On View

The Judgment of Paris depicts Paris tethering his horse and falling asleep after losing his way in a hunting expedition, at which Mercury appears in his dream and presents the three goddesses.
The Judgment of Paris
The Judgment of Paris
The Judgment of Paris depicts Paris tethering his horse and falling asleep after losing his way in a hunting expedition, at which Mercury appears in his dream and presents the three goddesses.

The Judgment of Paris

Lucas Cranach the Elder
German (1472–1553)
16th century
c. 1512–14
Oil on panel
16 15/16 x 12 11/16 in. (43 x 32.2 cm) Framed: 21 x 17 x 2 in. (53.3 x 43.2 x 5.1 cm)
AP 2004.03
This is the first of Cranach’s several versions of The Judgment of Paris. According to Greek and Roman mythology, the goddess of discord tossed an apple labeled “to the fairest” among the Olympian gods.
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda shows the sitter’s finely delineated features. The artist carefully renders the textures of the carpet, fur collar, buttons, and checkered black-and-gold doublet, creating an image of jewel-like intensity.
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda
Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda shows the sitter’s finely delineated features. The artist carefully renders the textures of the carpet, fur collar, buttons, and checkered black-and-gold doublet, creating an image of jewel-like intensity.

Portrait of Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda

Jan Gossart, called Mabuse
Netherlandish (c. 1478–1532)
16th century
c. 1516–17
Oil on panel
22 1/2 x 18 1/16 in. (57.2 x 45.8 cm) Framed: 29 1/2 x 26 x 3 1/2 in. (74.9 x 66 x 8.9 cm)
AP 1979.30
Having accompanied his patron Philip of Burgundy to Rome in 1508–9, Jan Gossart was one of the first artists to disseminate the Italian style in the Low Countries. The subject of this portrait is Hendrik III, Count of Nassau-Breda (1483–1538).
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.

Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope

Bambaia (Agostino Busti)
Italian (c. 1483–1548)
16th century
c. 1520–25
Marble
a: 23 13/16 x 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (60.5 x 24.2 x 19.3 cm) b: 26 3/16 x 12 3/8 x 6 1/2 in. (66.5 x 31.5 x 16.5 cm)
AP 1981.12 a,b
Agostino Busti, known as Bambaia, was an important Lombard sculptor, notable for his refined technique and innovative classicism.
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.

The Madonna and Child

Parmigianino (Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola)
Italian (1503–1540)
16th century
c. 1527–30
Oil on panel
17 5/8 x 13 3/8 in. (44.8 x 34 cm) Framed: 24 1/16 x 20 x 2 1/2 in. (61.1 x 50.8 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1995.09
Hailed as the new Raphael, Parmigianino was one of the most influential artists of the sixteenth century, cultivating a mannered gracefulness of pose and physiognomy, combined with new and dramatic coloristic effects, that transformed the classicism of his Renaissance predecessors.
Head of a Woman is a majestic head of an ideal beauty. He has emulated the smooth and abstracted facial structure found in classical sculpture
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman is a majestic head of an ideal beauty. He has emulated the smooth and abstracted facial structure found in classical sculpture

Head of a Woman

Sebastiano del Piombo (Sebastiano Luciani)
Italian (c. 1485–1547)
16th century
early 1530s
Oil on panel
10 in. diameter (25.4 cm diameter) Framed: 17 x 2 in. (43.2 x 5.1 cm)
AP 1985.08
Notable for the monumental grandeur of his religious paintings and portraits, Sebastiano del Piombo became the preeminent painter in Rome following Raphael’s death in 1520.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.

