French Collection

Composition is Leger's painting of what appears to be rods, wires, and the stenciled letters P, U, and V (presumably taken from some poster or sign observed on the street). It is impossible to identify specific objects, but this colorful painting is one version of many of Leger's painting with these abstract objects arranged in similar interrelationships.
Composition
Composition
Composition is Leger's painting of what appears to be rods, wires, and the stenciled letters P, U, and V (presumably taken from some poster or sign observed on the street). It is impossible to identify specific objects, but this colorful painting is one version of many of Leger's painting with these abstract objects arranged in similar interrelationships.

Composition

Fernand Léger
French (1881–1955)
20th century
c. 1920
Oil on canvas
23 3/4 x 28 7/8 in. (60.3 x 73.4 cm) Framed: 36 x 41 3/4 x 5 in. (91.4 x 106 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1985.11
Léger commonly painted several different variations on each of his pictorial ideas, and many of the same elements in this painting appear in four others, arranged in similar interrelationships.
L'Air is one of eight bronze and lead sculptures corresponding to the stone figure for a monument commissioned from Maillol by the city of Toulouse, France. Maillol based his idea upon a small terracotta he had made around 1900 showing a woman reclining on billowing drapery, as if to represent a Greek goddess at court in the clouds or on the sea.
L'Air
L'Air
L'Air is one of eight bronze and lead sculptures corresponding to the stone figure for a monument commissioned from Maillol by the city of Toulouse, France. Maillol based his idea upon a small terracotta he had made around 1900 showing a woman reclining on billowing drapery, as if to represent a Greek goddess at court in the clouds or on the sea.

L'Air

Aristide Maillol
French (1861–1944)
20th century
Designed in 1938, cast in 1962
Bronze, cast 5, edition of 6
50 13/16 x 92 11/16 x 38 in. (129 x 235.5 x 96.5 cm)
AP 1967.06
This is one of eight bronze and lead sculptures corresponding to the stone figure for a monument commissioned from Maillol by the city of Toulouse, France.
L'Asie culminates Matisse's obsession with painting the female figure in rich, exotic costumes and settings. The title alludes to a well-established tradition in European art in which female figures were used to symbolize each of the continents. Or it may have been suggested by her colorful fur-lined coat over a couture striped gown.
L'Asie (Asia)
L'Asie (Asia)
L'Asie culminates Matisse's obsession with painting the female figure in rich, exotic costumes and settings. The title alludes to a well-established tradition in European art in which female figures were used to symbolize each of the continents. Or it may have been suggested by her colorful fur-lined coat over a couture striped gown.

L'Asie (Asia)

Henri Matisse
French (1869–1954)
20th century
1946
Oil on canvas
45 3/4 x 32 in. (116.2 x 81.3 cm) Framed: 56 3/8 × 43 × 2 1/2 in. (143.19 × 109.22 × 6.35 cm)
AP 1993.01
Coming nearly at the end of Matisse’s long career, L’Asie culminates his obsession with painting the female figure in rich, exotic costumes and settings.
Walking Flower (La fleur qui marche) is one of Leger's ceramic sculptures that is  boldly colored on one face, black and white on the other, a form from nature imbued with a human spirit, a spirit of humor, of play, and of joyfulness.
Walking Flower (La fleur qui marche)
Walking Flower (La fleur qui marche)
Walking Flower (La fleur qui marche) is one of Leger's ceramic sculptures that is  boldly colored on one face, black and white on the other, a form from nature imbued with a human spirit, a spirit of humor, of play, and of joyfulness.

Walking Flower (La fleur qui marche)

Fernand Léger
French (1881–1955)
20th century
1952
Ceramic, edition of 3
123 x 96 x 55 in. (312.4 x 243.8 x 139.7 cm)
AG 2011.02
After his groundbreaking investigations of complex forms and patterns in the paintings of his Cubist years—paintings such as the 1920 Composition—Léger moved towards a style of greater generalization and simplicity.

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