On View

Xipe Totec vividly conveys the concept of death and rebirth by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim
Xipe Totec
Xipe Totec
Xipe Totec vividly conveys the concept of death and rebirth by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim

Xipe Totec

Mexico, Nahua culture
Postclassic period (900–1521)
c. 900–1200
Ceramic
15 3/4 x 6 5/8 x 3 7/8 in. (40 x 16.8 x 9.8 cm)
AP 1979.39
Xipe Totec, the Aztec god of spring and regeneration, appears in many Mesoamerican cults. A fertility deity, Xipe Totec vividly conveys the concept of death and rebirth by wearing the flayed skin of a sacrificial victim.
Rain God Vessel is a polychromed ceramic  spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure, which is someone impersonating a deity. e holds a club in his right hand and has a shield attached to his left wrist; his entire head is engulfed in an animal-head helmet.
Rain God Vessel
Rain God Vessel
Rain God Vessel is a polychromed ceramic  spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure, which is someone impersonating a deity. e holds a club in his right hand and has a shield attached to his left wrist; his entire head is engulfed in an animal-head helmet.

Rain God Vessel

Mexico, Colima, El Chanal, Mixtec style
Middle Post Classic period (1200–1400)
c. 1100–1400
Polychromed ceramic
9 3/4 x 8 1/4 x 11 1/4 in. (24.7 x 21 x 28.5 cm)
APx 1974.02
This spouted vessel in the form of a crouching figure represents an important aspect of Mesoamerican religious practice—deity impersonation—by which the gods were brought directly into the world of experience. The disguise portrayed in this piece is a double one, however: warrior and rain god.
Detail of the carefully modeled face
Head, possibly a King
Head, possibly a King
Detail of the carefully modeled face

Head, possibly a King

Africa, Southwestern Nigeria, Ife culture
12th–14th century
Terracotta with residue of red pigment and traces of mica
10 1/2 x 5 11/16 x 7 3/8 in. (26.7 x 14.5 x 18.7 cm)
AP 1994.04
The art of Ife, which flourished from the twelfth to the fifteenth century in southwestern Nigeria, in the area occupied by the Yoruba people, is unique in Africa in representing human beings with extraordinary naturalism.
Seated Nyoirin Kannon is a wood sculpture of a deity seated in a relaxed pose, resting on one of his six hands. His other hands hold a jewel, a lotus, and
Seated Nyoirin Kannon
Seated Nyoirin Kannon
Seated Nyoirin Kannon is a wood sculpture of a deity seated in a relaxed pose, resting on one of his six hands. His other hands hold a jewel, a lotus, and

Seated Nyoirin Kannon

Japan
Kamakura period (1185–1333)
c. 1230–50
Wood with traces of gilt and pigment
19 x 18 x 10 in. (48.3 x 45.7 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1985.15
Kannon is the Japanese name for the Indian Buddhist deity Avalokiteshvara, the bodhisattva of compassion. Because of the boundless love he offered to all beings, this was the most popular of all the Buddhist deities throughout Asia.
The Raising of Lazarus shows the moment when Jesus called Lazarus forth from the tomb in tempera and gold on panel
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus
The Raising of Lazarus shows the moment when Jesus called Lazarus forth from the tomb in tempera and gold on panel

The Raising of Lazarus

Duccio di Buoninsegna
Italian (active 1278–1318)
14th century
1310–11
Tempera and gold on panel
17 1/8 x 18 1/4 in. (43.5 x 46.4 cm) Framed: 20 7/8 x 22 1/8 x 1 7/8 in. (53 x 56.2 x 4.8 cm)
APx 1975.01
Duccio was the preeminent Sienese painter in the early years of the fourteenth century. He infused the prevailing Byzantine style with a more naturalistic, narrative mode.
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes is made of tempera and gold on panel. Notable is the use of pure pigments, such as vermilion and lapis lazuli and gilded decorative borders of the drapery
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes
The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes is made of tempera and gold on panel. Notable is the use of pure pigments, such as vermilion and lapis lazuli and gilded decorative borders of the drapery

The Apostle Saint James the Greater Freeing the Magician Hermogenes

Fra Angelico (Fra Giovanni da Fiesole)
Italian (c. 1395/1400–1455)
15th century
c. 1426–29
Tempera and gold on panel
10 9/16 x 9 3/8 in. (26.8 x 23.8 cm) Framed: 18 5/8 x 17 7/16 in. (47.3 x 44.3 cm)
AP 1986.03
Born Guido di Piero, the artist known as Fra Angelico acquired his nickname not long after his death, when he was referred to as “Angelicus” by a fellow Dominican monk for his pious life and artworks.
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna) is a terracotta relief of the Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)
Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna) is a terracotta relief of the Virgin and Child

Virgin and Child (The Borromeo Madonna)

Attributed to Donatello (Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi)
Italian (1386/87–1466)
15th century
c. 1450
Terracotta
32 7/8 x 20 1/2 in. (83.5 x 52.1 cm)
AP 2006.01
Celebrated for his powers of invention, range of expression, and technical prowess, Donatello was the preeminent Italian sculptor of the fifteenth century.
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist is a devotional painting which places Madonna and Child in the center of the composition
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist is a devotional painting which places Madonna and Child in the center of the composition

The Madonna and Child with Saints Joseph, Elizabeth, and John the Baptist

Andrea Mantegna
Italian (c. 1430/31–1506)
15th century
c. 1485–88
Distemper, oil, and gold on canvas
24 3/4 x 20 3/16 in. (62.9 x 51.3 cm) Framed: 32 3/8 x 28 3/8 x 3 in. (82.2 x 72.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1987.04
Trained in the humanist university town of Padua, Andrea Mantegna developed a lifelong passion for antiquity that profoundly informed his work as an artist.
Her hair, the moon, and other details of the sculpture are gilded.
Virgin and Child
Virgin and Child
Her hair, the moon, and other details of the sculpture are gilded.

