On View

Reliquary Arm
Reliquary Arm

Reliquary Arm

French
12th century
c. 1150–1200 (crystal possibly added in the 15th century)
Silver, champlevé enamel on copper, gilt bronze, wood core, glass cabochons, and crystal
24 7/16 x 6 x 3 7/8 in. (62.1 x 15.3 x 9.9 cm)
AP 1979.25
The veneration of the physical remains of saints––or objects with which they had come into contact—began to be practiced during the Early Christian era. In A.D. 393, the Church decreed that every altar must have a relic.
Reliquary Casket
Reliquary Casket

Reliquary Casket

French
13th century
c. 1200–1220
Champlevé enamel on copper, wood core
8 7/8 x 9 1/2 x 4 1/8 in. (22.6 x 24.2 x 10.5 cm)
AP 1979.26
A major center of the manufacture and export of exquisitely crafted reliquaries in the Middle Ages was Limoges, located in southwestern France along several ecclesiastical and pilgrimage routes.
Vishnu
Vishnu

Vishnu

India
Chola period (c. 850–1310)
13th century
Bronze
33 3/4 x 13 3/8 x 12 7/8 in. (85.7 x 34 x 32.7 cm)
AG 1970.01
The Cholas originated a tradition of large-scale, cast-metal Hindu sculpture in the round. These sculptures were carried in ritual processions through the temple and adjoining precincts––the lugs and holes on the base were used for the insertion of poles to support the image.
Seated Arhat
Seated Arhat

Seated Arhat

China, Shaanxi province
Late Yuan to early Ming dynasty (1279–1368/1368–1644)
c. 1300–1450
Cast iron, traces of pigment
30 11/16 x 19 7/8 x 16 in. (78 x 50.5 x 40.7 cm)
AP 1984.14
This engaging portrait of a monk represents an arhat (in Chinese, lohan), one of a group of “perfected beings” who, in the Buddhist faith, were the original disciples of Shakyamuni Buddha.
Meiping Vase
Meiping Vase

Meiping Vase

China
Jiangxi province, Yuan dynasty (1279–1368)
first half of the 14th century
Porcelain with pale greenish blue glaze (Qingbai ware)
H. 12 1/2 in. (31.8 cm); Diam. 7 1/8 in. (18.1 cm)
AP 1968.08
Qingbai wares of the Yuan dynasty continue an earlier tradition of porcelain wares covered with a transparent glaze, which began as early as the tenth century. The name qingbai (bluish white) refers to the faint bluish tint of the glaze in areas where it thickens.
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus

The Raising of Lazarus

Duccio di Buoninsegna
Italian (active 1278–1318)
14th century
1310–11
Tempera and gold on panel
17 1/8 x 18 1/4 in. (43.5 x 46.4 cm) Framed: 20 7/8 x 22 1/8 x 1 7/8 in. (53 x 56.2 x 4.8 cm)
APx 1975.01
Duccio was the preeminent Sienese painter in the early years of the fourteenth century. He infused the prevailing Byzantine style with a more naturalistic, narrative mode.
Dish with Melon Design
Dish with Melon Design

Dish with Melon Design

China
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
early 15th century
Blue-and-white ware, porcelain, cobalt oxide pigment
H. 3 1/16 in. (7.7 cm); Diam. 17 1/16 in. (43.4 cm)
AP 1970.03
Porcelains of the Ming dynasty, namely the blue-and-white wares produced during the fifteenth century, begin a new chapter in the history of Chinese ceramic art.
Flat-Sided Flask
Flat-Sided Flask

Flat-Sided Flask

China, Jiangxi province, Jingdezhen
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
early 15th century
Porcelain with cobalt oxide pigment under transparent glaze
13 1/8 x 7 11/16 x 5 1/4 in. (33.3 x 19.5 x 13.3 cm)
AP 1968.11
This elegant porcelain of unusual form is a fine example of the technical and decorative excellence of Ming dynasty blue-and-white wares. The flat-sided flask is known in bronze vessels dating to the sixth century B.C.
Parvati
Parvati

