Peasant Interior with an Old Flute Player

Louis (or Antoine?) Le Nain
French (c. 1600/1603–1648)
17th century
c. 1642
Oil on canvas
21 5/16 x 24 7/16 in. (54.1 x 62.1 cm) Framed: 28 1/2 x 32 x 4 1/2 in. (72.4 x 81.3 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1984.22
Currently On View
The Le Nain brothers––Antoine, Louis, and Mathieu––were born in Laon and settled in the artist’s community of Saint-Germain-des-Prés, in Paris, by 1629. The brothers were founding members of the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture in 1648. Antoine and Louis died that same year, presumably of the plague. The Le Nain studio produced portraits and religious works as well as mythological and genre scenes. A group of peasant scenes characterized by their sensitive, subdued palette and emotional solemnity has traditionally been assigned to Louis, who has been regarded as the genius of the family. In the Peasant Interior with an Old Flute Player, an air of serenity surrounds the dignified group, still and silent but for the sound of the flute. Despite the artist’s clear sympathy with humble values, however, the scene is an idealized portrayal of peasant life. Wine in a crystal glass was not peasant fare. Together with the bread placed on the white tablecloth, the wine evidently alludes to the Eucharistic meal and Christian charity, exemplified by this humble household. Much remains to be learned about the Le Nains’ patrons, who may have included members of pious religious groups in Paris and the outlying regions. The reforming clergy encouraged the devout to emulate the virtues of the idealized poor, such as simplicity, humility, and patience.

Collection Recordings

Recordings for Adults

Le Nain, Peasant Interior with an Old Flute Player

Recordings for Children

(Child) Le Nain, Peasant Interior

Provenance

John Rushout, 2nd baron Northwick [1769/70-1859], Northwick Park, Worcestershire (now Gloucestershire), and Thirlestane House, Cheltenham, England, by 1846; (his sale at Thirlestane House, Phillips, London, 26 July–30 August 1859, no. 155); purchased on 27 July 1859 for 91 guineas by William Gibbs [1790-1875], Tyntesfield House, Wraxall, Somerset, England; by descent to his son, Antony Gibbs [1841-1907], Tyntesfield House, Wraxall, Somerset; by descent to his son, George Abraham Gibbs, 1st baron Wraxall [1873-1931], Tyntesfield House, Wraxall, Somerset; by descent to his son, George Richard Lawley Gibbs, 2nd baron Wraxall [1928-2001], Tyntesfield House, Wraxall, Somerset; (sale, Christie, Manson and Woods, London, 11 December 1981, no. 127, bought in); purchased through (E. V. Thaw & Co., Inc., New York) by Kimbell Art Foundation, Fort Worth, 1984.