On View

Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure is a cylindrical incised vessel with a young lord seated upon a low, wooden-basketry throne draped with a fringed jaguar skin. He gestures toward the simply dressed seated figure on the ground
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure is a cylindrical incised vessel with a young lord seated upon a low, wooden-basketry throne draped with a fringed jaguar skin. He gestures toward the simply dressed seated figure on the ground

Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure

Mexico, Xcalumkin (Northern Lowlands), Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 765
Incised ceramic (fine grayware) with traces of red pigment
H. 9 in. (22.9 cm); Diam. 6 3/4 in. (17.2 cm)
AP 2000.04
This superbly incised Maya vessel depicts a young lord seated upon a low, wooden-basketry throne draped with a fringed jaguar skin. He is elaborately dressed in a luxurious fur or feather cape and wears a feathered headdress inside of which is perched a stuffed monkey.
The torso adorned in a simple skirt with a scarf across the chest and a long, elaborate necklace, represents a bodhisattva attendant to the Buddha
Bodhisattva Torso
Bodhisattva Torso
The torso adorned in a simple skirt with a scarf across the chest and a long, elaborate necklace, represents a bodhisattva attendant to the Buddha

Bodhisattva Torso

China, probably Shanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
c. 775–800
Stone, traces of gesso and pigment
39 x 12 15/16 x 8 in. (99 x 32.8 x 20.3 cm)
AP 1987.01
The evolution of Chinese Buddhist sculpture from archaic and columnar to fleshy and sensuous reached its culmination in the Tang dynasty, by which time Chinese Buddhist sculpture in the round shows a masterful adaptation of foreign Indian style to indigenous traditions.
Bodhisattva Torso is a bronze four-armed bodhisattva. He has a slender, bare body, clothed only in a short garment covering the loins
The Bodhisattva Maitreya
The Bodhisattva Maitreya
Bodhisattva Torso is a bronze four-armed bodhisattva. He has a slender, bare body, clothed only in a short garment covering the loins

The Bodhisattva Maitreya

Thailand, Prakhon Chai, Buriram province
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
Late 8th century A.D.
Bronze
48 1/4 x 20 1/16 x 12 3/8 in. (122.5 x 51 x 31.5 cm)
AP 1965.01
The earliest surviving Buddhist images in Southeast Asia, dating from the fourth and fifth centuries A.D., were the bronzes brought from India and Sri Lanka by merchants and monks. The first locally made images date to the sixth century and demonstrate that regional styles were already developing.
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler is a carved limestone relief with traces of paint. It depicts It depicts the presentation of captives in a palace throne room to a king and his military chief.
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler is a carved limestone relief with traces of paint. It depicts It depicts the presentation of captives in a palace throne room to a king and his military chief.

Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler

Mexico, Usumacinta River Valley, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 785
Limestone with traces of paint
45 3/8 x 35 in. (115.3 x 88.9 cm)
AP 1971.07
This carved relief probably served as a wall panel inside a Maya building or as a lintel over an entrance. It depicts the presentation of captives in a palace throne room, indicated by swag curtains at the top of the panel.
Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest
Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest

Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest

Japan
Heian period (794–1185)
11th century
Polychromed wood
19 1/4 x 16 1/8 x 12 5/8 in. (48.9 x 41 x 32 cm)
AP 1981.19
The Shinto god Hachiman has enjoyed special prominence throughout Japanese history. He was originally a local military guardian, protecting an agricultural and mining community in Usa.
Rain God Vessel is a polychromed ceramic  spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure, which is someone impersonating a deity. e holds a club in his right hand and has a shield attached to his left wrist; his entire head is engulfed in an animal-head helmet.
Rain God Vessel
Rain God Vessel
Rain God Vessel is a polychromed ceramic  spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure, which is someone impersonating a deity. e holds a club in his right hand and has a shield attached to his left wrist; his entire head is engulfed in an animal-head helmet.