The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Italian (c. 1488–1576)
16th century
1530s
Oil on panel
41 1/2 x 58 3/8 in. (105.4 x 148.3 cm) Framed: 54 1/2 x 71 1/8 x 3 3/4 in. (138.4 x 180.7 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1986.07
More than any other Renaissance master, Titian was acclaimed—in his own lifetime and for centuries thereafter—for his expressive handling of paint and rich use of color. Like his teachers Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione, Titian set many of his religious subjects in a pastoral landscape.
The Supper at Emmaus is Bassano's oil painting depicting Christ’s miraculous appearance after the Resurrection. In the act of blessing and breaking bread at the inn, Christ, who is seated beneath a velvet green canopy, reveals himself to two of his disciples
The Supper at Emmaus
The Supper at Emmaus
The Supper at Emmaus is Bassano's oil painting depicting Christ’s miraculous appearance after the Resurrection. In the act of blessing and breaking bread at the inn, Christ, who is seated beneath a velvet green canopy, reveals himself to two of his disciples

The Supper at Emmaus

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
c. 1538
Oil on canvas
39 5/8 x 50 5/8 in. (100.6 x 128.6 cm) Framed: 47 x 59 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (119.4 x 150.5 x 8.9 cm)
APx 1989.03
Jacopo Bassano was one of the most famous and influential masters of the late Renaissance in Italy, admired for his luminous color and sensitively observed incidents from everyday life.
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar is Bassano's oil portrait of a Franciscan Friar.  The skull at the bottom right of the composition is a reminder of the vanity of earthly life, supports the contemplative aspect of the friar’s piety. A pen holder hangs from the rope at his waist, while his left hand is held up in a gesture of benediction.
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar is Bassano's oil portrait of a Franciscan Friar.  The skull at the bottom right of the composition is a reminder of the vanity of earthly life, supports the contemplative aspect of the friar’s piety. A pen holder hangs from the rope at his waist, while his left hand is held up in a gesture of benediction.

Portrait of a Franciscan Friar

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
c. 1540–42
Oil on canvas
31 11/16 x 27 3/16 in. (80.5 x 69 cm) Framed: 48 3/4 x 44 3/4 x 3 5/8 in. (123.8 x 113.7 x 9.2 cm)
AP 1997.02
In this imposing portrait, Jacopo Bassano applies a vigorous and sharply focused naturalism to portray the distinctive features as well as the spiritual temperament and preoccupations of an unidentified Franciscan friar.
The Adoration of the Magi
The Adoration of the Magi

The Adoration of the Magi

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
after 1555
Oil on jasper
7 1/4 x 5 1/2 in. (18.4 x 14 cm) Framed: 12 3/4 x 11 x 1 5/8 in. (32.4 x 27.9 x 4.1 cm)
AG 1990.01
The subject of the Adoration of the Magi, along with the Adoration of the Shepherds, occupies pride of place in Jacopo Bassano’s repertory.
Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan
Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan

Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan

Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti)
Italian (1518–1594)
16th century
1567–70
Oil on canvas
49 5/8 x 41 15/16 in. (126 x 106.6 cm) Framed: 57 1/2 x 48 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. (146.1 x 123.8 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1986.08
A prolific master of religious and historical works, as well as portraits, Tintoretto developed a rapid, often impetuous manner of painting that was both expressive and expedient.
The Canying Hall is a paper hanging scroll  thought to depict the artist's own villa. A scholar plays the qin (Chinese lute) for his guest within a walled enclosure, while nearby a servant can be seen tending chrysanthemums.
The Canying Hall
The Canying Hall
The Canying Hall is a paper hanging scroll  thought to depict the artist's own villa. A scholar plays the qin (Chinese lute) for his guest within a walled enclosure, while nearby a servant can be seen tending chrysanthemums.

The Canying Hall

Lu Zhi
Chinese (1496–1576)
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
1572
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
54 3/4 x 27 1/2 in. (139 x 69.9 cm)
AP 1981.15
During the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), the city of Suzhou became the center for a group of painters known as the Wu school. Lu Zhi was distinguished among these artists for an eclectic style that combined elements from both the amateur (literati) and professional traditions.
Wine Flask is a simple, conservative, yet striking wood vessel with broad, softly rounded shoulders curving to a sharp edge that sets off the extreme slope of the body to the narrow waist and broad, flat foot.
Wine Flask
Wine Flask
Wine Flask is a simple, conservative, yet striking wood vessel with broad, softly rounded shoulders curving to a sharp edge that sets off the extreme slope of the body to the narrow waist and broad, flat foot.

