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Standing Ruler
Standing Ruler

Standing Ruler

Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 600–800
Ceramic with traces of paint
9 3/8 x 3 7/8 x 3 7/8 in. (23.8 x 9.9 x 9.8 cm)
AP 1984.03
The surviving works of Maya civilization range from the smallest objects to great edifices. Among the small-scale artworks of the Maya are many exquisite ceramic figurines only a few inches high.
Flask
Flask

Flask

Japan
Asuka period (552–645)
7th century A.D.
High-fired clay (Sue ware)
12 3/8 x 10 3/8 x 7 1/4 in. (31.4 x 26.3 x 18.4 cm)
AP 1983.01
This flask exemplifies a type of ceramic vessel produced in the sixth and seventh centuries in Japan for ritual use or for placement in tombs as offerings.
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni
Standing Buddha Shakyamuni

Standing Buddha Shakyamuni

Nepal
Licchavi period (400-750)
7th century
Gilded copper
19 3/4 x 8 x 3 3/8 in. (50.2 x 20.3 x 8.6 cm)
AP 1979.01
This slim, richly gilded figure represents the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni, Sage of the Shakya clan.
Court Lady
Court Lady

Court Lady

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
16 5/16 x 7 1/16 x 6 3/8 in. (41.5 x 18 x 16.2 cm)
AP 2001.01
One of the most engaging and distinctive groups of Tang funerary sculpture is the one representing ladies of the court. This animated and charming example stands in a gracefully swayed pose, her petite hands held in a conversational gesture in front of her swelling form.
Earth Spirit
Earth Spirit

Earth Spirit

China, probably Shaanxi province
Tang dynasty (618–907)
First half of the 8th century
Gray earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
31 1/8 x 7 9/16 x 11 1/4 in. (79.1 x 19.2 x 28.5 cm)
AP 2001.02
The inclusion of fantastic animal guardians as part of the retinue of tomb figures began in the Northern Wei dynasty (A.D. 386–534) and continued into the Tang dynasty.
Harihara
Harihara

Harihara

Cambodia, Kompong Cham, style of Prasat Andet
Pre-Angkor period (550–802)
c. 675–700
Stone
45 1/2 x 20 7/8 x 11 in. (115.6 x 53 x 28 cm)
AP 1988.01
The Khmer kingdom controlled Cambodia as well as large areas of Vietnam, Thailand, and Laos from the sixth to the fifteenth centuries.
Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross
Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross

Censer Stand with the Head of a Supernatural Being with a Kan Cross

Mexico, Usumacinta region, Chiapas, Palenque, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600-900)
c. A.D. 690-720
Ceramic with traces of pigments
44 7/8 × 21 1/2 × 11 1/2 in. (114 × 54.6 × 29.2 cm)
AP 2013.02
Monumental ceramic censer stands are some of the finest and largest freestanding sculptures created by Maya artists.
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld
Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld

Censer Stand with the Head of the Jaguar God of the Underworld

Mexico, Usumacinta region, Chiapas, Palenque, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600-900)
c. A.D. 690-720
Ceramic with traces of pigments
44 × 22 × 12 1/4 in. (111.8 × 55.9 × 31.1 cm)
AP 2013.01
Monumental ceramic censer stands are some of the finest and largest freestanding sculptures created by Maya artists.
Vessel with Ceremonial Scene
Vessel with Ceremonial Scene

Vessel with Ceremonial Scene

Mexico, Campeche, Jaina Island (?), Maya culture, Chocholá style
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 690–750
Carved ceramic with traces of pigment
H. 8 1/8 in. (20.7 cm); Diam. 6 13/16 in. (17.3 cm)
APx 1974.04
The scene on this vessel appears to depict a ritual that is being enacted in a sumptuous palace interior, indicated by the swagged curtain framing the top of the scene.
Stela with a Ruler
Stela with a Ruler

Stela with a Ruler

Guatemala, Petén region, El Peru, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
A.D. 692
Limestone
107 3/8 x 68 3/8 in. (272.7 x 173.7 cm)
AP 1970.02
The Maya were prolific makers of carved stone-slab monuments, or stelae, which were normally set up within architectural complexes and most often portray specific, named individuals who were members of the hereditary dynasties that ruled Maya city-states.
Pendant: Twin Warriors
Pendant: Twin Warriors

Pendant: Twin Warriors

Panama, Azuero Peninsula, Conte Style
Late Classic to Postclassic period (600–1521)
c. 700–1200
Gold
3 1/4 x 4 13/16 x 1 in. (8.2 x 12.2 x 2.5 cm) Weight: 0.63 lb. (286.8 g)
AP 1979.23
The art of casting elaborate designs in gold had emerged in Panama by the middle of the first millennium A.D.; regional schools excelled in the techniques of cast and beaten gold.
Pendant: Two Deer Heads
Pendant: Two Deer Heads

Pendant: Two Deer Heads

Panama, Azuero Peninsula, Conte Style
Late Classic to Postclassic period (600–1521)
c. 700–1200
Gold
2 13/16 x 4 11/16 x 1 in. (7.2 x 11.9 x 2.5 cm) Weight: 0.42 lb. (188.4 g)
AP 1979.24
The art of casting elaborate designs in gold had emerged in Panama by the middle of the first millennium a.d.; regional schools excelled in the techniques of cast and beaten gold.
Vessel with a Ball Game Scene
Vessel with a Ball Game Scene

Vessel with a Ball Game Scene

Mexico or Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 700–800
Polychromed ceramic
H. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm); Diam. 4 7/8 in. (12.4 cm)
AP 1989.05
The figures on Vessel with a Ball Game Scene are engaged in a ritual ball game commonly played in Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900) Maya cities. The protective ball game equipment includes a heavy wood-and-leather belt and knee pad.
Vessel with Two Gods before a Mountain
Vessel with Two Gods before a Mountain

Vessel with Two Gods before a Mountain

Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 700–800
Carved ceramic with traces of pigment
H. 6 5/8 in. (16.8 cm); Diam. 6 7/8 in. (17.5 cm)
AP 1980.10
The elaborate mythological scene on this vessel, carved in low relief in the leather-hard clay before firing, achieves at a smaller scale much the same effect as the Maya stone relief carvings.
Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type
Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type

Gigaku Mask of the Karura Type

Japan
Nara period (A.D. 710–794)
8th century
Dry lacquer (dakkatsu kanshitsu)
14 x 10 1/8 x 12 in. (35.6 x 25.7 x 30.5 cm)
AP 2005.02
This very striking and expressive Japanese gigaku mask depicts Karura, one of the fourteen characters in the gigaku, a religious dance-drama that was performed for the Japanese royal court at Buddhist temple ceremonies from the 7th to the 10th century.
Vessel of the Ik’ Dancer
Vessel of the Ik’ Dancer

Vessel of the Ik’ Dancer

Guatemala, Maya culture
Late Classic period (A.D. 600–900)
c. A.D. 750
Polychromed ceramic
H. 8 3/4 in. (22.3 cm); Diam. 4 3/8 in. (11.1 cm)
AP 1985.10
This vessel depicts a Maya lord nicknamed the Fat Cacique, ruler of the Ik’ polity. The action of the scene is divided between the interior and exterior of a palace building raised on a low platform with two steps.

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