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Smiling Girl Holding a Basket is a ceramic and white slip sculpture of a smiling girl with enlivening hand-modeled details, filed front teeth, lively smile, and broadly sculpted costume.
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket
Smiling Girl Holding a Basket is a ceramic and white slip sculpture of a smiling girl with enlivening hand-modeled details, filed front teeth, lively smile, and broadly sculpted costume.

Smiling Girl Holding a Basket

Mexico, central Veracruz, Nopiloa style
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 600–750
Ceramic with white slip and traces of paint
7 9/16 x 6 1/8 x 3 3/4 in. (19.2 x 15.5 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1978.01
Among numerous regional variations, hollow modeled figures from the Veracruz area of the Gulf Coast are noted for their typical smiling facial expressions and the great care given to the slightest details of ornament and attire.
Amphora-Shaped Vase is Chinese variation of a Hellenistic vase with looped handles, finely crackled, almost colorless glaze that separates the glossy upper body from the unglazed portion below.
Amphora-Shaped Vase
Amphora-Shaped Vase
Amphora-Shaped Vase is Chinese variation of a Hellenistic vase with looped handles, finely crackled, almost colorless glaze that separates the glossy upper body from the unglazed portion below.

Amphora-Shaped Vase

China, probably Hebei province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
7th or 8th century A.D.
Stoneware with transparent glaze
H. 14 7/8 in. (37.8 cm); Diam. 7 5/8 in. (19.4 cm)
AP 1969.16
The amphora shape of this vase, modeled after Hellenistic prototypes, has been translated into Chinese idiom by the use of a single color glaze and the substitution of dragon handles for the ordinary loop variety.
Detail of Standing Buddha Shakyamuni's body and head. The smooth, fleshy contours of the body are revealed by a thin, clinging garment with cascading pleats delineated into a threadlike surface design. His hand is held in a gesture of charity.
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Detail of Standing Buddha Shakyamuni's body and head. The smooth, fleshy contours of the body are revealed by a thin, clinging garment with cascading pleats delineated into a threadlike surface design. His hand is held in a gesture of charity.

Standing Buddha Shakyamuni

Nepal
Licchavi period (400-750)
7th century
Gilded copper
19 3/4 x 8 x 3 3/8 in. (50.2 x 20.3 x 8.6 cm)
AP 1979.01
This slim, richly gilded figure represents the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, Sage of the Shakya clan.
Court Lady is an animated and charming earthenware funerary sculpture representing one of the court's ladies. She wears long robes, a white jacket, and upturned shoes.
Court Lady
Court Lady
Court Lady is an animated and charming earthenware funerary sculpture representing one of the court's ladies. She wears long robes, a white jacket, and upturned shoes.

Court Lady

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
16 5/16 x 7 1/16 x 6 3/8 in. (41.5 x 18 x 16.2 cm)
AP 2001.01
One of the most engaging and distinctive groups of Tang funerary sculpture is the one representing ladies of the court. This animated and charming example stands in a gracefully swayed pose, her petite hands held in a conversational gesture in front of her swelling form.
Detail of torso and chest of Harihara with almond-shaped eyes, delicately traced brows, and subtly molded lips and nose have the particularity of portraiture, an individualized treatment that may represent the royal patron who commissioned the sculpture.
Harihara
Harihara
Detail of torso and chest of Harihara with almond-shaped eyes, delicately traced brows, and subtly molded lips and nose have the particularity of portraiture, an individualized treatment that may represent the royal patron who commissioned the sculpture.

Harihara

Cambodia, Kompong Cham, style of Prasat Andet
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
c. 675–700
Stone
45 1/2 x 20 7/8 x 11 in. (115.6 x 53 x 28 cm)
AP 1988.01
The Khmer kingdom controlled Cambodia as well as large areas of Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos from the sixth to the fifteenth centuries.
Ceramic Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross. This censer stand is sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads with sides  decorated with a variety of motifs that include (from top to bottom) jewels with bird-shaped heads and ribbons, stylized crocodile ears, crossed and knotted bands, and ornamented ear spools. Traces of the original blue, red, and white pigments are still present.
Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross
Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross
Ceramic Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross. This censer stand is sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads with sides  decorated with a variety of motifs that include (from top to bottom) jewels with bird-shaped heads and ribbons, stylized crocodile ears, crossed and knotted bands, and ornamented ear spools. Traces of the original blue, red, and white pigments are still present.

Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross

Mexico, Usumacinta region, Chiapas, Palenque, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600-900)
c. A.D. 690-720
Ceramic with traces of pigments
44 7/8 × 21 1/2 × 11 1/2 in. (114 × 54.6 × 29.2 cm)
AP 2013.02
Monumental ceramic censer stands are some of the finest and largest freestanding sculptures created by Maya artists.
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld, which is  sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads, all Maya deities.
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld, which is  sculpted with a vertical tier of five heads, all Maya deities.

Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld

Mexico, Usumacinta region, Chiapas, Palenque, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600-900)
c. A.D. 690-720
Ceramic with traces of pigments
44 × 22 × 12 1/4 in. (111.8 × 55.9 × 31.1 cm)
AP 2013.01
Monumental ceramic censer stands are some of the finest and largest freestanding sculptures created by Maya artists.
Stela with a Ruler is a carved stone slab monument K’inich B’alam (Sun-Faced Jaguar), ruler of El Perú. The mosaic mask represents a jeweled serpent, and the round shield he grasps in his left hand emphasizes the war role of Maya rulers.
Stela with a Ruler
Stela with a Ruler
Stela with a Ruler is a carved stone slab monument K’inich B’alam (Sun-Faced Jaguar), ruler of El Perú. The mosaic mask represents a jeweled serpent, and the round shield he grasps in his left hand emphasizes the war role of Maya rulers.

Stela with a Ruler

Guatemala, Petén region, El Peru, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 692
Limestone
107 3/8 x 68 3/8 in. (272.7 x 173.7 cm)
AP 1970.02
The Maya were prolific makers of carved stone-slab monuments, or stelae, which were normally set up within architectural complexes and most often portray specific, named individuals who were members of the hereditary dynasties that ruled Maya city-states.
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Pawahtun Instructing Scribes is a vessel which depicts two scenes with the deity Pawahtun, a principal god of Maya scribes, in animated lessons with young disciples.
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Itzam Instructing Young Pupils
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Itzam Instructing Young Pupils
Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Pawahtun Instructing Scribes is a vessel which depicts two scenes with the deity Pawahtun, a principal god of Maya scribes, in animated lessons with young disciples.

Codex-Style Vessel with Two Scenes of Itzam Instructing Young Pupils

Possibly Mexico or Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 700–750
Ceramic with monochrome decoration
H. 3 3/4 (9.5 cm); Diam. 4 1/8 in. (10.5 cm)
AP 2004.04
This celebrated vessel depicts two scenes with the Itzam, an elderly deity associated with creation and atlantean roles, in animated lessons with four young pupils. The Itzam is recognizable by his aged features and his netted headdress with a brush wedged into the ties.
Vessel of the Ik Dancer is a Maya cylindrical ceramic vessel with Fat Cacique is comfortably seated on a bench with a huge jaguar pillow, while two attendants tend to him. Three warriors dance in a blood-letting ritual on the opposite side of the vessel
Vessel of the Ik’ Dancer
Vessel of the Ik’ Dancer
Vessel of the Ik Dancer is a Maya cylindrical ceramic vessel with Fat Cacique is comfortably seated on a bench with a huge jaguar pillow, while two attendants tend to him. Three warriors dance in a blood-letting ritual on the opposite side of the vessel

Vessel of the Ik’ Dancer

Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 750
Polychromed ceramic
H. 8 3/4 in. (22.3 cm); Diam. 4 3/8 in. (11.1 cm)
AP 1985.10
This vessel depicts a Maya lord nicknamed the Fat Cacique, ruler of the Ik’ polity. The action of the scene is divided between the interior and exterior of a palace building raised on a low platform with two steps.
Vessel with a Procession of Warriors is a cylindrical Maya ceramic vessel depicting a parade of warriors after a battle.
Vessel with a Procession of Warriors
Vessel with a Procession of Warriors
Vessel with a Procession of Warriors is a cylindrical Maya ceramic vessel depicting a parade of warriors after a battle.

