.5 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1993.04
Currently Not On View
Saint Sebastian––a Roman soldier who suffered martyrdom around A.D. 300––was nursed by the pious Irene, who, upon discovering him still alive, tenderly removed the arrows that pierced his body. He was a protector against the epidemics that plagued the artist’s native Lorraine, and La Tour’s various versions of this scene were by far the most copied of his works in the seventeenth century. In 1751 a local historian made reference to one that La Tour presented to Duke Charles IV of Lorraine and another that he presented to King Louis XIII of France. The king admired his version so much that he “had all the other paintings removed from his room in order to leave only this one.” Today more than ten versions of the composition are known in horizontal format, differing widely in quality and condition. Opinion on the Kimbell painting is divided: most scholars consider it to be a copy; others believe that it may be one of the works painted by La Tour himself, possibly the version he gave to Charles IV. The painting has suffered damage (especially in the darkest passages) from the transfer of the paint layer to a new canvas, rendering connoisseurship difficult. Nevertheless, it exhibits evidence of reworking or pentimenti during its creation, as well as the use of preliminary markings and incisions to establish the contours, a distinctive feature of La Tour’s working method. Most important, the palette, modeling, and brushwork in the better-preserved passages are of a quality approaching La Tour’s autograph works.

Provenance

Reportedly from a convent, region of Marseille, France, before 1918. (Unidentified dealer, Marseille, France); purchased by Mme. Renée Berdot de Backer, Paris, after 1918; on consignment to (Pieter de Boer, Amsterdam), 1949; purchased by the Nelson Gallery of Art and Atkins Museum of Fine Arts, now the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri, through (Hanns Schaeffer Galleries, Inc., New York), 1954; (sale, Sotheby’s, New York, 15 January 1993, no. 14, as circle of La Tour); purchased through (Wheelock, Whitney & Co., New York) by Kimbell Art Foundation, Fort Worth, 1993.