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Haniwa Seated Man is a clay is hollow clay cylinders that was placed in a mound covering a Japanese royal tomb. The seated man with a mask-like face is seated on a platform. He has short legs and rounded, tubelike arms
Haniwa Seated Man
Haniwa Seated Man
Haniwa Seated Man is a clay is hollow clay cylinders that was placed in a mound covering a Japanese royal tomb. The seated man with a mask-like face is seated on a platform. He has short legs and rounded, tubelike arms

Haniwa Seated Man

Japan, Ibaraki prefecture, Kashima, Hokota site
Kofun period (248–646)
c. A.D. 500
Low-fired clay with cinnabar pigment
29 15/16 x 10 5/8 in. (76 x 27 cm)
AP 1972.02
Haniwa, which means “circle (or tube) of clay,” is the term given to large numbers of hollow clay cylinders that were placed in and around the bases of large earthen mounds covering Japanese royal tombs.
Vessel with a Mythological Frieze is a tall painted Maya vessel depicting two renderings of the aged supreme deity Itzamna, the god of heaven and sun for the Yucatec Maya.
Vessel with a Mythological Frieze
Vessel with a Mythological Frieze
Vessel with a Mythological Frieze is a tall painted Maya vessel depicting two renderings of the aged supreme deity Itzamna, the god of heaven and sun for the Yucatec Maya.

Vessel with a Mythological Frieze

Possibly Guatemala or Belize, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 550–950
Polychromed ceramic
H. 10 13/16 in. (27.5 cm); Diam. 5 5/16 in. (13.5 cm)
AP 2004.02
This tall vessel is skillfully painted with a unique mythological frieze depicting two renderings of the aged supreme deity Itzamna, the god of heaven and sun for the Yucatec Maya.
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa is an earthenware jar with traces of paint. The jar is deocrated with  a band of lotus roundels above a band of monster masks, both in relief.
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa
Jar in the Shape of a Stupa is an earthenware jar with traces of paint. The jar is deocrated with  a band of lotus roundels above a band of monster masks, both in relief.

Jar in the Shape of a Stupa

China, Shaanxi, Shandong, or Henan province
Northern Qi period or Sui dynasty (550–577/581–618)
Late 6th or early 7th century
Earthenware with traces of painted polychrome pigment
19 1/4 in. (48.9 cm)
AP 1994.06 a,b,c
This unusual pottery jar illustrates the early assimilation of Buddhist motifs to the decoration of Chinese mortuary objects.
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket is a ceramic and white slip sculpture of a smiling girl with enlivening hand-modeled details, filed front teeth, lively smile, and broadly sculpted costume.
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket is a ceramic and white slip sculpture of a smiling girl with enlivening hand-modeled details, filed front teeth, lively smile, and broadly sculpted costume.

Smiling Girl Holding a Basket

Mexico, central Veracruz, Nopiloa style
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 600–750
Ceramic with white slip and traces of paint
7 9/16 x 6 1/8 x 3 3/4 in. (19.2 x 15.5 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1978.01
Among numerous regional variations, hollow modeled figures from the Veracruz area of the Gulf Coast are noted for their typical smiling facial expressions and the great care given to the slightest details of ornament and attire.
Detail of Standing Buddha Shakyamuni's body and head. The smooth, fleshy contours of the body are revealed by a thin, clinging garment with cascading pleats delineated into a threadlike surface design. His hand is held in a gesture of charity.
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Detail of Standing Buddha Shakyamuni's body and head. The smooth, fleshy contours of the body are revealed by a thin, clinging garment with cascading pleats delineated into a threadlike surface design. His hand is held in a gesture of charity.

Standing Buddha Shakyamuni

Nepal
Licchavi period (400-750)
7th century
Gilded copper
19 3/4 x 8 x 3 3/8 in. (50.2 x 20.3 x 8.6 cm)
AP 1979.01
This slim, richly gilded figure represents the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, Sage of the Shakya clan.
Court Lady is an animated and charming earthenware funerary sculpture representing one of the court's ladies. She wears long robes, a white jacket, and upturned shoes.
Court Lady
Court Lady
Court Lady is an animated and charming earthenware funerary sculpture representing one of the court's ladies. She wears long robes, a white jacket, and upturned shoes.

