On View

The Stonecutters depicts a scene that could have been easily witnessed along the outskirts of Paris––a stonecutter is shown swinging his mallet, alongside a horse-drawn cart already full of hewn rock.
The Stonecutters
The Stonecutters
The Stonecutters depicts a scene that could have been easily witnessed along the outskirts of Paris––a stonecutter is shown swinging his mallet, alongside a horse-drawn cart already full of hewn rock.

The Stonecutters

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
French (1796–1875)
19th century
c. 1872–74
Oil on canvas
32 1/2 x 40 in. (82.6 x 101.6 cm) Framed: 43 x 50 x 4 1/2 in. (109.2 x 127 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1994.08
The Stonecutters featured in the posthumous retrospective of Corot’s work held in 1875 in Paris––the first public homage to the fame of the deceased master––where it was purchased by a Parisian, Dr. Cambay.
Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother is the artist's terracotta-cast posthumous portrait of his musician brother. The artist’s physical involvement is evident in the artist’s physical involvement through sketchy handling, traces of the artist's fingers, lines and chisel marks on the jacket and hair.
Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother
Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother
Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother is the artist's terracotta-cast posthumous portrait of his musician brother. The artist’s physical involvement is evident in the artist’s physical involvement through sketchy handling, traces of the artist's fingers, lines and chisel marks on the jacket and hair.

Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother

Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux
French (1827–1875)
19th century
1874
Terracotta
27 x 19 1/2 x 15 in. (68.6 x 49.5 x 38.1 cm)
AP 1984.21
Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux was much sought after as a portraitist by prominent sitters, including members of the French imperial household. Among his finest busts is this posthumous portrait of his older brother, Charles, a musician, who died in 1870 after long suffering.
Kneeling Mother and Child is a sensual and naturalistic wooden sculpture thought to represent the primeval matriarch who founded the Makonde tribe.
Kneeling Mother and Child
Kneeling Mother and Child
Kneeling Mother and Child is a sensual and naturalistic wooden sculpture thought to represent the primeval matriarch who founded the Makonde tribe.

Kneeling Mother and Child

Africa, Tanzania-Mozambique border area, Makonde people
late 19th century
Wood
14 1/2 x 5 3/8 x 4 3/4 in. (36.8 x 13.6 x 12 cm)
AP 1979.37
Among the few East African peoples who make sculptures in any quantity, the Makonde produce unusually naturalistic figures.
On the Pont de l’Europe is Caillebotte's virtually monochromatic painting of three figures standing in the cold on the modern industrial bridge, which overlooks the Saint-Lazare train station.
On the Pont de l’Europe
On the Pont de l’Europe
On the Pont de l’Europe is Caillebotte's virtually monochromatic painting of three figures standing in the cold on the modern industrial bridge, which overlooks the Saint-Lazare train station.

On the Pont de l’Europe

Gustave Caillebotte
French (1848–1894)
19th century
1876–77
Oil on canvas
41 5/8 x 51 1/2 in. (105.7 x 130.8 cm) Framed: 55 11/16 x 65 3/4 x 4 15/16 in. (141.5 x 167 x 12.5 cm)
AP 1982.01
Although his closest artist friends were Monet and Renoir, the key advocates for loose brushwork and bright color, Caillebotte preferred the sort of conventional draftsmanship and unaffected urban subjects dear to their fellow Impressionist Degas.
Portrait of Georges Clemenceau is one of two of Manet's unfinished portraits of the French political figure. The rostrum at the bottom of this painting  indicate Clemenceau’s incumbency at the time in the Chamber of Deputies.
Portrait of Georges Clemenceau
Portrait of Georges Clemenceau
Portrait of Georges Clemenceau is one of two of Manet's unfinished portraits of the French political figure. The rostrum at the bottom of this painting  indicate Clemenceau’s incumbency at the time in the Chamber of Deputies.

Portrait of Georges Clemenceau

Édouard Manet
French (1832–1883)
19th century
1879–80
Oil on canvas
45 5/8 x 34 3/4 in. (115.9 x 88.2 cm) Framed: 59 1/4 x 48 1/4 x 3 in. (150.5 x 122.6 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1981.01
Shortly after he became prime minister of France in 1906, Georges Clemenceau (1841–1929) ordered Manet’s controversial painting of Olympia to be transferred from the Musée du Luxembourg (where contemporary art was relegated) to the Louvre, thus granting it old master status.
Self-Portrait is both somber and defiant in mood and is the first of the many self-portraits in which Gauguin sought to explore his dark inner psyche.
Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait is both somber and defiant in mood and is the first of the many self-portraits in which Gauguin sought to explore his dark inner psyche.