Virgin and Child

South Germany
15th century
15th century
1486
Silver, parcel-gilt, stones (opal, clear and pale sapphires, garnets, and pale emeralds)
21 × 6 3/4 × 6 3/4 in. (53.3 × 17.1 × 17.1 cm)
AP 2002.03
The subject of this rare example of Late Gothic church sculpture can be identified as the Virgin of the Apocalypse, whose imagery—the aureole of the sun, along with the twelve stars in her crown, and the crescent moon beneath her—is derived from the book of Revelation (12:1–5): “And there appeared a
The gilt Gothic inscription on this masterpiece of northern Renaissance portraiture identifies the sitter as Jacob Obrecht (1457/58–1505), a renowned choirmaster and one of the greatest composers of his age.
Jacob Obrecht
Jacob Obrecht
The gilt Gothic inscription on this masterpiece of northern Renaissance portraiture identifies the sitter as Jacob Obrecht (1457/58–1505), a renowned choirmaster and one of the greatest composers of his age.

Jacob Obrecht

Netherlandish or French
15th century
15th century
1496
Tempera, oil, and gold on panel
20 1/4 x 14 1/4 in. (51.4 x 36.2 cm)
AP 1993.02
The gilt Gothic inscription on this masterpiece of northern Renaissance portraiture identifies the sitter as Jacob Obrecht (1457/58–1505), a renowned choirmaster and one of the greatest composers of his age.
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the incarnation. The Resurrected Savior faces the worshiper with a level gaze. He raises his right hand in blessing, and with his left grips the bright red staff of the banner of the Resurrection.
Christ Blessing
Christ Blessing
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the incarnation. The Resurrected Savior faces the worshiper with a level gaze. He raises his right hand in blessing, and with his left grips the bright red staff of the banner of the Resurrection.

Christ Blessing

Giovanni Bellini
Italian (c. 1438–1516)
16th century
c. 1500
Tempera, oil, and gold on panel
23 1/4 x 18 1/2 in. (59 x 47 cm) Framed: 31 x 26 x 3 in. (78.7 x 66 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1967.07
Bellini’s Christ Blessing vividly portrays the central mystery of the Christian faith: the incarnation, when Christ––fully human and fully divine––was sent to earth to redeem humankind.
 Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este is a terracotta bust of who we believe to be Marchioness of Mantua. It represents her in a highly flattering way, presenting an ideal, classicized “likeness."
Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este
Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este
 Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este is a terracotta bust of who we believe to be Marchioness of Mantua. It represents her in a highly flattering way, presenting an ideal, classicized “likeness."

Portrait of a Woman, Probably Isabella d’Este

Attributed to Gian Cristoforo Romano
Italian (c. 1465–1512)
16th century
c. 1500
Terracotta, formerly polychromed
21 3/8 x 21 1/2 in. (54.3 x 54.6 cm)
AP 2004.01
This rare terracotta portrait bust probably represents Isabella d’Este, Marchioness of Mantua. The most celebrated woman of her day, Isabella d’Este (1474–1539) cultivated one of the most illustrious courts in Renaissance Italy.
Seated Man, Possibly Huehueteotl is a basalt sculpture of an old macehualli, or man of the people. The bold facial scarification and more subtle, abstract patterns on the kneecaps, shoulder blades, and vertebrae suggest that he also represents the “Old God,” Huehueteotl
Seated Man, Possibly Huehueteotl
Seated Man, Possibly Huehueteotl
Seated Man, Possibly Huehueteotl is a basalt sculpture of an old macehualli, or man of the people. The bold facial scarification and more subtle, abstract patterns on the kneecaps, shoulder blades, and vertebrae suggest that he also represents the “Old God,” Huehueteotl

Seated Man, Possibly Huehueteotl

Mexico, Aztec culture
Postclassic period (900–1521)
c. 1500
Basalt
25 1/4 x 15 1/4 x 12 1/8 in. (64.1 x 38.7 x 30.8 cm)
AP 1969.19
Aztec society was militaristic and regimented, and their art and culture show a pervasive interest in ritual and the symbolism of death.
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.

Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope

Bambaia (Agostino Busti)
Italian (c. 1483–1548)
16th century
c. 1520–25
Marble
a: 23 13/16 x 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (60.5 x 24.2 x 19.3 cm) b: 26 3/16 x 12 3/8 x 6 1/2 in. (66.5 x 31.5 x 16.5 cm)
AP 1981.12 a,b
Agostino Busti, known as Bambaia, was an important Lombard sculptor, notable for his refined technique and innovative classicism.
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.

The Madonna and Child

Parmigianino (Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola)
Italian (1503–1540)
16th century
c. 1527–30
Oil on panel
17 5/8 x 13 3/8 in. (44.8 x 34 cm) Framed: 24 1/16 x 20 x 2 1/2 in. (61.1 x 50.8 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1995.09
Hailed as the new Raphael, Parmigianino was one of the most influential artists of the sixteenth century, cultivating a mannered gracefulness of pose and physiognomy, combined with new and dramatic coloristic effects, that transformed the classicism of his Renaissance predecessors.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.

The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Italian (c. 1488–1576)
16th century
1530s
Oil on panel
41 1/2 x 58 3/8 in. (105.4 x 148.3 cm) Framed: 54 1/2 x 71 1/8 x 3 3/4 in. (138.4 x 180.7 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1986.07
More than any other Renaissance master, Titian was acclaimed—in his own lifetime and for centuries thereafter—for his expressive handling of paint and rich use of color. Like his teachers Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione, Titian set many of his religious subjects in a pastoral landscape.

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