French Collection

In Boreas Abducting Oreithyia, Boreas, failing to win the hand of the lovely Athenian princess Orethyia, reverts to his true nature of wildness and cold rage.
Boreas Abducting Oreithyia
Boreas Abducting Oreithyia
In Boreas Abducting Oreithyia, Boreas, failing to win the hand of the lovely Athenian princess Orethyia, reverts to his true nature of wildness and cold rage.

Boreas Abducting Oreithyia

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
107 5/8 x 80 11/16 in. (273.3 x 205 cm) Framed: 110 1/2 x 83 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (280.7 x 212.7 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1972.10
Failing to win the hand of the lovely Athenian princess Orethyia, one of the daughters of King Erechtheus, by gentle means, Boreas, the cold wind god of the North, decided to revert to his true nature of wildness and cold rage.
Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds, Boucher shows Juno visiting Aeolus, keeper of the winds, urging him to unleash their fury, thus provoking a violent storm that would destroy Aeneas’s fleet.
Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds
Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds
Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds, Boucher shows Juno visiting Aeolus, keeper of the winds, urging him to unleash their fury, thus provoking a violent storm that would destroy Aeneas’s fleet.

Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
109 1/2 x 80 in. (278.2 x 203.2 cm) Framed: 112 x 83 x 3 in. (284.5 x 210.8 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1972.08
As told by the Roman author Virgil in the first book of The Aeneid, the goddess Juno, consumed by jealousy toward Venus, schemed to prevent the fleet of her rival’s son, Aeneas, from reaching shore and founding a Trojan colony in Italy.
In Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa, Boucher shows nymphs who marvel at the miraculous infant, whose intoxicating powers are displayed by putti bearing grapes and the leaf-entwined thyrsos with which he will lead his band of followers.
Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa
Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa
In Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa, Boucher shows nymphs who marvel at the miraculous infant, whose intoxicating powers are displayed by putti bearing grapes and the leaf-entwined thyrsos with which he will lead his band of followers.

Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
107 5/16 x 79 3/8 in. (272.5 x 201.6 cm) Framed: 110 1/2 x 82 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (280.7 x 209.6 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1972.07
At the center of this painting is the infant god Bacchus. Born of Jupiter’s illicit union with the princess Semele, Bacchus was transported by Mercury to Nysa for safekeeping from Juno’s jealous rage.
In Venus at Vulcan's Forge, Boucher shows Venus inducing Vulcan to forge arms for her mortal son Aeneas, champion of the Trojans against the Greeks.
Venus at Vulcan's Forge
Venus at Vulcan's Forge
In Venus at Vulcan's Forge, Boucher shows Venus inducing Vulcan to forge arms for her mortal son Aeneas, champion of the Trojans against the Greeks.

Venus at Vulcan's Forge

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
107 11/16 x 80 9/16 in. (273.5 x 204.7 cm) Framed: 110 3/4 x 83 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (281.3 x 212.7 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1972.09
In this canvas, Boucher goes to the heart of Virgil’s narrative in the eighth book of The Aeneid, in which Venus induces Vulcan to forge arms for her mortal son Aeneas, champion of the Trojans against the Greeks.
The Fountain depicts a terrace of a verdant garden, where visitors refresh themselves in the fountain’s cool mists and explore the overgrown grotto, where the natural elements overwhelm human design.
The Fountain
The Fountain
The Fountain depicts a terrace of a verdant garden, where visitors refresh themselves in the fountain’s cool mists and explore the overgrown grotto, where the natural elements overwhelm human design.

The Fountain

Hubert Robert
French (1733–1808)
18th century
c. 1775–78
Oil on canvas
44 1/2 x 35 1/2 in. (113 x 90.2 cm) Framed: 54 x 44 1/2 x 4 1/2 in. (137.2 x 113 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1970.15
In 1754, Hubert Robert went to Rome in the entourage of his protector, the Comte de Stainville, French Ambassador to the Holy See. In Italy he visited the sites of classical antiquity and the captivating gardens around Rome, including the Villa d’Este in Tivoli.
Portrait of Aymard-Jean de Nicolay, Premier Président de la Chambre des Comptes is Houdon's acclaimed bust praised for its perfect resemblance an elegance and nobility of form.
Portrait of Aymard-Jean de Nicolay, Premier Président de la Chambre des Comptes
Portrait of Aymard-Jean de Nicolay, Premier Président de la Chambre des Comptes
Portrait of Aymard-Jean de Nicolay, Premier Président de la Chambre des Comptes is Houdon's acclaimed bust praised for its perfect resemblance an elegance and nobility of form.