Self-Portrait

Paul Gauguin
French (1848–1903)
19th century
1885
Oil on canvas
25 11/16 x 21 3/8 in. (65.2 x 54.3 cm) Framed: 37 1/2 x 33 1/4 x 2 3/4 in. (95.3 x 84.5 x 7 cm)
AP 1997.03
Gauguin assumed his role as renegade artist in 1885. Rather than remain jobless in Copenhagen with his Danish wife and their five children, the former stockbroker decided now to return to Paris to follow his restless artistic conscience.
Skeletons Warming Themselves depicts three dressed-up skeletons in the foreground around a stove on which is written “Pas de feu” and under it “en trouverez vous demain?”—“No fire. Will you find any tomorrow?” Ensor placed objects in the foreground to symbolize art, music, and literature in order to say art and patronage expires.
Skeletons Warming Themselves
Skeletons Warming Themselves
Skeletons Warming Themselves depicts three dressed-up skeletons in the foreground around a stove on which is written “Pas de feu” and under it “en trouverez vous demain?”—“No fire. Will you find any tomorrow?” Ensor placed objects in the foreground to symbolize art, music, and literature in order to say art and patronage expires.

Skeletons Warming Themselves

James Ensor
Belgian (1860–1949)
19th century
1889
Oil on canvas
29 7/16 x 23 5/8 in. (74.8 x 60 cm) Framed: 39 1/2 x 33 1/2 x 3 in. (100.3 x 85.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1981.20
James Ensor was one of the most original painters of the late nineteenth century. Populated with masks and skeletons, his macabre images are morbid commentaries on the human condition, his hometown of Ostend on the North Sea, Belgian history, and his own mortality.
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir shows one of Cézanne's favorite motifs of Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture.
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir shows one of Cézanne's favorite motifs of Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture.

Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir

Paul Cézanne
French (1839–1906)
20th century
c. 1895
Oil on canvas
25 9/16 x 31 7/8 in. (65 x 81 cm) Framed: 37 x 43 1/2 x 4 3/4 in. (94 x 110.5 x 12.1 cm)
AP 1982.05
Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture—formed one of Cézanne’s favorite subjects.
Girls on the Pier
Girls on the Pier

Girls on the Pier

Edvard Munch
Norwegian (1863–1944)
20th century
c. 1904 or 1933-35
Oil on canvas
31 11/16 x 27 5/16 in. (80.5 x 69.3 cm) Framed: 40 1/2 x 36 3/4 x 3 in. (102.9 x 93.4 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1966.06
In 1889 Munch started spending periods of time at the resort of Åsgårdstrand, which was popular with artists and writers. While summering there in 1893, he developed the pictorial ideas that some years later would evolve into Girls on the Pier.
Nude Combing Her Hair is one of Picasos's paintings of a female nude after his blue perior. The nude woman's pose is based on the classical Venus Anadyomene type of figure, but with a sketchy mask-like face and modern disjunctions.
Nude Combing Her Hair
Nude Combing Her Hair
Nude Combing Her Hair is one of Picasos's paintings of a female nude after his blue perior. The nude woman's pose is based on the classical Venus Anadyomene type of figure, but with a sketchy mask-like face and modern disjunctions.

Nude Combing Her Hair

Pablo Picasso
Spanish (1881–1973)
20th century
1906
Oil on canvas
41 1/2 x 32 in. (105.4 x 81.3 cm) Framed: 51 1/4 x 41 x 3 1/4 in. (130.2 x 104.1 x 8.3 cm)
AP 1982.06
Based on the classical Venus Anadyomene type of figure—in which the goddess, rising from the sea, wrings out her hair—Nude Combing Her Hair attests to the engagement with classicism that preoccupied Picasso throughout his career.
Head is one of about twenty-seven surviving sculptures by Modigliani. Head is distinguished from others by its complex balance of brutality and refinement, as the delicate head emerges from the roughly hewn mass of the stone block.
Head
Head
Head is one of about twenty-seven surviving sculptures by Modigliani. Head is distinguished from others by its complex balance of brutality and refinement, as the delicate head emerges from the roughly hewn mass of the stone block.

