On View

Horse and Rider shows a boldly sculpted and precisely rendered horse, suggesting the physical attributes of the Samanthian breed. The rider’s face is characteristic of the period, with simple and abbreviated, yet naturally modeled. Both enhanced by the addition of colorful pigments, which delineate the rider’s costume and the horse’s saddle and harness
Horse and Rider
Horse and Rider
Horse and Rider shows a boldly sculpted and precisely rendered horse, suggesting the physical attributes of the Samanthian breed. The rider’s face is characteristic of the period, with simple and abbreviated, yet naturally modeled. Both enhanced by the addition of colorful pigments, which delineate the rider’s costume and the horse’s saddle and harness

Horse and Rider

China, probably Shaanxi province
Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9)
2nd–1st century B.C.
Earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
22 5/8 x 21 1/2 x 6 5/8 in. (57.5 x 54.6 x 16.8 cm)
AP 1994.07
Tombs of the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D.. 220) were typically furnished with model figures and other objects believed to be necessary for a safe journey to the afterlife.
Detail of Male Figure's head and shoulders with complex hairstyle,  composed of three rows of seven conical buns, with larger hemispherical caps over the ears, and lavish adornments of necklaces, jewelry, and beaded chains
Male Figure
Male Figure
Detail of Male Figure's head and shoulders with complex hairstyle,  composed of three rows of seven conical buns, with larger hemispherical caps over the ears, and lavish adornments of necklaces, jewelry, and beaded chains

Male Figure

Africa, Northern Nigeria, Nok culture
c. 500 B.C.–A.D. 500
c. 195 B.C.–A.D. 205
Terracotta
19 1/2 x 8 3/4 x 6 5/8 in. (49.5 x 22.2 x 16.8 cm)
AP 1996.03
Nok terracottas are the earliest known sculptures from ancient Nigeria. Sculptures of this kind were first discovered in 1943 by Bernard Fagg near the northern Nigerian village of Nok, after which the culture that produced them was named.
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos), in which the lips were originally overlaid with copper, and the eyes inlaid with stone, glass, and metal
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos), in which the lips were originally overlaid with copper, and the eyes inlaid with stone, glass, and metal

Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)

Hellenistic or Roman
probably after Lysippos (Greek, c. 365–c. 310 B.C.)
c. 2nd–1st century B.C.
Cast bronze
11 1/2 × 8 1/4 × 10 3/4 in. (29.2 × 21 × 27.3 cm) With base: 20 1/4 × 8 1/4 × 10 3/4 in. (51.44 × 20.96 × 27.31 cm) Weight: 36.6 lb. (16.6 kg)
AP 2000.03 a,b
This exceptionally fine and rare head comes from the statue of an athlete shown scraping oil from his naked body with a strigil after exercising. The lips were originally overlaid with copper, and the eyes inlaid with stone, glass, and metal.
Crouching Aphrodite shown crouching to bathe. She would have had her head turned sharply to the right, her left arm brought across the body to touch the right thigh, and her right arm held up to near the left breast and shoulder.
Crouching Aphrodite
Crouching Aphrodite
Crouching Aphrodite shown crouching to bathe. She would have had her head turned sharply to the right, her left arm brought across the body to touch the right thigh, and her right arm held up to near the left breast and shoulder.

Crouching Aphrodite

Roman, based on a Greek original of c. 3rd–2nd century B.C.
Late Republican–Early Imperial (1st cent. B.C.–2nd cent. A.D.)
c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 140
Marble
25 x 13 7/8 x 19 3/8 in. (63.5 x 35.3 x 49.2 cm)
AP 1967.09
According to the primal Greek myth recounted in Hesiod’s Theogony (genealogy of the gods), Aphrodite, the goddess of love, was born of the aphros, the foam created when Kronos threw the genitals of his father, Uranos (Heaven), into the sea.
Head of Meleager, shown in keeping with  Skopas’s innovations of  the slightly parted lips, the low forehead that protrudes over the bridge of the nose and eyes, and the heavy roll of flesh swelling over the outer corners of the eyes. These features contribute to an expression of of barely suppressed agitation
Head of Meleager
Head of Meleager
Head of Meleager, shown in keeping with  Skopas’s innovations of  the slightly parted lips, the low forehead that protrudes over the bridge of the nose and eyes, and the heavy roll of flesh swelling over the outer corners of the eyes. These features contribute to an expression of of barely suppressed agitation

