Japanese Collection

Bowl with Bamboo Leaf Design
Bowl with Bamboo Leaf Design

Bowl with Bamboo Leaf Design

Ogata Kenzan
Japanese (1663–1743)
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 18th century
Stoneware with underglaze iron oxide and transparent glaze
2 7/16 x 4 3/4 in. (6.2 x 12 cm)
AP 1969.09
Ogata Kenzan, one of the great masters of painted ceramics in the Edo period (1615–1868), produced a distinctive style of freely brushed grasses, blossoms, and birds as decorative motifs for pottery. His pieces were noted for their perfect relation between design and shape.
Bowl with Pampas Grass Design
Bowl with Pampas Grass Design

Bowl with Pampas Grass Design

Ogata Kenzan
Japanese (1663–1743)
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 18th century
Stoneware with iron oxide, colored enamels, and transparent glaze
3 3/8 x 4 in. (8.5 x 10.2 cm)
AP 1971.10
Ogata Kenzan, one of the great masters of painted ceramics in the Edo period (1615–1868), produced a distinctive style of freely brushed grasses, blossoms, and birds as decorative motifs for pottery. Kenzan’s famous workshop in Kyoto introduced innovative uses of pigments and glazes to pottery.
Footed Dish
Footed Dish

Footed Dish

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 18th century
Porcelain with underglaze blue and overglaze colored enamels (Nabeshima ware)
2 5/16 x 8 11/16 in. (5.8 x 22.1 cm)
AP 1968.12
Nabeshima was among the several porcelain wares made in the Arita region during the Edo period. The Nabeshima style conformed to the demanding taste of the Japanese noble families who were its principal patrons. This porcelain was not exported.
Shoki Ensnaring a Demon in a Spider Web
Shoki Ensnaring a Demon in a Spider Web

Shoki Ensnaring a Demon in a Spider Web

Soga Shohaku
Japanese (1730–1781)
Edo period (1615–1868)
18th century
Two-fold screen; ink on paper
62 1/2 x 68 1/16 in. (158.7 x 172.8 cm)
AP 1987.07
Soga Shohaku was one of the Three Eccentrics of the Edo period (1615–1868). Accounts of Shohaku’s life are full of anecdotes about his bizarre behavior, and stories about him took on a legendary character.
Spring and Autumn Flowers, Fruits, and Grasses
Spring and Autumn Flowers, Fruits, and Grasses

Spring and Autumn Flowers, Fruits, and Grasses

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
18th century
Pair of six-fold screens; mineral pigments on gold leaf
a: 61 3/8 x 142 5/8 in. (155.9 x 362.3 cm) b: 61 3/8 x 142 7/8 in. (155.9 x 362.9 cm)
AP 1983.02 a,b
The Rinpa school represents the fullest expression of the highly decorative approach to nature painting in Japan. This pair of six-fold screens depicts seasonal plants and flowers rendered in typically bright colors on a brilliant gold background.
Seiobo
Seiobo

Seiobo

Ogata Korin
Japanese (1658–1716)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1705
Hanging scroll; ink and color on silk over paper
37 1/2 x 14 5/8 in. (95.2 x 37.1 cm)
AP 1967.08
Seiobo is the Japanese name for the Chinese Taoist immortal, Xiwangmu, the Queen Mother of the West.
Beauty in a Black Kimono
Beauty in a Black Kimono

Beauty in a Black Kimono

Torii Kiyonobu
Japanese (1664–1729)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1710–20
Hanging scroll; ink, colors, and gold on paper
23 7/8 x 10 7/8 in. (60.7 x 27.7 cm)
AP 1988.02
This painting of a young woman dressed in an eye-catching, boldly patterned black kimono is a rare work by the early ukiyo-e artist Torii Kiyonobu, the son of a kabuki actor and theatrical design painter.
Courtesan in a Procession
Courtesan in a Procession

Courtesan in a Procession

Baioken Eishun
Japanese (fl. 1704–1763)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1720–30
Hanging scroll; ink, color, and gofun on paper
35 3/16 x 17 5/16 in. (89.3 x 44 cm)
AP 1970.10
Ukiyo-e paintings are perceptive reflections of life in the entertainment quarters of Japanese cities during the Edo period.
Box with Courtiers, Carts, and Blossoms
Box with Courtiers, Carts, and Blossoms