Wine Flask

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
late 16th or early 17th century
Wood with black and red lacquer (Negoro ware)
11 3/4 x 8 3/4 in. (29.9 x 22.3 cm)
AP 1981.16
Negoro lacquerwares constitute a special group of simple food-serving utensils that are distinctive for their solid, cinnabar red finish and austere, functional forms.
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan is a paper hanging scroll which depicts a tall, narrow landscape crowded with wooded mountains, winding paths, torrents, and leafy trees executed in ink and pale colors.
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan is a paper hanging scroll which depicts a tall, narrow landscape crowded with wooded mountains, winding paths, torrents, and leafy trees executed in ink and pale colors.

Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan

Wen Jia
Chinese (1501–1583)
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
1577
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
65 3/4 x 20 1/2 in. (167 x 52 cm)
AP 1980.01
Wen Jia, a recognized poet, critic, and connoisseur of painting, was the second son of Wen Zhengming (1470–1559), one of the literati artists of the Wu school in Suzhou during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644).
The Butcher's Shop is Caracci's forthright portrayal of the tradesmen, with their sober, ceremonious demeanor and clean white aprons.
The Butcher's Shop
The Butcher's Shop
The Butcher's Shop is Caracci's forthright portrayal of the tradesmen, with their sober, ceremonious demeanor and clean white aprons.

The Butcher's Shop

Annibale Carracci
Italian (1560–1609)
16th century
early 1580s
Oil on canvas
23 1/2 x 27 15/16 in. (59.7 x 71 cm) Framed: 30 1/4 x 34 7/8 x 2 3/8 in. (76.8 x 88.6 x 6 cm)
AP 1980.08
Around the time that he painted The Butcher’s Shop, in about 1582, Annibale Carracci joined his older cousin Ludovico and his brother Agostino to found the Carracci Academy in Bologna.
In The Cardsharps, the players are engaged in a game of primero, a forerunner of poker. Engrossed in his cards at left is the dupe, unaware that the older cardsharp signals his accomplice with a raised, gloved hand (the fingertips exposed, better to feel marked cards). At right, the young cheat looks expectantly toward the boy and reaches behind his back to pull a hidden card from his breeches.
The Cardsharps
The Cardsharps
In The Cardsharps, the players are engaged in a game of primero, a forerunner of poker. Engrossed in his cards at left is the dupe, unaware that the older cardsharp signals his accomplice with a raised, gloved hand (the fingertips exposed, better to feel marked cards). At right, the young cheat looks expectantly toward the boy and reaches behind his back to pull a hidden card from his breeches.

The Cardsharps

Caravaggio (Michelangelo Merisi)
Italian (1571–1610)
16th century
c. 1595
Oil on canvas
37 1/16 x 51 9/16 in. (94.2 x 130.9 cm)
AP 1987.06
Caravaggio was one of the pivotal figures in the history of Western art. In his short lifetime, he created a theatrical style that was as shocking to some as it was new, inspiring others to probe their subject matter for the drama of psychological relationships.
Temples in Eastern Kyoto is a six-fold screen which shows shows a portion of Higashiyama, the eastern hills that border the southern part of Kyoto. The main focus of the painting is the structure in the center, which appears to be the shrine-temple complex called Hokoku Jinja.
Temples in Eastern Kyoto
Temples in Eastern Kyoto
Temples in Eastern Kyoto is a six-fold screen which shows shows a portion of Higashiyama, the eastern hills that border the southern part of Kyoto. The main focus of the painting is the structure in the center, which appears to be the shrine-temple complex called Hokoku Jinja.

Temples in Eastern Kyoto

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615), Keicho era (1596–1615)
c. 1600
Six-fold screen; mineral pigments on gold
35 1/2 x 110 1/16 x 13/16 in. (90.2 x 279.5 x 2 cm)
AP 1986.10
In the Momoyama period, Kyoto emerged as a large urban center with a newly wealthy merchant class that developed a taste for paintings reflecting their vibrant, affluent lifestyle.

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