Head of Meleager

After Skopas
Greek (c. 370–330 B.C.)
Late Republican–Early Imperial (1st cent. B.C.–2nd cent. A.D.)
50 B.C.–A.D. 100
Marble
11 3/4 x 8 x 9 1/2 in. (29.8 x 20.3 x 24.1 cm)
AP 1967.10
This head is from a Roman copy of a full-length statue by the famed fourth-century-B.C. Greek sculptor Skopas. It showed the mythological hero Meleager with a hunting dog and the head of the Kalydonian boar.
Upper torso and head of Standing Bodhisattva
Standing Bodhisattva
Standing Bodhisattva
Upper torso and head of Standing Bodhisattva

Standing Bodhisattva

Pakistan, ancient region of Gandhara
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
2nd–3rd century A.D.
Gray schist
59 1/8 x 30 x 10 in. (150.2 x 76.2 x 25.4 cm)
AP 1997.04
With its masterly craftsmanship, harmonious proportions, and exceptional size, this majestic image of a standing bodhisattva is distinguished by the rich dress and jewelry of a Kushana prince or nobleman from the ancient region of Gandhara, in northeastern Pakistan, in the first or second century A.
Standing Dog showing an animated chow dog covered in a dark green glaze. The dog's head is slightly raised and shows an alert expression
Standing Dog
Standing Dog
Standing Dog showing an animated chow dog covered in a dark green glaze. The dog's head is slightly raised and shows an alert expression

Standing Dog

China
Eastern Han dynasty (A.D. 25–220)
c. 1st century A.D.
Earthenware with lead-fluxed glaze
12 1/4 x 13 1/2 x 5 1/2 in. (31.1 x 34.3 x 14 cm)
AP 1995.01
During the Eastern Han dynasty, sculptors produced images of various dog types—among them mastiffs and chows—that were then included with the human and other animal figures placed in tombs. Dogs were generally fashioned standing on all fours or in recumbent attitudes.
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants sculpted in red sandstone. The Buddha is portrayed as a traditional yogi, seated on a throne, and dressed as a monk with his left shoulder covered and right hand raised
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants
Seated Buddha with Two Attendants sculpted in red sandstone. The Buddha is portrayed as a traditional yogi, seated on a throne, and dressed as a monk with his left shoulder covered and right hand raised

Seated Buddha with Two Attendants

India, Uttar Pradesh, Mathura
Kushan period (c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 320)
A.D. 82
Red sandstone
36 5/8 x 33 5/8 x 6 5/16 in. (93 x 85.4 x 16 cm)
AP 1986.06
The Kushans ruled much of northwestern India and the ancient region of Gandhara (parts of present-day Pakistan and Afghanistan).
Mummy Mask is an Egyptian funerary mask with realistic facial proportions and modeling derived from Roman tradition. The face was pressed from a mold, while the curling hair, ears, and beard were added to increase its portrait-like quality
Mummy Mask
Mummy Mask
Mummy Mask is an Egyptian funerary mask with realistic facial proportions and modeling derived from Roman tradition. The face was pressed from a mold, while the curling hair, ears, and beard were added to increase its portrait-like quality

Mummy Mask

Egypt
Roman period
c. A.D. 120-170
Stucco/gesso with paint, gold leaf, and glass inlays
11 9/16 x 7 5/8 x 5 1/2 in. (29.4 x 19.4 x 14 cm)
AP 1970.05
By the first century B.C., Rome had come to dominate the Mediterranean world. The influence of Roman funerary art and practices is very much apparent in this Egyptian mask.
Priestess of the Imperial Cult is a sculpture of a head of a young woman.
Priestess of the Imperial Cult
Priestess of the Imperial Cult
Priestess of the Imperial Cult is a sculpture of a head of a young woman.

Priestess of the Imperial Cult

Roman
2nd century A.D.
A.D. 170–180
Marble
13 1/4 x 10 5/8 x 9 5/8 in. (33.6 x 27 x 24.5 cm)
AP 1969.18
This head of a young woman was originally part of a full-length, draped statue. It was formerly identified as a portrait of Faustina the Younger, wife of the emperor Marcus Aurelius and daughter of Antoninus Pius.
Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius is a sculpted head showing the last of the emperor's portrait types. This portrait type is characterized by upswept curls above the forehead, a thick mustache covering the upper lip and partially overlapping the lower, and a full beard that falls in two main groups of curls.
Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius
Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius
Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius is a sculpted head showing the last of the emperor's portrait types. This portrait type is characterized by upswept curls above the forehead, a thick mustache covering the upper lip and partially overlapping the lower, and a full beard that falls in two main groups of curls.

