Asian Collection

Storage Jar is a large stoneware vessel with wide round shoulders, light sandy texture, and eye-catching natural green glaze flowing from the mouth over the orange body of the jar.
Storage Jar
Storage Jar
Storage Jar is a large stoneware vessel with wide round shoulders, light sandy texture, and eye-catching natural green glaze flowing from the mouth over the orange body of the jar.

Storage Jar

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
c. 1600
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Shigaraki ware)
14 x 11 5/8 in. (35.6 x 29.5 cm)
AP 1969.08
The Shigaraki kilns in Shiga prefecture have been an active pottery center since the Kamakura period (1185–1333) and continue to produce pottery up to the present day.
Temples in Eastern Kyoto is a six-fold screen which shows shows a portion of Higashiyama, the eastern hills that border the southern part of Kyoto. The main focus of the painting is the structure in the center, which appears to be the shrine-temple complex called Hokoku Jinja.
Temples in Eastern Kyoto
Temples in Eastern Kyoto
Temples in Eastern Kyoto is a six-fold screen which shows shows a portion of Higashiyama, the eastern hills that border the southern part of Kyoto. The main focus of the painting is the structure in the center, which appears to be the shrine-temple complex called Hokoku Jinja.

Temples in Eastern Kyoto

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615), Keicho era (1596–1615)
c. 1600
Six-fold screen; mineral pigments on gold
35 1/2 x 110 1/16 x 13/16 in. (90.2 x 279.5 x 2 cm)
AP 1986.10
In the Momoyama period, Kyoto emerged as a large urban center with a newly wealthy merchant class that developed a taste for paintings reflecting their vibrant, affluent lifestyle.
Baluster Jar is a porcelain jar with wide shoulders and a wide mouth. It is decorated with red, green, and yellow enamels in Chinese-style designs with underglaze blue
Baluster Jar
Baluster Jar
Baluster Jar is a porcelain jar with wide shoulders and a wide mouth. It is decorated with red, green, and yellow enamels in Chinese-style designs with underglaze blue

Baluster Jar

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th century
Porcelain with overglaze colored enamels (Arita ware)
11 x 9 1/2 in. (28 x 24.1 cm)
AP 1972.12
Japanese porcelains were first developed in the early seventeenth century, near the town of Arita in northern Kyushu, by Korean immigrant potters who discovered porcelain clay in that area. The earliest wares were decorated with Chinese-style designs painted in underglaze blue.
Jar with Floral Design is a porcelain, colored enamel, and under glazed vessel decorated in upright leaf pattern on the rim, floral scrolls on the shoulder, and bordered panels on the body that enclose clumps of flowering plants.
Jar with Floral Design
Jar with Floral Design
Jar with Floral Design is a porcelain, colored enamel, and under glazed vessel decorated in upright leaf pattern on the rim, floral scrolls on the shoulder, and bordered panels on the body that enclose clumps of flowering plants.

Jar with Floral Design

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th century
Porcelain with underglaze blue and overglaze colored enamels (Arita ware, Kakiemon type)
19 1/4 x 13 7/8 in. (48.9 x 35.3 cm)
AP 1968.10
The rapid development and diversification of the Japanese porcelain industry in the seventeenth century was the result of many technically skilled potters being brought to Japan from Korea.
Large Jar is a stoneware vessel with sandy texture, robust shape, and rich reddish brown surface highlighted with yellow ash glaze
Large Jar
Large Jar
Large Jar is a stoneware vessel with sandy texture, robust shape, and rich reddish brown surface highlighted with yellow ash glaze

Large Jar

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th or 18th century
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Shigaraki ware)
24 3/16 x 19 5/16 in. (61.5 x 49 cm)
AG 1980.03
The Shigaraki kilns in Shiga prefecture have been an active pottery center since the eighth century.
Mukozuke is a small, deep bowl used for serving side dishes in the traditional kaiseki meal. The rim was shaped by hand to form petals and it is also decorate with a  freely painted design of leafy grass and curled vines.
Mukozuke
Mukozuke
Mukozuke is a small, deep bowl used for serving side dishes in the traditional kaiseki meal. The rim was shaped by hand to form petals and it is also decorate with a  freely painted design of leafy grass and curled vines.