Portrait of Aymard-Jean de Nicolay, Premier Président de la Chambre des Comptes

Jean-Antoine Houdon
French (1741–1828)
18th century
1779
Marble
35 7/16 x 29 1/8 in. (90 x 74 cm)
AP 1991.01
In his portraits of the men of letters and nobility of the Enlightenment, Houdon created an entirely new genre, in which he achieved spontaneity and informality of expression without compromising the decorous and elevated presentation of his sitters.
Self-Portrait depicts Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun at the age of about twenty-six, several years after she painted the first of her many portraits of Queen Marie-Antoinette. She is dressed as a lady of society.
Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait
Self-Portrait depicts Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun at the age of about twenty-six, several years after she painted the first of her many portraits of Queen Marie-Antoinette. She is dressed as a lady of society.

Self-Portrait

Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun
French (1755–1842)
18th century
c. 1781
Oil on canvas
25 1/2 x 21 1/4 in. (64.8 x 54 cm) Framed: 34 x 29 x 5 in. (86.4 x 73.7 x 12.7 cm)
ACK 1949.02
This youthful self-portrait depicts Elisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun at the age of about twenty-six, several years after she painted the first of her many portraits of Queen Marie-Antoinette.
The Geography Lesson (Portrait of Monsieur Gaudry and His Daughter) depicts a paymaster in the French administration, Monsieur Gaudry, instructing his daughter in geography.
The Geography Lesson (Portrait of Monsieur Gaudry and His Daughter)
The Geography Lesson (Portrait of Monsieur Gaudry and His Daughter)
The Geography Lesson (Portrait of Monsieur Gaudry and His Daughter) depicts a paymaster in the French administration, Monsieur Gaudry, instructing his daughter in geography.

The Geography Lesson (Portrait of Monsieur Gaudry and His Daughter)

Louis-Léopold Boilly
French (1761–1845)
19th century
1812
Oil on canvas
29 x 23 1/4 in. (73.6 x 59 cm)
AP 1990.01
Arriving in Paris in 1785, Louis-Léopold Boilly was witness to the collapse of the French monarchy, the struggle for modern republicanism, and the rise and fall of Napoleon’s empire.
Portrait Study of a Youth is one of Géricault's adolescent portraits. In this portrait, light in the flushed cheek, glossy hair, and gleaming eyes lend the work a liveliness and intimacy.
Portrait Study of a Youth
Portrait Study of a Youth
Portrait Study of a Youth is one of Géricault's adolescent portraits. In this portrait, light in the flushed cheek, glossy hair, and gleaming eyes lend the work a liveliness and intimacy.

Portrait Study of a Youth

Théodore Géricault
French (1791–1824)
19th century
c. 1818–20
Oil on canvas
18 1/2 x 15 in. (47 x 38.1 cm) Framed: 26 3/8 x 23 1/8 x 3 1/2 in. (67 x 58.7 x 8.9 cm)
AP 1969.07
In the Salon of 1819, Géricault showed his celebrated Raft of the Medusa.
The Anger of Achilles is Jacques-Louis David's painting of the moment Agamemnon, king of the Greeks, has just revealed to the youthful Achilles that his daughter Iphigenia is not to be married to him but sacrificed in order to appease the goddess Diana. Iphigenia’s mother, Clytemnestra, looks on tearfully, Achilles angrily reaches for his sword.
The Anger of Achilles
The Anger of Achilles
The Anger of Achilles is Jacques-Louis David's painting of the moment Agamemnon, king of the Greeks, has just revealed to the youthful Achilles that his daughter Iphigenia is not to be married to him but sacrificed in order to appease the goddess Diana. Iphigenia’s mother, Clytemnestra, looks on tearfully, Achilles angrily reaches for his sword.

The Anger of Achilles

Jacques-Louis David
French (1748–1825)
19th century
1819
Oil on canvas
41 7/16 x 57 1/16 in. (105.3 x 145 cm) Framed: 52 1/4 x 68 x 4 in. (132.7 x 172.7 x 10.2 cm)
AP 1980.07
Jacques-Louis David, the leading Neoclassical painter in Europe during the French Revolution and under Napoleon, took exile in Brussels after the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.
View of Olevano is Corot's landscape oil sketch of Olevano, about twenty-five miles east of Rome.
View of Olevano
View of Olevano
View of Olevano is Corot's landscape oil sketch of Olevano, about twenty-five miles east of Rome.