Portrait of Emperor Marcus Aurelius

Roman
3rd century
c. A.D. 210–225
Marble (probably from Carrara, Italy)
14 3/8 x 9 7/8 x 10 1/4 in. (36.5 x 25.1 x 26 cm)
AP 1967.11
The Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (reigned A.D. 161–80), the archetypal “philosopher-king,” is perhaps best known today as the author of the Stoic philosophical treatise The Meditations.
Conch Shell Trumpet with elaborate decoration bears the face of a Maya king and a column of glyphs recording the name of its royal owner. The ruler Wears a jaguar headdress
Conch Shell Trumpet
Conch Shell Trumpet
Conch Shell Trumpet with elaborate decoration bears the face of a Maya king and a column of glyphs recording the name of its royal owner. The ruler Wears a jaguar headdress

Conch Shell Trumpet

Guatemala, Maya culture
Early Classic period (A.D. 250–600)
c. A.D. 250–400
Shell with traces of cinnabar
H. 11 9/16 in. (29.3 cm); Diam. 5 1/4 in. (13.4 cm)
AP 1984.11
This elaborately decorated conch shell bears the face of a Maya king, carefully incised following the undulations in the shell’s surface, and a column of glyphs to the side recording the name of its royal owner.
Bearded Man is a mosaic of a bearded man with a frontal pose and serene expression perhaps indicate that he is meant to represent a biblical figure
Bearded Man
Bearded Man
Bearded Man is a mosaic of a bearded man with a frontal pose and serene expression perhaps indicate that he is meant to represent a biblical figure

Bearded Man

Syria
5th century
c. A.D. 400
Mosaic
22 1/4 x 21 1/8 in. (56.5 x 53.7 cm)
AP 1972.19
The identity of this image of a bearded man is unknown. His iconic, frontal pose and serene expression perhaps indicate that he is meant to represent a biblical figure, though not all church decoration at this time was overtly Christian in iconography.
Chalice (?) with Two Strands of Ivy (?) is a mosaic with a schematized image of a vessel with a hemispherical bottom from which rises a hollow stem with two strands of ivy streaming from the top
Chalice (?) with Two Strands of Ivy (?)
Chalice (?) with Two Strands of Ivy (?)
Chalice (?) with Two Strands of Ivy (?) is a mosaic with a schematized image of a vessel with a hemispherical bottom from which rises a hollow stem with two strands of ivy streaming from the top

Chalice (?) with Two Strands of Ivy (?)

Syria
5th century
c. A.D. 400
Mosaic
18 1/16 x 19 in. (45.8 x 48.2 cm)
AP 1972.22
This chalice is a flattened, schematized image of a vessel with a hemispherical bottom from which rises a hollow stem with two strands of ivy streaming from the top.
Parrot is a mosaic of a a parrot with a red beak and legs. The body is outlined by black tesserae.
Parrot
Parrot
Parrot is a mosaic of a a parrot with a red beak and legs. The body is outlined by black tesserae.

Parrot

Syria
5th century
c. A.D. 400
Mosaic
13 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (35 x 50.2 cm)
AP 1972.21
This schematized image of a bird depicts a parrot with a red beak and legs. Black tesserae outline a body predominantly composed of green tesserae with red and yellow around the black pupil of the eye, two yellow tones on the wing, and two gray tones on the underbody.
Peacock is a mosaic of a peacock black eye, legs, beak and colorful feathers.
Peacock
Peacock
Peacock is a mosaic of a peacock black eye, legs, beak and colorful feathers.

Peacock

Syria
5th century
c. A.D. 400
Mosaic
16 3/4 x 20 1/4 in. (42.5 x 51.4 cm)
AP 1972.23
In early Christian art, the peacock symbolized immortality. This peacock might have carried this meaning, or it may have referred to worldly pride and vanity. This schematized image, with black eye, legs, and beak, faces toward the viewer’s right. The head, body, and wings are outlined in black.

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