Permanent Collection

Skeletons Warming Themselves depicts three dressed-up skeletons in the foreground around a stove on which is written “Pas de feu” and under it “en trouverez vous demain?”—“No fire. Will you find any tomorrow?” Ensor placed objects in the foreground to symbolize art, music, and literature in order to say art and patronage expires.
Skeletons Warming Themselves
Skeletons Warming Themselves
Skeletons Warming Themselves depicts three dressed-up skeletons in the foreground around a stove on which is written “Pas de feu” and under it “en trouverez vous demain?”—“No fire. Will you find any tomorrow?” Ensor placed objects in the foreground to symbolize art, music, and literature in order to say art and patronage expires.

Skeletons Warming Themselves

James Ensor
Belgian (1860–1949)
19th century
1889
Oil on canvas
29 7/16 x 23 5/8 in. (74.8 x 60 cm) Framed: 39 1/2 x 33 1/2 x 3 in. (100.3 x 85.1 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1981.20
James Ensor was one of the most original painters of the late nineteenth century. Populated with masks and skeletons, his macabre images are morbid commentaries on the human condition, his hometown of Ostend on the North Sea, Belgian history, and his own mortality.
After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair is a drawing by Degas of a nude’s back, one among many closely related works dated to the mid-1890s.
After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair
After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair
After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair is a drawing by Degas of a nude’s back, one among many closely related works dated to the mid-1890s.

After the Bath, Woman Drying Her Hair

Edgar Degas
French (1834–1917)
19th century
c. 1895
Charcoal on yellow tracing paper
24 7/16 x 27 5/16 in. (62 x 69.3 cm)
AP 1995.04
In 1855, the twenty-year-old Degas visited the acclaimed Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, who was seventy-four at the time, to report that a family friend had agreed to lend a painting of a nude by Ingres to an exhibition.
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir shows one of Cézanne's favorite motifs of Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture.
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir
Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir shows one of Cézanne's favorite motifs of Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture.

Maison Maria with a View of Château Noir

Paul Cézanne
French (1839–1906)
20th century
c. 1895
Oil on canvas
25 9/16 x 31 7/8 in. (65 x 81 cm) Framed: 37 x 43 1/2 x 4 3/4 in. (94 x 110.5 x 12.1 cm)
AP 1982.05
Provençal buildings with stucco walls and red-tiled roofs—often, as here, observed from a road turning into the picture—formed one of Cézanne’s favorite subjects.
Man in a Blue Smock is one of Cézanne's single figure portraits of a rural worker. Juxtaposed in an ambiguous way next to the worker, Cézann'e first work of art, a screen, suggests some mute dialogue.
Man in a Blue Smock
Man in a Blue Smock
Man in a Blue Smock is one of Cézanne's single figure portraits of a rural worker. Juxtaposed in an ambiguous way next to the worker, Cézann'e first work of art, a screen, suggests some mute dialogue.

Man in a Blue Smock

Paul Cézanne
French (1839–1906)
19th century
c. 1896–97
Oil on canvas
32 1/16 x 25 1/2 in. (81.5 x 64.8 cm) Framed: 40 15/16 x 35 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (104 x 90.2 x 8.9 cm)
APg 1980.03
Starting around 1887, using his wife and son as models, Cézanne began to paint single figures with the same gravity he had developed in his landscapes and still lifes. Around 1890 he extended his options by enlisting workers from his family’s estate in the south of France.
Diviner’s Mask is a mask worn by the Yombe people in divination ceremonies, , through which past or future events were revealed. The black color of the mask is also associated with judgment and divination.
Diviner’s Mask
Diviner’s Mask
Diviner’s Mask is a mask worn by the Yombe people in divination ceremonies, , through which past or future events were revealed. The black color of the mask is also associated with judgment and divination.

Diviner’s Mask

Africa, Democratic Republic of Congo and Angola, Yombe people
early 20th century
Wood, organic materials
9 x 6 5/8 x 4 3/16 in. (22.8 x 16.8 x 10.7 cm)
AP 1979.42
Among the Yombe people, masks were used in divination ceremonies, through which past or future events were revealed.
Girls on the Pier
Girls on the Pier

Girls on the Pier

Edvard Munch
Norwegian (1863–1944)
20th century
c. 1904 or 1933-35
Oil on canvas
31 11/16 x 27 5/16 in. (80.5 x 69.3 cm) Framed: 40 1/2 x 36 3/4 x 3 in. (102.9 x 93.4 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1966.06
In 1889 Munch started spending periods of time at the resort of Åsgårdstrand, which was popular with artists and writers. While summering there in 1893, he developed the pictorial ideas that some years later would evolve into Girls on the Pier.
Nude Combing Her Hair is one of Picasos's paintings of a female nude after his blue perior. The nude woman's pose is based on the classical Venus Anadyomene type of figure, but with a sketchy mask-like face and modern disjunctions.
Nude Combing Her Hair
Nude Combing Her Hair
Nude Combing Her Hair is one of Picasos's paintings of a female nude after his blue perior. The nude woman's pose is based on the classical Venus Anadyomene type of figure, but with a sketchy mask-like face and modern disjunctions.