Mukozuke

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 17th century
Stoneware with gray glaze and iron oxide (Karatsu ware)
H. 3 1/2 in. (8.9 cm); Diam. 4 1/16 in. (10.3 cm)
AP 1971.12
The city of Karatsu on the island of Kyushu flourished as a ceramic-producing center by the end of the sixteenth century. The main products of the Karatsu kilns, which derived from Korean prototypes, were utensils for the tea ceremony.
Octagonal Bowl is a Japanese porcelain bowl with delicate Chinese floral designs painted in underglaze blue and colored enamel.
Octagonal Bowl
Octagonal Bowl
Octagonal Bowl is a Japanese porcelain bowl with delicate Chinese floral designs painted in underglaze blue and colored enamel.

Octagonal Bowl

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
17th century
Porcelain with underglaze blue and overglaze colored enamels (Arita ware)
4 1/8 x 8 1/4 in. (10.4 x 21 cm)
AP 1968.09
The first Japanese porcelains were developed in the early seventeenth century after the techniques were introduced into Japan from Korea.
Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design is a portable cabinet with three drawers and a motif of gourds, leaves, and scrolling vines.
Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design
Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design
Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design is a portable cabinet with three drawers and a motif of gourds, leaves, and scrolling vines.

Portable Cabinet with Gourd Design

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 17th century
Black lacquer with designs in brown lacquer, gold, and silver on wood
12 1/8 x 10 1/8 x 15 7/8 in. (30.8 x 25.7 x 40.4 cm)
AP 1976.02
The decorative potential of lacquer (the sap of the lacquer tree Rhus vernicifera) has been explored in Japan since the sixth century in a variety of styles and techniques.
Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia is constructed from wood and decorated with a painted design of a majestic white eagle perched on a blossoming plum tree
Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia
Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia
Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia is constructed from wood and decorated with a painted design of a majestic white eagle perched on a blossoming plum tree

Sliding Door Panel with Design of Imperial Eagle, Plum Tree, and Camellia

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
First half of 17th century
Cryptomeria wood, gesso with pigments
62 3/4 x 32 1/8 x 1 1/8 in. (159.4 x 81.6 x 2.9 cm)
AP 1995.05
This sliding door panel, adorned with a majestic white eagle perched on a blossoming plum tree, is the right half of a two-panel sugito (cedar door). The motif of the eagle, like the hawk, was most likely a symbol of the samurai (warrior) class in Japan.
Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover is a stoneware jar with a wood-ash glaze with a sturdy shape and warm, natural finish. There are random spots of yellow glaze on this vessel.
Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover
Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover
Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover is a stoneware jar with a wood-ash glaze with a sturdy shape and warm, natural finish. There are random spots of yellow glaze on this vessel.

Water Jar (Mizusashi) with Cover

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
early 17th century
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Bizen ware)
H. 6 15/16 in (17.7 cm); Diam. 8 in. (20.3 cm)
AP 1972.13 a,b
The Bizen kilns near the town of Imbe in Okayama prefecture are known to have been active since the thirteenth century.
Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo is a six-fold silk screen. Boldly patterned with bright mineral colors on a gold ground, it depicts young wheat, blossoming poppies, and bamboo, all of the summer season.
Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo
Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo
Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo is a six-fold silk screen. Boldly patterned with bright mineral colors on a gold ground, it depicts young wheat, blossoming poppies, and bamboo, all of the summer season.

Wheat, Poppies, and Bamboo

Kano Shigenobu
Japanese (active c. 1620–1630)
Edo period (1615–1868)
early 17th century
Six-fold screen; ink, colors, and gofun on gold leaf paper
59 13/16 x 140 9/16 in. (152 x 357 cm)
AP 1969.10
This brilliant screen depicts young wheat, blossoming poppies, and bamboo, all of the summer season. Boldly patterned with bright mineral colors on a gold ground, it exemplifies the exuberant decorative style of the Kano school.
Steep Mountains and Silent Waters is a hanging paper scroll in which a mountain winds vertically up the center of the painting and includes the motif of trees, house, and foreground rocks.
Steep Mountains and Silent Waters
Steep Mountains and Silent Waters
Steep Mountains and Silent Waters is a hanging paper scroll in which a mountain winds vertically up the center of the painting and includes the motif of trees, house, and foreground rocks.