Head

Amedeo Modigliani
Italian (1884–1920)
20th Century
c. 1913
Limestone
20 5/8 × 9 3/4 × 14 3/4 in., 112.5 lb. (52.4 × 24.8 × 37.5 cm, 51 kg)
AG 2017.01
The Kimbell Art Museum is honored to receive the gift of a masterpiece of modern sculpture, a carved limestone Head by the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani. This rare work is one of about twenty-seven surviving sculptures by the artist.
In Bourdelle's Penelope, the figure’s identity as Penelope, the wife of Odysseus in Homer's The Odyssey, is manifest only from the ancient Greek costume and meditative pose.
Penelope
Penelope
In Bourdelle's Penelope, the figure’s identity as Penelope, the wife of Odysseus in Homer's The Odyssey, is manifest only from the ancient Greek costume and meditative pose.

Penelope

Antoine Bourdelle
French (1861–1929)
20th century
1909
Cast bronze, dark green patina
47 1/8 x 17 1/4 x 14 3/4 in. (119.7 x 43.8 x 37.5 cm)
AP 1969.03
Bourdelle is generally acclaimed as the most important heir to Rodin, in whose studio he was an assistant from 1893 until 1908.
In Braque's Girl with a Cross, the head (or rather its disembodied details) emerges like an apparition amid a rich interplay of highlighted and shaded facets, thinly scumbled and atmospheric in mood.
Girl with a Cross
Girl with a Cross
In Braque's Girl with a Cross, the head (or rather its disembodied details) emerges like an apparition amid a rich interplay of highlighted and shaded facets, thinly scumbled and atmospheric in mood.

Girl with a Cross

Georges Braque
French (1882–1963)
20th century
1911
Oil on canvas
21 5/8 x 16 15/16 in. (55 x 43 cm)
AP 1989.02
Beginning in late 1907, Braque and his new acquaintance Pablo Picasso began to paint objects as highly simplified geometric forms, expressing solidarity with the most idiosyncratic tendencies in the art of Cézanne—especially that of putting together unaligned observations of adjacent parts.
Man with a Pipe
Man with a Pipe

Man with a Pipe

Pablo Picasso
Spanish (1881–1973)
20th century
1911
Oil on canvas
35 11/16 x 27 15/16 in. (90.7 x 71 cm) Framed: 44 1/2 x 37 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (113 x 95.3 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1966.08
In early July 1911, Picasso left Paris for Céret, a small town in southwestern France, near the Spanish border. Braque joined him there in August and the two painted their ultimate “Analytical Cubist” works in intense dialogue.
Composition is Mondrian's cubist-inspired works scumbled atmospheric tones of ocher, blue gray, and pink.
Composition
Composition
Composition is Mondrian's cubist-inspired works scumbled atmospheric tones of ocher, blue gray, and pink.

Composition

Piet Mondrian
Dutch (1872–1944)
20th century
1914
Oil on canvas
47 1/2 x 39 7/8 in. (120.6 x 101.3 cm) Framed: 48 1/8 x 40 5/16 x 13/16 in. (122.2 x 102.4 x 2.1 cm)
APg 1983.03
From the age of fourteen, when Mondrian decided to become a painter, he specialized in calm landscapes, often with isolated buildings and shadowy twilight effects of dull gold and silver.
Portrait of Heriberto Casany is Miró's portrait of his art-school friend Heriberto Casany while in the art group called the Courbets. With his spindly fingers and the undulating folds in his tweed suit jacket, Casany resembles saints depicted in medieval Catalan frescoes with gold backgrounds.
Portrait of Heriberto Casany
Portrait of Heriberto Casany
Portrait of Heriberto Casany is Miró's portrait of his art-school friend Heriberto Casany while in the art group called the Courbets. With his spindly fingers and the undulating folds in his tweed suit jacket, Casany resembles saints depicted in medieval Catalan frescoes with gold backgrounds.

Portrait of Heriberto Casany

Joan Miró
Spanish (1893–1983)
20th century
1918
Oil on canvas
27 5/8 x 24 7/16 in. (70.2 x 62 cm) Framed: 38 1/2 x 36 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (97.8 x 92.7 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1984.09
“Here in Barcelona, we lack courage,” Miró wrote in late 1917 to his studio-mate Enric Ricart. “We, the younger generation, could get together and exhibit every year, all together under the name of the “Chrome Yellow Salon,” for example, and pronounce virile manifestos. . . .

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