On View

Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest
Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest

Hachiman in the Guise of a Buddhist Priest

Japan
Heian period (794–1185)
11th century
Polychromed wood
19 1/4 x 16 1/8 x 12 5/8 in. (48.9 x 41 x 32 cm)
AP 1981.19
The Shinto god Hachiman has enjoyed special prominence throughout Japanese history. He was originally a local military guardian, protecting an agricultural and mining community in Usa.
Rain God Vessel is a polychromed ceramic  spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure, which is someone impersonating a deity. e holds a club in his right hand and has a shield attached to his left wrist; his entire head is engulfed in an animal-head helmet.
Rain God Vessel
Rain God Vessel
Rain God Vessel is a polychromed ceramic  spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure, which is someone impersonating a deity. e holds a club in his right hand and has a shield attached to his left wrist; his entire head is engulfed in an animal-head helmet.

Rain God Vessel

Mexico, Colima, El Chanal, Mixtec style
Middle Post Classic period (1200–1400)
c. 1100–1400
Polychromed ceramic
9 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (24.7 x 21 x 28.5 cm)
APx 1974.02
This spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure represents an important aspect of Mesoamerican religious practice—deity impersonation—by which the gods were brought directly into the world of experience. The disguise portrayed in this piece is a double one, however: warrior and rain god.
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara is a carved schist  stela, tin which the youthful, bejeweled figure is seated on a double-lotus throne, surrounded by lotus blossoms
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara
Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara is a carved schist  stela, tin which the youthful, bejeweled figure is seated on a double-lotus throne, surrounded by lotus blossoms

Bodhisattva Khasarpana Lokeshvara

India, Bengal
Pala period (750–1174)
c. 11th–12th century
Gray schist
49 3/16 x 31 5/8 x 14 1/8 in. (124.9 x 80.3 x 35.9 cm)
AP 1970.13
The increasing complexity of imagery and iconographic detail in late Pala art paralleled the growing popularity of Esoteric Buddhism in eastern India.
Detail of the carefully modeled face
Head, possibly a King
Head, possibly a King
Detail of the carefully modeled face

Head, possibly a King

Africa, Southwestern Nigeria, Ife culture
12th–14th century
Terracotta with residue of red pigment and traces of mica
10 1/2 x 5 11/16 x 7 3/8 in. (26.7 x 14.5 x 18.7 cm)
AP 1994.04
The art of Ife, which flourished from the twelfth to the fifteenth century in southwestern Nigeria, in the area occupied by the Yoruba people, is unique in Africa in representing human beings with extraordinary naturalism.
Buddha Enthroned is a bronze sculpture that depicts the Buddha seated on a pedastal in a superstructure surmounted by a flame pattern.
Buddha Enthroned
Buddha Enthroned
Buddha Enthroned is a bronze sculpture that depicts the Buddha seated on a pedastal in a superstructure surmounted by a flame pattern.

Buddha Enthroned

Thailand, Chaiyaphun province
Angkor period (802–1431)
c. 1180–1220
Bronze
69 3/16 x 25 7/8 x 16 1/4 in. (175.7 x 65.7 x 41.3 cm)
AP 1966.09
The identification of Buddhist monarchs with overt symbols of worldly wealth and power was characteristic of the time of the Angkor king Jayavarman VII (1181–c. 1218).
Standing Shaka Buddha is a beautifully proportioned Gilt and lacquered wood sculpture of a Buddha. The Buddha stands on a pedastal as if moving forward. He is clothed in a gold deeply folded and decoratively draped robes.
Standing Shaka Buddha
Standing Shaka Buddha
Standing Shaka Buddha is a beautifully proportioned Gilt and lacquered wood sculpture of a Buddha. The Buddha stands on a pedastal as if moving forward. He is clothed in a gold deeply folded and decoratively draped robes.