Box with Courtiers, Carts, and Blossoms

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
mid-18th century
Black lacquer with gold and lead designs, mother-of-pearl, and shell inlays
5 1/8 x 8 1/16 x 4 3/4 in. (13 x 20.5 x 12 cm)
AP 1976.01
The decorative potential of lacquer has been exploited in Japan since the sixth century, in a variety of styles and techniques. Long admired for their durability and excellent finish, beautifully decorated lacquer objects were used as votive offerings in temples and as luxury items by the nobility.
A Young Dandy
A Young Dandy

A Young Dandy

Miyagawa Choshun
Japanese (1682–1752)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1740
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
37 3/4 x 14 1/8 in. (95.9 x 35.9 cm)
AP 1984.06
The Edo period (1615–1868) school of ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) focused on genre scenes and stylized portraits of the famous courtesans, samurai, and kabuki actors who inhabited the pleasure districts of the great urban centers of Edo (Tokyo), Kyoto, and Osaka.
Crows
Crows

Crows

Maruyama Okyo
Japanese (1733–1795)
Edo period (1615–1868)
1766
Pair of six-fold screens; ink and gold on paper
59 15/16 x 143 11/16 in. (152.2 x 365 cm)
AP 1969.11 a,b
In these screens, a clump of young bamboo and a gnarled plum tree beside a stream provide the setting for a group of crows in flight and at rest. Soft washes of gray ink and gold convey the feeling of dense fog and evoke a sense of deep space.
Two Gibbons Reaching for the Moon
Two Gibbons Reaching for the Moon

Two Gibbons Reaching for the Moon

Ito Jakuchu
Japanese (1713–1800)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1770
Hanging scroll; ink on paper
45 1/4 x 19 1/16 in. (114.9 x 48.4 cm)
AP 2005.01
This charming painting depicts a mother gibbon dangling her baby by the arm as she hangs from a tendril suspended from a tree. The title of the painting is a reference to the Zen Buddhist concept that simple people and animals often mistake the reflection of the moon for the moon itself.
Landscape with a Solitary Traveler
Landscape with a Solitary Traveler

Landscape with a Solitary Traveler

Yosa Buson
Japanese (1716–1784)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1780
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on silk
39 15/16 x 14 5/16 in. (101.5 x 36.4 cm)
AP 1981.18
The nanga (southern painting) school, also called bunjinga (literati painting), was one of the two most dynamic schools of Japanese painting during the eighteenth and first half of the nineteenth century.
Courtesan Playing the Samisen
Courtesan Playing the Samisen

Courtesan Playing the Samisen

Isoda Koryusai
Japanese (active c. 1764–1788)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1785
Hanging scroll; ink and gold on silk
15 1/2 x 19 1/2 in. (39.4 x 49.5 cm)
AP 1984.23
This painting is a late masterwork by Isoda Koryusai, who was an important and prolific ukiyo-e painter and printmaker in the last quarter of the eighteenth century, a time when Koryusai and other artists showed a keen fascination with the natural world.
Fukurojin, the God of Longevity and Wisdom
Fukurojin, the God of Longevity and Wisdom

Fukurojin, the God of Longevity and Wisdom

Ito Jakuchu
Japanese (1713–1800)
Edo period (1617–1868)
c. 1790
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
45 5/8 x 22 1/4 in. (115.9 x 56.5 cm)
APx 1986.02
This humorous image depicts Fukurojin, one of a group of Chinese divinities called the “Seven Household Gods,” who were also popular folk deities in Japan.
Beauty in a White Kimono
Beauty in a White Kimono

Beauty in a White Kimono

Rekisentei Eiri
Japanese (active c. 1790–1800)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1800
Hanging scroll; ink and mineral pigments on paper
48 13/16 x 10 3/8 in. (124 x 26.3 cm)
AP 1981.10
This decorative hanging scroll shows a courtesan, who pauses to glance seductively over her left shoulder, proudly displaying her magnificent white kimono and outer cloak, which are designed in a variety of delicate geometric patterns.

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