Steep Mountains and Silent Waters

Dong Qichang
Chinese (1555–1636)
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
1632
Hanging scroll; ink on paper
40 3/8 x 11 15/16 in. (102.5 x 30.3 cm)
AP 1980.02
Dong Qichang, one of the most celebrated figures in the history of Chinese art, is equally renowned for his painting, calligraphy, and theoretical writings on painting.
Handled Dish is a glazed stoneware dish with handle. The simple decoration of brown floral and geometric motifs and the eye-catching splash of bright green glaze over a finely crackled, cream-colored ground.
Handled Dish
Handled Dish
Handled Dish is a glazed stoneware dish with handle. The simple decoration of brown floral and geometric motifs and the eye-catching splash of bright green glaze over a finely crackled, cream-colored ground.

Handled Dish

Japan
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1650
Stoneware with transparent glaze, iron oxide, and colored enamels (Oribe ware)
4 13/16 x 8 x 7 13/16 in. (12.3 x 20.3 x 19.9 cm)
AG 1983.02
The name of Oribe ware derives from the tea-ceremony practitioner and warrior of the Momoyama period, Furuta Oribe (1544–1615), the most devoted student of Sen no Rikyu (1522–1591), one of the most famous tea-ceremony masters in Japan.
Landscape is a silk hanging scroll of a vertical landscape of light tonality and linear, spare, ascetic style featuring craggy rocks and gangly trees.
Landscape
Landscape
Landscape is a silk hanging scroll of a vertical landscape of light tonality and linear, spare, ascetic style featuring craggy rocks and gangly trees.

Landscape

Gong Xian
Chinese (1618–1689)
Qing dynasty (1644–1911)
c. 1650
Hanging scroll; ink on silk
79 x 17 3/16 in. (200.7 x 43.7 cm)
AP 1985.12
The greatest individualist painter of the Qing dynasty (1644–1911), Gong Xian was well educated, an accomplished poet and calligrapher, but lived essentially as an impoverished recluse.
Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus is a painting on a paper scroll of wild narcissi and short sprigs of young bamboo growing at the base of a rock.
Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus
Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus
Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus is a painting on a paper scroll of wild narcissi and short sprigs of young bamboo growing at the base of a rock.

Bamboo, Rock, and Narcissus

Chen Jiayen
Chinese (1599–c. 1685)
Qing dynasty (1644–1911)
1652
Hanging scroll; ink on paper
31 1/2 x 17 1/8 in. (80 x 43.5 cm)
AP 1984.20
This painting of wild narcissi and short sprigs of young bamboo growing at the base of a rock is a masterwork of the artist Chen Jiayen. Forcefully executed with quick, bold brushstrokes in soft, gradated tones of ink wash, the primary forms of the Kimbell painting have a remarkable solidity.
Arhat and Deer is a painting on silk of a holy man. The sparsely bearded figure of an old man holding a walking staff resembles conventional depictions of San Shin, the Mountain Spirit, however, his bald head surrounded by a halo, and monk’s robes, suggests a Buddhist holy man, or arhat.
Arhat and Deer
Arhat and Deer
Arhat and Deer is a painting on silk of a holy man. The sparsely bearded figure of an old man holding a walking staff resembles conventional depictions of San Shin, the Mountain Spirit, however, his bald head surrounded by a halo, and monk’s robes, suggests a Buddhist holy man, or arhat.

Arhat and Deer

Korean
Joseon dynasty (1392–1910)
Late 17th century
Ink, mineral pigments, and gold on silk
31 x 35 in. (78.7 x 88.9 cm)
AP 1995.06
The blending of Korean Shamanist and traditional Buddhist iconographies can be seen in this painting of an arhat and deer.

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