Standing Shaka Buddha

Kaikei
Japanese (active c. 1185–1225)
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1210
Gilt and lacquered wood
54 7/16 x 19 1/4 x 13 1/2 in. (138.2 x 48.9 x 34.3 cm)
AP 1984.01 a,b,c
Kaikei, the great master sculptor of the Kamakura period (1185–1333), established the primary school of sculpture that produced statuary for the major temples in Nara and Kyoto.
Seated Nyoirin Kannon is a wood sculpture of a deity seated in a relaxed pose, resting on one of his six hands. His other hands hold a jewel, a lotus, and
Seated Nyoirin Kannon
Seated Nyoirin Kannon
Seated Nyoirin Kannon is a wood sculpture of a deity seated in a relaxed pose, resting on one of his six hands. His other hands hold a jewel, a lotus, and

Seated Nyoirin Kannon

Japan
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1230–50
Wood with traces of gilt and pigment
19 x 18 x 10 in. (48.3 x 45.7 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1985.15
Kannon is the Japanese name for the Indian Buddhist deity Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva of compassion. Because of the boundless love he offered to all beings, this was the most popular of all the Buddhist deities throughout Asia.
Seated En No Gyoja with staff and scroll. The eyes are fixed as if in a hypnotic gaze, and the mouth is open to expose the teeth and tongue, as if En no Gyoja were chanting the scriptures or delivering a lecture.
En no Gyoja
En no Gyoja
Seated En No Gyoja with staff and scroll. The eyes are fixed as if in a hypnotic gaze, and the mouth is open to expose the teeth and tongue, as if En no Gyoja were chanting the scriptures or delivering a lecture.

En no Gyoja

Japan
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1300–1375
Polychromed wood
54 15/16 x 32 x 26 in. (139.6 x 81.3 x 66 cm)
AP 1984.13
En no Gyoja was the legendary founder of the Shugendo sect, which emphasized the practice of religious austerities, and he thus came to represent the archetypical ascetic recluse. He is said to have died in the early eighth century after living a hermetic life in the mountains.
Seated Arhat is a cast iron depiction of monk representing an arhat. His face contrast with the simplified but rhythmical form of the body to produce a portrait of great character and presence.
Seated Arhat
Seated Arhat
Seated Arhat is a cast iron depiction of monk representing an arhat. His face contrast with the simplified but rhythmical form of the body to produce a portrait of great character and presence.

Seated Arhat

China, Shaanxi province
Late Yuan to early Ming dynasty (1279–1368/1368–1644)
c. 1300–1450
Cast iron, traces of pigment
30 11/16 x 19 7/8 x 16 in. (78 x 50.5 x 40.7 cm)
AP 1984.14
This engaging portrait of a monk represents an arhat (in Chinese, lohan), one of a group of “perfected beings” who, in the Buddhist faith, were the original disciples of Shakyamuni Buddha.
The Raising of Lazarus shows the moment when Jesus called Lazarus forth from the tomb in tempera and gold on panel
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus shows the moment when Jesus called Lazarus forth from the tomb in tempera and gold on panel

The Raising of Lazarus

Duccio di Buoninsegna
Italian (active 1278–1318)
14th century
1310–11
Tempera and gold on panel
17 1/8 x 18 1/4 in. (43.5 x 46.4 cm) Framed: 20 7/8 x 22 1/8 x 1 7/8 in. (53 x 56.2 x 4.8 cm)
APx 1975.01
Duccio was the preeminent Sienese painter in the early years of the fourteenth century. He infused the prevailing Byzantine style with a more naturalistic, narrative mode.
Parvati is a bronze standing sculpture representing the divinity as an ideal beauty on a pedestal
Parvati
Parvati
Parvati is a bronze standing sculpture representing the divinity as an ideal beauty on a pedestal

