Roman Collection

Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)

Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)

Hellenistic or Roman
probably after Lysippos (Greek, c. 365-c. 310 B.C.)
c. 2nd–1st century B.C.
Cast bronze
11 1/2 × 8 1/4 × 10 3/4 in. (29.2 × 21 × 27.3 cm) Weight: 36.6 lb. (16.6 kg)
AP 2000.03 a,b
This exceptionally fine and rare head comes from the statue of an athlete shown scraping oil from his naked body with a strigil after exercising. The lips were originally overlaid with copper, and the eyes inlaid with stone, glass, and metal.
Crouching Aphrodite
Crouching Aphrodite

Crouching Aphrodite

Roman, based on a Greek original of c. 3rd–2nd century B.C.
Late Republican–Early Imperial (1st cent. B.C.–2nd cent. A.D.)
c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 140
Marble
25 x 13 7/8 x 19 3/8 in. (63.5 x 35.3 x 49.2 cm)
AP 1967.09
According to the primal Greek myth recounted in Hesiod’s Theogony (genealogy of the gods), Aphrodite, the goddess of love, was born of the aphros, the foam created when Kronos threw the genitals of his father, Uranos (Heaven), into the sea.
Priestess of the Imperial Cult
Priestess of the Imperial Cult

Priestess of the Imperial Cult

Roman
2nd century A.D.
A.D. 170–180
Marble
13 1/4 x 10 5/8 x 9 5/8 in. (33.6 x 27 x 24.5 cm)
AP 1969.18
This head of a young woman was originally part of a full-length, draped statue. It was formerly identified as a portrait of Faustina the Younger, wife of the emperor Marcus Aurelius and daughter of Antoninus Pius.
Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius
Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius

Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius

Roman
3rd century
c. A.D. 210–225
Marble (probably from Carrara, Italy)
14 3/8 x 9 7/8 x 10 1/4 in. (36.5 x 25.1 x 26 cm)
AP 1967.11
The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (reigned A.D. 161–80), the archetypal “philosopher-king,” is perhaps best known today as the author of the Stoic philosophical treatise The Meditations.