Asian Collection

Storage Jar
Storage Jar

Storage Jar

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
c. 1600
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Shigaraki ware)
14 x 11 5/8 in. (35.6 x 29.5 cm)
AP 1969.08
The Shigaraki kilns in Shiga prefecture have been an active pottery center since the Kamakura period (1185–1333) and continue to produce pottery up to the present day.
Temples in Eastern Kyoto
Temples in Eastern Kyoto

Temples in Eastern Kyoto

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615), Keicho era (1596–1615)
c. 1600
Six-fold screen; mineral pigments on gold
35 1/2 x 110 1/16 x 13/16 in. (90.2 x 279.5 x 2 cm)
AP 1986.10
In the Momoyama period, Kyoto emerged as a large urban center with a newly wealthy merchant class that developed a taste for paintings reflecting their vibrant, affluent lifestyle.
Baluster Jar
Baluster Jar

Baluster Jar

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th century
Porcelain with overglaze colored enamels (Arita ware)
11 x 9 1/2 in. (28 x 24.1 cm)
AP 1972.12
Japanese porcelains were first developed in the early seventeenth century, near the town of Arita in northern Kyushu, by Korean immigrant potters who discovered porcelain clay in that area. The earliest wares were decorated with Chinese-style designs painted in underglaze blue.
Jar with Floral Design
Jar with Floral Design

Jar with Floral Design

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th century
Porcelain with underglaze blue and overglaze colored enamels (Arita ware, Kakiemon type)
19 1/4 x 13 7/8 in. (48.9 x 35.3 cm)
AP 1968.10
The rapid development and diversification of the Japanese porcelain industry in the seventeenth century was the result of many technically skilled potters being brought to Japan from Korea.
Large Jar
Large Jar

Large Jar

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th or 18th century
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Shigaraki ware)
24 3/16 x 19 5/16 in. (61.5 x 49 cm)
AG 1980.03
The Shigaraki kilns in Shiga prefecture have been an active pottery center since the eighth century.
Mukozuke
Mukozuke

Mukozuke

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 17th century
Stoneware with gray glaze and iron oxide (Karatsu ware)
H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm); Diam. 4 1/16 in. (10.3 cm)
AP 1971.12
The city of Karatsu on the island of Kyushu flourished as a ceramic-producing center by the end of the sixteenth century. The main products of the Karatsu kilns, which derived from Korean prototypes, were utensils for the tea ceremony.
Octagonal Bowl
Octagonal Bowl

Octagonal Bowl

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th century
Porcelain with underglaze blue and overglaze colored enamels (Arita ware)
4 1/8 x 8 1/4 in. (10.4 x 21 cm)
AP 1968.09
The first Japanese porcelains were developed in the early seventeenth century after the techniques were introduced into Japan from Korea.
Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design
Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design

Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 17th century
Black lacquer with designs in brown lacquer, gold, and silver on wood
12 1/8 x 10 1/8 x 15 7/8 in. (30.8 x 25.7 x 40.4 cm)
AP 1976.02
The decorative potential of lacquer (the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus vernicifera) has been explored in Japan since the sixth century in a variety of styles and techniques.
Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia
Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia

Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
first half of 17th century
Cryptomeria wood, gesso with pigments
62 3/4 x 32 1/8 x 1 1/8 in. (159.4 x 81.6 x 2.9 cm)
AP 1995.05
This sliding door panel, adorned with a majestic white eagle perched on a blossoming plum tree, is the right half of a two-panel sugito (cedar door). The motif of the eagle, like the hawk, was most likely a symbol of the samurai (warrior) class in Japan.
Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover
Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover

Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
early 17th century
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Bizen ware)
H. 6 15/16 in (17.7 cm); Diam. 8 in. (20.3 cm)
AP 1972.13 a,b
The Bizen kilns near the town of Imbe in Okayama prefecture are known to have been active since the thirteenth century.
Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo
Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo

Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo

Kano Shigenobu
Japanese (active c. 1620–1630)
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 17th century
Six-fold screen; ink, colors, and gofun on gold leaf paper
59 13/16 x 140 9/16 in. (152 x 357 cm)
AP 1969.10
This brilliant screen depicts young wheat, blossoming poppies, and bamboo, all of the summer season. Boldly patterned with bright mineral colors on a gold ground, it exemplifies the exuberant decorative style of the Kano school.
Steep Mountains and Silent Waters
Steep Mountains and Silent Waters

Steep Mountains and Silent Waters

Dong Qichang
Chinese (1555–1636)
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
1632
Hanging scroll; ink on paper
40 3/8 x 11 15/16 in. (102.5 x 30.3 cm)
AP 1980.02
Dong Qichang, one of the most celebrated figures in the history of Chinese art, is equally renowned for his vpainting, calligraphy, and theoretical writings on painting.
Handled Dish
Handled Dish

Handled Dish

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1650
Stoneware with transparent glaze, iron oxide, and colored enamels (Oribe ware)
4 13/16 x 8 x 7 13/16 in. (12.3 x 20.3 x 19.9 cm)
AG 1983.02
The name of Oribe ware derives from the tea-ceremony practitioner and warrior of the Momoyama period, Furuta Oribe (1544–1615), the most devoted student of Sen no Rikyu (1522–1591), one of the most famous tea-ceremony masters in Japan.
Landscape
Landscape

Landscape

Gong Xian
Chinese (1618–1689)
Qing dynasty (1644–1911)
c. 1650
Hanging scroll; ink on silk
79 x 17 3/16 in. (200.7 x 43.7 cm)
AP 1985.12
The greatest individualist painter of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), Gong Xian was well educated, an accomplished poet and calligrapher, but lived essentially as an impoverished recluse.
Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus
Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus

Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus

Chen Jiayen
Chinese (1599–c. 1685)
Qing dynasty (1644–1911)
1652
Hanging scroll; ink on paper
31 1/2 x 17 1/8 in. (80 x 43.5 cm)
AP 1984.20
This painting of wild narcissi and short sprigs of young bamboo growing at the base of a rock is a masterwork of the artist Chen Jiayen. Forcefully executed with quick, bold brushstrokes in soft, gradated tones of ink wash, the primary forms of the Kimbell painting have a remarkable solidity.
Arhat and Deer
Arhat and Deer

Arhat and Deer

Korean
Joseon dynasty (1392–1910)
late 17th century
Ink, mineral pigments, and gold on silk
31 x 35 in. (78.7 x 88.9 cm)
AP 1995.06
The blending of Korean Shamanist and traditional Buddhist iconographies can be seen in this painting of an arhat and deer.

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