Parvati

India
Vijayanagar period (1336–1565)
15th century
Bronze
35 11/16 x 10 15/16 x 9 5/8 in. (90.7 x 27.8 x 24.5 cm)
AP 1969.13
In the Hindu religion, Parvati, the consort of Shiva, is the archetypal mother goddess and fertility image. She benevolently mediates between the worshiper and the divine. This graceful sculpture represents the divinity as an ideal beauty.
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes is made of tempera and gold on panel. Notable is the use of pure pigments, such as vermilion and lapis lazuli and gilded decorative borders of the drapery
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes is made of tempera and gold on panel. Notable is the use of pure pigments, such as vermilion and lapis lazuli and gilded decorative borders of the drapery

The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

Fra Angelico (Fra Giovanni da Fiesole)
Italian (c. 1395/1400–1455)
15th century
c. 1426–29
Tempera and gold on panel
10 9/16 x 9 3/8 in. (26.8 x 23.8 cm) Framed: 18 5/8 x 17 7/16 in. (47.3 x 44.3 cm)
AP 1986.03
Born Guido di Piero, the artist known as Fra Angelico acquired his nickname not long after his death, when he was referred to as “Angelicus” by a fellow Dominican monk for his pious life and artworks.
In Four Mandalas of the Vajravali Series, the Thangka depicts four individual mandalas  incorporated into an all-encompassing mandala of the Five Pancharaksha Goddesses
Four Mandalas of the Vajravali Series
Four Mandalas of the Vajravali Series
In Four Mandalas of the Vajravali Series, the Thangka depicts four individual mandalas  incorporated into an all-encompassing mandala of the Five Pancharaksha Goddesses

Four Mandalas of the Vajravali Series

Central Tibet, Tsang (Ngor Monastery), Sakya order
c. 1429–56
Thangka, gouache on cotton
35 x 29 in. (88.9 x 73.7 cm)
AP 2000.01
Most Tibetan art was created in connection with the complex rituals and meditational practices of Vajrayana Buddhism (the Diamond Path), in which mandalas (cosmic diagrams) are employed as visual representations of the sacred realms inhabited by a host of deities.
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna) is a terracotta relief of the Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna) is a terracotta relief of the Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Attributed to Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi)
Italian (1386/87–1466)
15th century
c. 1450
Terracotta
32 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (83.5 x 52.1 cm)
AP 2006.01
Celebrated for his powers of invention, range of expression, and technical prowess, Donatello was the preeminent Italian sculptor of the fifteenth century.
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist is a devotional painting which places Madonna and Child in the center of the composition
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist is a devotional painting which places Madonna and Child in the center of the composition

The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

Andrea Mantegna
Italian (c. 1430/31–1506)
15th century
c. 1485–88
Distemper, oil, and gold on canvas
24 3/4 x 20 3/16 in. (62.9 x 51.3 cm) Framed: 32 3/8 x 28 3/8 x 3 in. (82.2 x 72.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1987.04
Trained in the humanist university town of Padua, Andrea Mantegna developed a lifelong passion for antiquity that profoundly informed his work as an artist.
Portia and Brutus is a panel in a series by Ercole de’ Roberti of virtuous women. In the painting, Portia shows Brutus a self-inflicted wound  to confirm that she would be ready to endure death
Portia and Brutus
Portia and Brutus
Portia and Brutus is a panel in a series by Ercole de’ Roberti of virtuous women. In the painting, Portia shows Brutus a self-inflicted wound  to confirm that she would be ready to endure death

Portia and Brutus

Ercole de’ Roberti
Italian (c. 1455/56–1496)
15th century
c. 1486–90
Tempera, possibly oil, and gold on panel
19 3/16 x 13 1/2 in. (48.7 x 34.3 cm) Framed: 25 3/4 x 20 1/2 x 2 1/4 in. (65.4 x 52.1 x 5.7 cm)
AP 1986.05
Ercole de’ Roberti spent the latter half of his career at the court of Ercole I d’Este, Duke of Ferrara, painting altarpieces, small devotional works, portraits, and fresco cycles for the Este residences, as well as decorative projects.

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