Parvati

India
Vijayanagar period (1336–1565)
15th century
Bronze
35 11/16 x 10 15/16 x 9 5/8 in. (90.7 x 27.8 x 24.5 cm)
AP 1969.13
In the Hindu religion, Parvati, the consort of Shiva, is the archetypal mother goddess and fertility image. She benevolently mediates between the worshiper and the divine. This graceful sculpture represents the divinity as an ideal beauty.
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

Fra Angelico (Fra Giovanni da Fiesole)
Italian (c. 1395/1400–1455)
15th century
c. 1426–29
Tempera and gold on panel
10 9/16 x 9 3/8 in. (26.8 x 23.8 cm) Framed: 18 5/8 x 17 7/16 in. (47.3 x 44.3 cm)
AP 1986.03
Born Guido di Piero, the artist known as Fra Angelico acquired his nickname not long after his death, when he was referred to as “Angelicus” by a fellow Dominican monk for his pious life and artworks.
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Attributed to Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi)
Italian (1386/87–1466)
15th century
c. 1450
Terracotta
32 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (83.5 x 52.1 cm)
AP 2006.01
Celebrated for his powers of invention, range of expression, and technical prowess, Donatello was the preeminent Italian sculptor of the fifteenth century.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child

The Madonna and Child

Giovanni Bellini
Italian (c. 1438–1516)
15th century
c. 1465
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
32 1/2 x 23 in. (82.5 x 58.4 cm) Framed: 48 x 39 1/8 x 5 in. (121.9 x 99.4 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1971.06
Giovanni Bellini’s half-length devotional paintings of the Madonna and Child enjoyed great popularity in Venice, and later in his career he employed a large workshop to meet the demand.
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

Andrea Mantegna
Italian (c. 1430/31–1506)
15th century
c. 1485–88
Distemper, oil, and gold on canvas
24 3/4 x 20 3/16 in. (62.9 x 51.3 cm) Framed: 32 3/8 x 28 3/8 x 3 in. (82.2 x 72.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1987.04
Trained in the humanist university town of Padua, Andrea Mantegna developed a lifelong passion for antiquity that profoundly informed his work as an artist.
Portia and Brutus
Portia and Brutus

Portia and Brutus

Ercole de’ Roberti
Italian (c. 1455/56–1496)
15th century
c. 1486–90
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
19 3/16 x 13 1/2 in. (48.7 x 34.3 cm) Framed: 25 3/4 x 20 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (65.4 x 52.1 x 5.7 cm)
AP 1986.05
Ercole de’ Roberti spent the latter half of his career at the court of Ercole I d’Este, Duke of Ferrara, painting altarpieces, small devotional works, portraits, and fresco cycles for the Este residences, as well as decorative projects.
Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child

South Germany
15th century
15th century
1486
Silver, parcel-gilt, stones (opal, clear and pale sapphires, garnets, and pale emeralds)
21 × 6 3/4 × 6 3/4 in. (53.3 × 17.1 × 17.1 cm)
AP 2002.03
The subject of this rare example of Late Gothic church sculpture can be identified as the Virgin of the Apocalypse, whose imagery—the aureole of the sun, along with the twelve stars in her crown, and the crescent moon beneath her—is derived from the book of Revelation (12:1–5): “And there appeared a
The Torment of Saint Anthony
The Torment of Saint Anthony

The Torment of Saint Anthony

Michelangelo Buonarroti
Italian (1475–1564)
15th century
c. 1487-88
Tempera and oil on panel
18 1/2 x 13 3/4 in. (47 x 34.9 cm) Framed: 27 x 22 3/8 x 2 1/4 in. (68.6 x 56.8 x 5.7 cm)
AP 2009.01
This is the first known painting by Michelangelo, described by his earliest biographers and believed to have been painted when he was twelve or thirteen years old.

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