Nude Combing Her Hair

Pablo Picasso
Spanish (1881–1973)
20th century
1906
Oil on canvas
41 1/2 x 32 in. (105.4 x 81.3 cm) Framed: 51 1/4 x 41 x 3 1/4 in. (130.2 x 104.1 x 8.3 cm)
AP 1982.06
Based on the classical Venus Anadyomene type of figure—in which the goddess, rising from the sea, wrings out her hair—Nude Combing Her Hair attests to the engagement with classicism that preoccupied Picasso throughout his career.
Head is one of about twenty-seven surviving sculptures by Modigliani. Head is distinguished from others by its complex balance of brutality and refinement, as the delicate head emerges from the roughly hewn mass of the stone block.
Head
Head
Head is one of about twenty-seven surviving sculptures by Modigliani. Head is distinguished from others by its complex balance of brutality and refinement, as the delicate head emerges from the roughly hewn mass of the stone block.

Head

Amedeo Modigliani
Italian (1884–1920)
20th Century
c. 1913
Limestone
20 5/8 × 9 3/4 × 14 3/4 in., 112.5 lb. (52.4 × 24.8 × 37.5 cm, 51 kg)
AG 2017.01
The Kimbell Art Museum is honored to receive the gift of a masterpiece of modern sculpture, a carved limestone Head by the Italian artist Amedeo Modigliani. This rare work is one of about twenty-seven surviving sculptures by the artist.
In Bourdelle's Penelope, the figure’s identity as Penelope, the wife of Odysseus in Homer's The Odyssey, is manifest only from the ancient Greek costume and meditative pose.
Penelope
Penelope
In Bourdelle's Penelope, the figure’s identity as Penelope, the wife of Odysseus in Homer's The Odyssey, is manifest only from the ancient Greek costume and meditative pose.

Penelope

Antoine Bourdelle
French (1861–1929)
20th century
1909
Cast bronze, dark green patina
47 1/8 x 17 1/4 x 14 3/4 in. (119.7 x 43.8 x 37.5 cm)
AP 1969.03
Bourdelle is generally acclaimed as the most important heir to Rodin, in whose studio he was an assistant from 1893 until 1908.
In Braque's Girl with a Cross, the head (or rather its disembodied details) emerges like an apparition amid a rich interplay of highlighted and shaded facets, thinly scumbled and atmospheric in mood.
Girl with a Cross
Girl with a Cross
In Braque's Girl with a Cross, the head (or rather its disembodied details) emerges like an apparition amid a rich interplay of highlighted and shaded facets, thinly scumbled and atmospheric in mood.

Girl with a Cross

Georges Braque
French (1882–1963)
20th century
1911
Oil on canvas
21 5/8 x 16 15/16 in. (55 x 43 cm)
AP 1989.02
Beginning in late 1907, Braque and his new acquaintance Pablo Picasso began to paint objects as highly simplified geometric forms, expressing solidarity with the most idiosyncratic tendencies in the art of Cézanne—especially that of putting together unaligned observations of adjacent parts.
Man with a Pipe
Man with a Pipe

Man with a Pipe

Pablo Picasso
Spanish (1881–1973)
20th century
1911
Oil on canvas
35 11/16 x 27 15/16 in. (90.7 x 71 cm) Framed: 44 1/2 x 37 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (113 x 95.3 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1966.08
In early July 1911, Picasso left Paris for Céret, a small town in southwestern France, near the Spanish border. Braque joined him there in August and the two painted their ultimate “Analytical Cubist” works in intense dialogue.
Composition is Mondrian's cubist-inspired works scumbled atmospheric tones of ocher, blue gray, and pink.
Composition
Composition
Composition is Mondrian's cubist-inspired works scumbled atmospheric tones of ocher, blue gray, and pink.