Court Lady

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
16 5/16 x 7 1/16 x 6 3/8 in. (41.5 x 18 x 16.2 cm)
AP 2001.01
One of the most engaging and distinctive groups of Tang funerary sculpture is the one representing ladies of the court. This animated and charming example stands in a gracefully swayed pose, her petite hands held in a conversational gesture in front of her swelling form.
The Kimbell’s Earth Spirit stands in a rampant posture of conquest as it subdues a snarling beast upon a rockwork base, its left arm entwined with a serpent. The spirit’s triple horns, bulging eyes, and bare-teethed grimace add to its ferocious appearance.
Earth Spirit
Earth Spirit
The Kimbell’s Earth Spirit stands in a rampant posture of conquest as it subdues a snarling beast upon a rockwork base, its left arm entwined with a serpent. The spirit’s triple horns, bulging eyes, and bare-teethed grimace add to its ferocious appearance.

Earth Spirit

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
31 1/8 x 7 9/16 x 11 1/4 in. (79.1 x 19.2 x 28.5 cm)
AP 2001.02
The inclusion of fantastic animal guardians as part of the retinue of tomb figures began in the Northern Wei dynasty (A.D. 386–534) and continued into the Tang dynasty.
Detail of torso and chest of Harihara with almond-shaped eyes, delicately traced brows, and subtly molded lips and nose have the particularity of portraiture, an individualized treatment that may represent the royal patron who commissioned the sculpture.
Harihara
Harihara
Detail of torso and chest of Harihara with almond-shaped eyes, delicately traced brows, and subtly molded lips and nose have the particularity of portraiture, an individualized treatment that may represent the royal patron who commissioned the sculpture.

Harihara

Cambodia, Kompong Cham, style of Prasat Andet
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
c. 675–700
Stone
45 1/2 x 20 7/8 x 11 in. (115.6 x 53 x 28 cm)
AP 1988.01
The Khmer kingdom controlled Cambodia as well as large areas of Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos from the sixth to the fifteenth centuries.
Ceramic Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross. This censer stand is sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads with sides  decorated with a variety of motifs that include (from top to bottom) jewels with bird-shaped heads and ribbons, stylized crocodile ears, crossed and knotted bands, and ornamented ear spools. Traces of the original blue, red, and white pigments are still present.
Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross
Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross
Ceramic Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross. This censer stand is sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads with sides  decorated with a variety of motifs that include (from top to bottom) jewels with bird-shaped heads and ribbons, stylized crocodile ears, crossed and knotted bands, and ornamented ear spools. Traces of the original blue, red, and white pigments are still present.

Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross

Mexico, Usumacinta region, Chiapas, Palenque, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600-900)
c. A.D. 690-720
Ceramic with traces of pigments
44 7/8 × 21 1/2 × 11 1/2 in. (114 × 54.6 × 29.2 cm)
AP 2013.02
Monumental ceramic censer stands are some of the finest and largest freestanding sculptures created by Maya artists.
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld, which is  sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads, all Maya deities.
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld, which is  sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads, all Maya deities.

Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld

Mexico, Usumacinta region, Chiapas, Palenque, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600-900)
c. A.D. 690-720
Ceramic with traces of pigments
44 × 22 × 12 1/4 in. (111.8 × 55.9 × 31.1 cm)
AP 2013.01
Monumental ceramic censer stands are some of the finest and largest freestanding sculptures created by Maya artists.
Vessel with Ceremonial Scene is a ceramic Maya vessel depicting a palace ceremony. The Maya lord wears an elaborate bird headdress as a servant kneels before him.
Vessel with Ceremonial Scene
Vessel with Ceremonial Scene
Vessel with Ceremonial Scene is a ceramic Maya vessel depicting a palace ceremony. The Maya lord wears an elaborate bird headdress as a servant kneels before him.

