French Collection

French River Scene
French River Scene

French River Scene

Charles-François Daubigny
French (1817–1878)
19th century
1871
Oil on panel
15 x 26 3/4 in. (38.1 x 68 cm) Framed: 24 3/4 x 36 3/8 in. (62.9 x 92.4 cm)
AP 1969.20
Daubigny was one of the foremost painters of the Barbizon school, a group of French artists active from the 1830s who celebrated the French landscape in their paintings during a period of unbridled industrialization and urbanization.
Near Sydenham Hill
Near Sydenham Hill

Near Sydenham Hill

Camille Pissarro
French (1830–1903)
19th century
1871
Oil on canvas
17 1/8 x 21 1/16 in. (43.5 x 53.5 cm)
AP 1971.21
Camille Pissarro was one of the leading figures of the French Impressionist movement. He took part in the first Impressionist show in 1874 and was the only member to show his work in all eight exhibitions organized by the group.
Drying Nets
Drying Nets

Drying Nets

Alfred Sisley
French (1839–1899)
19th century
1872
Oil on canvas
16 9/16 x 25 9/16 in. (42 x 65 cm)
APx 1977.01
Sisley, whose parents were British, grew up in Paris and met Renoir and Monet at art school in 1862. Very few of Sisley’s 1860s works are known today, since the artist lost nearly everything during the invasion of France by Prussian troops in 1870.
The Stonecutters
The Stonecutters

The Stonecutters

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
French (1796–1875)
19th century
c. 1872–74
Oil on canvas
32 1/2 x 40 in. (82.6 x 101.6 cm) Framed: 43 x 50 x 4 1/2 in. (109.2 x 127 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1994.08
The Stonecutters featured in the posthumous retrospective of Corot’s work held in 1875 in Paris––the first public homage to the fame of the deceased master––where it was purchased by a Parisian, Dr. Cambay.
Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother
Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother

Portrait of Charles Carpeaux, the Sculptor's Brother

Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux
French (1827–1875)
19th century
1874
Terracotta
27 x 19 1/2 x 15 in. (68.6 x 49.5 x 38.1 cm)
AP 1984.21
Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux was much sought after as a portraitist by prominent sitters, including members of the French imperial household. Among his finest busts is this posthumous portrait of his older brother, Charles, a musician, who died in 1870 after long suffering.
On the Pont de l’Europe
On the Pont de l’Europe

On the Pont de l’Europe

Gustave Caillebotte
French (1848–1894)
19th century
1876–77
Oil on canvas
41 5/8 x 51 1/2 in. (105.7 x 130.8 cm) Framed: 55 11/16 x 65 3/4 x 4 15/16 in. (141.5 x 167 x 12.5 cm)
AP 1982.01
Although his closest artist friends were Monet and Renoir, the key advocates for loose brushwork and bright color, Caillebotte preferred the sort of conventional draftsmanship and unaffected urban subjects dear to their fellow Impressionist Degas.
Portrait of Georges Clemenceau
Portrait of Georges Clemenceau

Portrait of Georges Clemenceau

Edouard Manet
French (1832–1883)
19th century
1879–80
Oil on canvas
45 5/8 x 34 3/4 in. (115.9 x 88.2 cm) Framed: 59 1/4 x 48 1/4 x 3 in. (150.5 x 122.6 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1981.01
Shortly after he became prime minister of France in 1906, Georges Clemenceau (1841–1929) ordered Manet’s controversial painting of Olympia to be transferred from the Musée du Luxembourg (where contemporary art was relegated) to the Louvre, thus granting it old master status.
Dancer Stretching
Dancer Stretching

Dancer Stretching

Edgar Degas
French (1834–1917)
19th century
c. 1882–85
Pastel on pale blue gray paper
18 3/8 x 11 11/16 in. (46.7 x 29.7 cm) Framed: 18 3/8 x 11 11/16 in. (46.7 x 29.7 cm)
AP 1968.04
By 1872 Degas had begun to specialize in genre scenes of women at work, especially music-hall performers and ballet dancers.
Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait

Self-Portrait

Paul Gauguin
French (1848–1903)
19th century
1885
Oil on canvas
25 11/16 x 21 3/8 in. (65.2 x 54.3 cm) Framed: 37 1/2 x 33 1/4 x 2 3/4 in. (95.3 x 84.5 x 7 cm)
AP 1997.03
Gauguin assumed his role as renegade artist in 1885. Rather than remain jobless in Copenhagen with his Danish wife and their five children, the former stockbroker decided now to return to Paris to follow his restless artistic conscience.
After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair
After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair

After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair

Edgar Degas
French (1834–1917)
19th century
c. 1895
Charcoal on yellow tracing paper
24 7/16 x 27 5/16 in. (62 x 69.3 cm)
AP 1995.04
In 1855, the twenty-year-old Degas visited the acclaimed Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, who was seventy-four at the time, to report that a family friend had agreed to lend a painting of a nude by Ingres to an exhibition.
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir

Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir

Paul Cézanne
French (1839–1906)
20th century
c. 1895
Oil on canvas
25 9/16 x 31 7/8 in. (65 x 81 cm) Framed: 37 x 43 1/2 x 4 3/4 in. (94 x 110.5 x 12.1 cm)
AP 1982.05
Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture—formed one of Cézanne’s favorite subjects.
Man in a Blue Smock
Man in a Blue Smock

Man in a Blue Smock

Paul Cézanne
French (1839–1906)
19th century
c. 1896–97
Oil on canvas
32 1/16 x 25 1/2 in. (81.5 x 64.8 cm) Framed: 40 15/16 x 35 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (104 x 90.2 x 8.9 cm)
APg 1980.03
Starting around 1887, using his wife and son as models, Cézanne began to paint single figures with the same gravity he had developed in his landscapes and still lifes. Around 1890 he extended his options by enlisting workers from his family’s estate in the south of France.
Penelope
Penelope

Penelope

Antoine Bourdelle
French (1861–1929)
20th century
1909
Cast bronze, dark green patina
47 1/8 x 17 1/4 x 14 3/4 in. (119.7 x 43.8 x 37.5 cm)
AP 1969.03
Bourdelle is generally acclaimed as the most important heir to Rodin, in whose studio he was an assistant from 1893 until 1908.
Girl with a Cross
Girl with a Cross

Girl with a Cross

Georges Braque
French (1882–1963)
20th century
1911
Oil on canvas
21 5/8 x 16 15/16 in. (55 x 43 cm)
AP 1989.02
Beginning in late 1907, Braque and his new acquaintance Pablo Picasso began to paint objects as highly simplified geometric forms, expressing solidarity with the most idiosyncratic tendencies in the art of Cézanne—especially that of putting together unaligned observations of adjacent parts.
Weeping Willow
Weeping Willow

Weeping Willow

Claude Monet
French (1840–1926)
20th century
1918–19
Oil on canvas
39 1/4 x 47 1/4 in. (99.7 x 120 cm) Framed: 51 1/16 x 59 1/4 x 2 1/2 in. (129.7 x 150.5 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1996.02
Monet had painted ten Weeping Willow paintings by 1919, apparently in mournful response to the mass tragedy of World War I.
Composition
Composition

Composition

Fernand Léger
French (1881–1955)
20th century
c. 1920
Oil on canvas
23 3/4 x 28 7/8 in. (60.3 x 73.4 cm) Framed: 36 x 41 3/4 x 5 in. (91.4 x 106 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1985.11
Léger commonly painted several different variations on each of his pictorial ideas, and many of the same elements in this painting appear in four others, arranged in similar interrelationships.

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