Composition

Piet Mondrian
Dutch (1872–1944)
20th century
1914
Oil on canvas
47 1/2 x 39 7/8 in. (120.6 x 101.3 cm) Framed: 48 1/8 x 40 5/16 x 13/16 in. (122.2 x 102.4 x 2.1 cm)
APg 1983.03
From the age of fourteen, when Mondrian decided to become a painter, he specialized in calm landscapes, often with isolated buildings and shadowy twilight effects of dull gold and silver.
Portrait of Heriberto Casany is Miró's portrait of his art-school friend Heriberto Casany while in the art group called the Courbets. With his spindly fingers and the undulating folds in his tweed suit jacket, Casany resembles saints depicted in medieval Catalan frescoes with gold backgrounds.
Portrait of Heriberto Casany
Portrait of Heriberto Casany
Portrait of Heriberto Casany is Miró's portrait of his art-school friend Heriberto Casany while in the art group called the Courbets. With his spindly fingers and the undulating folds in his tweed suit jacket, Casany resembles saints depicted in medieval Catalan frescoes with gold backgrounds.

Portrait of Heriberto Casany

Joan Miró
Spanish (1893–1983)
20th century
1918
Oil on canvas
27 5/8 x 24 7/16 in. (70.2 x 62 cm) Framed: 38 1/2 x 36 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (97.8 x 92.7 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1984.09
“Here in Barcelona, we lack courage,” Miró wrote in late 1917 to his studio-mate Enric Ricart. “We, the younger generation, could get together and exhibit every year, all together under the name of the “Chrome Yellow Salon,” for example, and pronounce virile manifestos. . . .
Weeping Willow is one of ten paintings of the subject Monet painted in mournful response to the mass tragedy of World War I. The tree’s trunk, its cascading branches, and its reflection are all incorporated into his greatest artistic legacy, the mural-scale Nymphéas canvases that were his preoccupation from 1914 until his death.
Weeping Willow
Weeping Willow
Weeping Willow is one of ten paintings of the subject Monet painted in mournful response to the mass tragedy of World War I. The tree’s trunk, its cascading branches, and its reflection are all incorporated into his greatest artistic legacy, the mural-scale Nymphéas canvases that were his preoccupation from 1914 until his death.

Weeping Willow

Claude Monet
French (1840–1926)
20th century
1918–19
Oil on canvas
39 1/4 x 47 1/4 in. (99.7 x 120 cm) Framed: 51 1/16 x 59 1/4 x 2 1/2 in. (129.7 x 150.5 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1996.02
Monet had painted ten Weeping Willow paintings by 1919, apparently in mournful response to the mass tragedy of World War I.
Composition is Leger's painting of what appears to be rods, wires, and the stenciled letters P, U, and V (presumably taken from some poster or sign observed on the street). It is impossible to identify specific objects, but this colorful painting is one version of many of Leger's painting with these abstract objects arranged in similar interrelationships.
Composition
Composition
Composition is Leger's painting of what appears to be rods, wires, and the stenciled letters P, U, and V (presumably taken from some poster or sign observed on the street). It is impossible to identify specific objects, but this colorful painting is one version of many of Leger's painting with these abstract objects arranged in similar interrelationships.

Composition

Fernand Léger
French (1881–1955)
20th century
c. 1920
Oil on canvas
23 3/4 x 28 7/8 in. (60.3 x 73.4 cm) Framed: 36 x 41 3/4 x 5 in. (91.4 x 106 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1985.11
Léger commonly painted several different variations on each of his pictorial ideas, and many of the same elements in this painting appear in four others, arranged in similar interrelationships.
L'Air is one of eight bronze and lead sculptures corresponding to the stone figure for a monument commissioned from Maillol by the city of Toulouse, France. Maillol based his idea upon a small terracotta he had made around 1900 showing a woman reclining on billowing drapery, as if to represent a Greek goddess at court in the clouds or on the sea.
L'Air
L'Air
L'Air is one of eight bronze and lead sculptures corresponding to the stone figure for a monument commissioned from Maillol by the city of Toulouse, France. Maillol based his idea upon a small terracotta he had made around 1900 showing a woman reclining on billowing drapery, as if to represent a Greek goddess at court in the clouds or on the sea.

L'Air

Aristide Maillol
French (1861–1944)
20th century
Designed in 1938, cast in 1962
Bronze, cast 5, edition of 6
50 13/16 x 92 11/16 x 38 in. (129 x 235.5 x 96.5 cm)
AP 1967.06
This is one of eight bronze and lead sculptures corresponding to the stone figure for a monument commissioned from Maillol by the city of Toulouse, France.

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