Rain God Vessel

Mexico, Colima, El Chanal, Mixtec style
Middle Post Classic period (1200–1400)
c. 1100–1400
Polychromed ceramic
9 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (24.7 x 21 x 28.5 cm)
APx 1974.02
This spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure represents an important aspect of Mesoamerican religious practice—deity impersonation—by which the gods were brought directly into the world of experience. The disguise portrayed in this piece is a double one, however: warrior and rain god.
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara is a carved schist  stela, tin which the youthful, bejeweled figure is seated on a double-lotus throne, surrounded by lotus blossoms
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara is a carved schist  stela, tin which the youthful, bejeweled figure is seated on a double-lotus throne, surrounded by lotus blossoms

Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara

India, Bengal
Pala period (750–1174)
c. 11th–12th century
Gray schist
49 3/16 x 31 5/8 x 14 1/8 in. (124.9 x 80.3 x 35.9 cm)
AP 1970.13
The increasing complexity of imagery and iconographic detail in late Pala art paralleled the growing popularity of Esoteric Buddhism in eastern India.
Bowl Carved with Design of Boys Among Peonies made of porcelain with pale blue glaze
Bowl Carved with Design of Boys Among Peonies
Bowl Carved with Design of Boys Among Peonies
Bowl Carved with Design of Boys Among Peonies made of porcelain with pale blue glaze

Bowl Carved with Design of Boys Among Peonies

China, Jiangxi province
Southern Song dynasty (1127–1279)
12th century
Porcelain with pale blue glaze (Qingbai ware)
H. 3 in. (7.6 cm); Diam. 7 3/4 in. (19.7 cm)
AP 1995.07
Among the finest porcelain wares ever produced, qingbai (bluish white) constitutes one of the main groups of porcelain manufactured during the Song dynasty (A.D. 960–1279).
Detail of the carefully modeled face
Head, possibly a King
Head, possibly a King
Detail of the carefully modeled face

Head, possibly a King

Africa, Southwestern Nigeria, Ife culture
12th–14th century
Terracotta with residue of red pigment and traces of mica
10 1/2 x 5 11/16 x 7 3/8 in. (26.7 x 14.5 x 18.7 cm)
AP 1994.04
The art of Ife, which flourished from the twelfth to the fifteenth century in southwestern Nigeria, in the area occupied by the Yoruba people, is unique in Africa in representing human beings with extraordinary naturalism.
Buddha Enthroned is a bronze sculpture that depicts the Buddha seated on a pedastal in a superstructure surmounted by a flame pattern.
Buddha Enthroned
Buddha Enthroned
Buddha Enthroned is a bronze sculpture that depicts the Buddha seated on a pedastal in a superstructure surmounted by a flame pattern.

Buddha Enthroned

Thailand, Chaiyaphun province
Angkor period (802–1431)
c. 1180–1220
Bronze
69 3/16 x 25 7/8 x 16 1/4 in. (175.7 x 65.7 x 41.3 cm)
AP 1966.09
The identification of Buddhist monarchs with overt symbols of worldly wealth and power was characteristic of the time of the Angkor king Jayavarman VII (1181–c. 1218).
Detail of Vishnu attired in a richly draped and elaborately fastened skirt (dhoti), ornate jewelry, and a tall regal crown.
Vishnu
Vishnu
Detail of Vishnu attired in a richly draped and elaborately fastened skirt (dhoti), ornate jewelry, and a tall regal crown.

Vishnu

India
Chola period (c. 850–1310)
13th century
Bronze
33 3/4 x 13 3/8 x 12 7/8 in. (85.7 x 34 x 32.7 cm)
AG 1970.01
The Cholas originated a tradition of large-scale, cast-metal Hindu sculpture in the round. These sculptures were carried in ritual processions through the temple and adjoining precincts––the lugs and holes on the base were used for the insertion of poles to support the image.
Standing Shaka Buddha is a beautifully proportioned Gilt and lacquered wood sculpture of a Buddha. The Buddha stands on a pedastal as if moving forward. He is clothed in a gold deeply folded and decoratively draped robes.
Standing Shaka Buddha
Standing Shaka Buddha
Standing Shaka Buddha is a beautifully proportioned Gilt and lacquered wood sculpture of a Buddha. The Buddha stands on a pedastal as if moving forward. He is clothed in a gold deeply folded and decoratively draped robes.