Vessel with a Procession of Warriors

Mexico, Usumacinta River Valley, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 750–850
Polychromed ceramic
H. 6 5/16 in. (16 cm); Diam. 6 5/16 in. (16 cm)
APx 1976.16
This vessel depicts a parade of warriors after a battle. The naked figure is a captive who is being led by an elaborately dressed warrior for sacrificial display. The leader of the party may be the figure wearing a full jaguar pelt and wielding a bloody weapon.
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure is a cylindrical incised vessel with a young lord seated upon a low, wooden-basketry throne draped with a fringed jaguar skin. He gestures toward the simply dressed seated figure on the ground
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure
Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure is a cylindrical incised vessel with a young lord seated upon a low, wooden-basketry throne draped with a fringed jaguar skin. He gestures toward the simply dressed seated figure on the ground

Vessel with an Enthroned Lord and Seated Figure

Mexico, Xcalumkin (Northern Lowlands), Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 765
Incised ceramic (fine grayware) with traces of red pigment
H. 9 in. (22.9 cm); Diam. 6 3/4 in. (17.2 cm)
AP 2000.04
This superbly incised Maya vessel depicts a young lord seated upon a low, wooden-basketry throne draped with a fringed jaguar skin. He is elaborately dressed in a luxurious fur or feather cape and wears a feathered headdress inside of which is perched a stuffed monkey.
The torso adorned in a simple skirt with a scarf across the chest and a long, elaborate necklace, represents a bodhisattva attendant to the Buddha
Bodhisattva Torso
Bodhisattva Torso
The torso adorned in a simple skirt with a scarf across the chest and a long, elaborate necklace, represents a bodhisattva attendant to the Buddha

Bodhisattva Torso

China, probably Shanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
c. 775–800
Stone, traces of gesso and pigment
39 x 12 15/16 x 8 in. (99 x 32.8 x 20.3 cm)
AP 1987.01
The evolution of Chinese Buddhist sculpture from archaic and columnar to fleshy and sensuous reached its culmination in the Tang dynasty, by which time Chinese Buddhist sculpture in the round shows a masterful adaptation of foreign Indian style to indigenous traditions.
Bodhisattva Torso is a bronze four-armed bodhisattva. He has a slender, bare body, clothed only in a short garment covering the loins
The Bodhisattva Maitreya
The Bodhisattva Maitreya
Bodhisattva Torso is a bronze four-armed bodhisattva. He has a slender, bare body, clothed only in a short garment covering the loins

The Bodhisattva Maitreya

Thailand, Prakhon Chai, Buriram province
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
Late 8th century A.D.
Bronze
48 1/4 x 20 1/16 x 12 3/8 in. (122.5 x 51 x 31.5 cm)
AP 1965.01
The earliest surviving Buddhist images in Southeast Asia, dating from the fourth and fifth centuries A.D., were the bronzes brought from India and Sri Lanka by merchants and monks. The first locally made images date to the sixth century and demonstrate that regional styles were already developing.
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler is a carved limestone relief with traces of paint. It depicts It depicts the presentation of captives in a palace throne room to a king and his military chief.
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler
Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler is a carved limestone relief with traces of paint. It depicts It depicts the presentation of captives in a palace throne room to a king and his military chief.

Presentation of Captives to a Maya Ruler

Mexico, Usumacinta River Valley, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 785
Limestone with traces of paint
45 3/8 x 35 in. (115.3 x 88.9 cm)
AP 1971.07
This carved relief probably served as a wall panel inside a Maya building or as a lintel over an entrance. It depicts the presentation of captives in a palace throne room, indicated by swag curtains at the top of the panel.
Xipe Totec vividly conveys the concept of death and rebirth by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim
Xipe Totec
Xipe Totec
Xipe Totec vividly conveys the concept of death and rebirth by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim

Xipe Totec

Mexico, Nahua culture
Postclassic period (900–1521)
c. 900–1200
Ceramic
15 3/4 x 6 5/8 x 3 7/8 in. (40 x 16.8 x 9.8 cm)
AP 1979.39
Xipe Totec, the Aztec god of spring and regeneration, appears in many Mesoamerican cults. A fertility deity, Xipe Totec vividly conveys the concept of death and rebirth by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim.

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