View of Olevano

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
French (1796–1875)
19th century
1827
Oil on paper affixed to canvas
10 7/8 x 17 7/8 in. (27.6 x 45.4 cm) Framed: 16 3/4 x 23 5/8 x 2 1/2 in. (42.6 x 60 x 6.4 cm)
APg 1980.11
As the final stage in his artistic education, Corot went to Italy in the fall of 1825.
Portrait of H. J. van Wisselingh is Courbet's portrait of the Dutch art dealer H. J. van Wisselingh in which  in which deep shadows obscure physical fact and suggest the melancholy of the sitter and his world.
Portrait of H. J. van Wisselingh
Portrait of H. J. van Wisselingh
Portrait of H. J. van Wisselingh is Courbet's portrait of the Dutch art dealer H. J. van Wisselingh in which  in which deep shadows obscure physical fact and suggest the melancholy of the sitter and his world.

Portrait of H. J. van Wisselingh

Gustave Courbet
French (1819–1877)
19th century
1846
Oil on panel
22 1/2 x 18 1/8 in. (57.2 x 46 cm) Framed: 31 3/8 x 27 1/2 x 4 in. (79.7 x 69.9 x 10.2 cm)
AP 1984.04
Courbet was born at Ornans, near the Swiss border of France. After he went to Paris in 1840, he evolved a vigorous Realism with profound and influential philosophical and political implications. Already in the Salon of 1846, Courbet’s work was noticed by the Dutch art dealer H. J.
Delacroix’s painting of Selim and Zuleika, from the tale of Lord Byron's The Bride of Abydos, the lovers await rescue in a grotto by the sea, pursued by Giaffir and his men, armed and bearing torches.
Selim and Zuleika
Selim and Zuleika
Delacroix’s painting of Selim and Zuleika, from the tale of Lord Byron's The Bride of Abydos, the lovers await rescue in a grotto by the sea, pursued by Giaffir and his men, armed and bearing torches.

Selim and Zuleika

Eugène Delacroix
French (1798–1863)
19th century
1857
Oil on canvas
18 3/4 x 15 3/4 in. (47.6 x 40 cm) Framed: 25 1/2 x 22 5/8 x 3 in. (64.8 x 57.5 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1986.04
Like many of his contemporaries, Delacroix took inspiration from the best-selling Romantic poetry of Lord Byron. This painting is the last and most developed of the four canvases that the artist devoted to “The Bride of Abydos,” first published in 1813 and available in French translation by 1821.
In Corot's dreamlike fantasy landscape Orpheus Lamenting Eurydice, Eurydice, has just died from the bite of a serpent. In mourning, he plays his lyre to three female companions.
Orpheus Lamenting Eurydice
Orpheus Lamenting Eurydice
In Corot's dreamlike fantasy landscape Orpheus Lamenting Eurydice, Eurydice, has just died from the bite of a serpent. In mourning, he plays his lyre to three female companions.

Orpheus Lamenting Eurydice

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot
French (1796–1875)
19th century
c. 1861–65
Oil on canvas
16 1/2 x 24 in. (41.9 x 61 cm) Framed: 24 1/4 x 31 3/8 x 4 in. (61.6 x 79.7 x 10.2 cm)
ACF 1961.03
The celebrated landscape painter Corot was among the leading members of the so-called Barbizon school, which was committed to working directly from nature. But he was active at the same time as a painter of dreamlike fantasy landscapes.
La Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide is Monet's beautiful beach scene near Le Havre, where the artist grew up. The figures and horses on the beach, all observed from the rear, appear in other works painted by Monet during the 1860s.
La Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide
La Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide
La Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide is Monet's beautiful beach scene near Le Havre, where the artist grew up. The figures and horses on the beach, all observed from the rear, appear in other works painted by Monet during the 1860s.

La Pointe de la Hève at Low Tide

Claude Monet
French (1840–1926)
19th century
1865
Oil on canvas
35 1/2 x 59 1/4 in. (90.2 x 150.5 cm) Framed: 47 x 70 1/2 x 5 in. (119.4 x 179.1 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1968.07
This beautiful beach scene near Le Havre, where the artist grew up, was one of two landscapes that launched Monet’s career when exhibited in 1865 at the Paris Salon, the vast, well-attended survey of contemporary art sponsored by the French government.
Roe Deer at a Stream is one of Courbet's modern proto-impressionist landscape paintings.
Roe Deer at a Stream
Roe Deer at a Stream
Roe Deer at a Stream is one of Courbet's modern proto-impressionist landscape paintings.

Roe Deer at a Stream

Gustave Courbet
French (1819–1877)
19th century
1868
Oil on canvas
38 3/8 x 51 1/8 in. (97.5 x 129.8 cm) Framed: 49 3/4 x 62 1/4 x 4 3/4 in. (126.4 x 158.1 x 12.1 cm)
AP 1968.02
Courbet was an avid hunter and painted such works as Roe Deer at a Stream—in which he seems to approach the deer, his quarry unobserved—to appeal to patrons who shared his sporting interests.

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