Standing Shaka Buddha

Kaikei
Japanese (active c. 1185–1225)
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1210
Gilt and lacquered wood
54 7/16 x 19 1/4 x 13 1/2 in. (138.2 x 48.9 x 34.3 cm)
AP 1984.01 a,b,c
Kaikei, the great master sculptor of the Kamakura period (1185–1333), established the primary school of sculpture that produced statuary for the major temples in Nara and Kyoto.
Seated Nyoirin Kannon is a wood sculpture of a deity seated in a relaxed pose, resting on one of his six hands. His other hands hold a jewel, a lotus, and
Seated Nyoirin Kannon
Seated Nyoirin Kannon
Seated Nyoirin Kannon is a wood sculpture of a deity seated in a relaxed pose, resting on one of his six hands. His other hands hold a jewel, a lotus, and

Seated Nyoirin Kannon

Japan
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1230–50
Wood with traces of gilt and pigment
19 x 18 x 10 in. (48.3 x 45.7 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1985.15
Kannon is the Japanese name for the Indian Buddhist deity Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva of compassion. Because of the boundless love he offered to all beings, this was the most popular of all the Buddhist deities throughout Asia.
Seated En No Gyoja with staff and scroll. The eyes are fixed as if in a hypnotic gaze, and the mouth is open to expose the teeth and tongue, as if En no Gyoja were chanting the scriptures or delivering a lecture.
En no Gyoja
En no Gyoja
Seated En No Gyoja with staff and scroll. The eyes are fixed as if in a hypnotic gaze, and the mouth is open to expose the teeth and tongue, as if En no Gyoja were chanting the scriptures or delivering a lecture.

En no Gyoja

Japan
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1300–1375
Polychromed wood
54 15/16 x 32 x 26 in. (139.6 x 81.3 x 66 cm)
AP 1984.13
En no Gyoja was the legendary founder of the Shugendo sect, which emphasized the practice of religious austerities, and he thus came to represent the archetypical ascetic recluse. He is said to have died in the early eighth century after living a hermetic life in the mountains.
Seated Arhat is a cast iron depiction of monk representing an arhat. His face contrast with the simplified but rhythmical form of the body to produce a portrait of great character and presence.
Seated Arhat
Seated Arhat
Seated Arhat is a cast iron depiction of monk representing an arhat. His face contrast with the simplified but rhythmical form of the body to produce a portrait of great character and presence.

Seated Arhat

China, Shaanxi province
Late Yuan to early Ming dynasty (1279–1368/1368–1644)
c. 1300–1450
Cast iron, traces of pigment
30 11/16 x 19 7/8 x 16 in. (78 x 50.5 x 40.7 cm)
AP 1984.14
This engaging portrait of a monk represents an arhat (in Chinese, lohan), one of a group of “perfected beings” who, in the Buddhist faith, were the original disciples of Shakyamuni Buddha.
Twenty-Five Bodhisattvas Descending from Heaven made of two pairs of hanging scrolls un which twenty-five small music-making divinities, bejeweled and richly dressed in gold, float down from the heavens on diaphanous clouds.
Twenty-Five Bodhisattvas Descending from Heaven
Twenty-Five Bodhisattvas Descending from Heaven
Twenty-Five Bodhisattvas Descending from Heaven made of two pairs of hanging scrolls un which twenty-five small music-making divinities, bejeweled and richly dressed in gold, float down from the heavens on diaphanous clouds.

Twenty-Five Bodhisattvas Descending from Heaven

Japan
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1300
Pair of hanging scrolls; gold and mineral pigments on silk
39 x 15 3/4 in. each (99 x 40 cm each)
AP 1986.11 a,b
In this pair of paintings, twenty-five small music-making divinities, bejeweled and richly dressed in gold, float down from the heavens on diaphanous clouds. The divinities are bodhisattva attendants to Amida Buddha, who inspired in his followers the hope of eternal life in his Western Paradise.

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