Vessel with Ceremonial Scene

Mexico, Campeche, Jaina Island (?), Maya culture, Chocholá style
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 690–750
Carved ceramic with traces of pigment
H. 8 1/8 in. (20.7 cm); Diam. 6 13/16 in. (17.3 cm)
APx 1974.04
The scene on this vessel appears to depict a ritual that is being enacted in a sumptuous palace interior, indicated by the swagged curtain framing the top of the scene.
Stela with a Ruler is a carved stone slab monument K’inich B’alam (Sun-Faced Jaguar), ruler of El Perú. The mosaic mask represents a jeweled serpent, and the round shield he grasps in his left hand emphasizes the war role of Maya rulers.
Stela with a Ruler
Stela with a Ruler
Stela with a Ruler is a carved stone slab monument K’inich B’alam (Sun-Faced Jaguar), ruler of El Perú. The mosaic mask represents a jeweled serpent, and the round shield he grasps in his left hand emphasizes the war role of Maya rulers.

Stela with a Ruler

Guatemala, Petén region, El Peru, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 692
Limestone
107 3/8 x 68 3/8 in. (272.7 x 173.7 cm)
AP 1970.02
The Maya were prolific makers of carved stone-slab monuments, or stelae, which were normally set up within architectural complexes and most often portray specific, named individuals who were members of the hereditary dynasties that ruled Maya city-states.
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Pawahtun Instructing Scribes is a vessel which depicts two scenes with the deity Pawahtun, a principal god of Maya scribes, in animated lessons with young disciples.
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Itzam Instructing Young Pupils
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Itzam Instructing Young Pupils
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Pawahtun Instructing Scribes is a vessel which depicts two scenes with the deity Pawahtun, a principal god of Maya scribes, in animated lessons with young disciples.

Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Itzam Instructing Young Pupils

Possibly Mexico or Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 700–750
Ceramic with monochrome decoration
H. 3 3/4 (9.5 cm); Diam. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm)
AP 2004.04
This celebrated vessel depicts two scenes with the Itzam, an elderly deity associated with creation and atlantean roles, in animated lessons with four young pupils. The Itzam is recognizable by his aged features and his netted headdress with a brush wedged into the ties.
Pendant: Twin Warriors is a gold pendant depicting a pair of standing bat-human figures hold paddle-shaped clubs in their outer hands. Saurian heads hang from their waistbands.
Pendant: Twin Warriors
Pendant: Twin Warriors
Pendant: Twin Warriors is a gold pendant depicting a pair of standing bat-human figures hold paddle-shaped clubs in their outer hands. Saurian heads hang from their waistbands.

Pendant: Twin Warriors

Panama, Azuero Peninsula, Conte Style
Late Classic to Postclassic period (600–1521)
c. 700–1200
Gold
3 1/4 x 4 13/16 x 1 in. (8.2 x 12.2 x 2.5 cm) Weight: 0.63 lb. (286.8 g)
AP 1979.23
The art of casting elaborate designs in gold had emerged in Panama by the middle of the first millennium A.D.; regional schools excelled in the techniques of cast and beaten gold.
Pendant: Two Deer Heads is a gold pendant with two dear heads and a pair of outward-facing profile heads of an important deity, a crested saurian, above the deer.
Pendant: Two Deer Heads
Pendant: Two Deer Heads
Pendant: Two Deer Heads is a gold pendant with two dear heads and a pair of outward-facing profile heads of an important deity, a crested saurian, above the deer.

Pendant: Two Deer Heads

Panama, Azuero Peninsula, Conte Style
Late Classic to Postclassic period (600–1521)
c. 700–1200
Gold
2 13/16 x 4 11/16 x 1 in. (7.2 x 11.9 x 2.5 cm) Weight: 0.42 lb. (188.4 g)
AP 1979.24
The art of casting elaborate designs in gold had emerged in Panama by the middle of the first millennium a.d.; regional schools excelled in the techniques of cast and beaten gold.
Vessel with a Ball Game Scene is a Maya ceramic vessel depicting a prince with a headdress with his rand resting on a ball during the game.
Vessel with a Ball Game Scene
Vessel with a Ball Game Scene
Vessel with a Ball Game Scene is a Maya ceramic vessel depicting a prince with a headdress with his rand resting on a ball during the game.

Vessel with a Ball Game Scene

Mexico or Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 700–800
Polychromed ceramic
H. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm); Diam. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm)
AP 1989.05
The figures on Vessel with a Ball Game Scene are engaged in a ritual ball game commonly played in Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900) Maya cities. The protective ball game equipment includes a heavy wood-and-leather belt and knee pad.

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