Permanent Collection

Apollo and the Continents
Apollo and the Continents

Apollo and the Continents

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
Italian (1696–1770)
18th century
c. 1739
Oil on canvas
39 x 25 in. (99.1 x 63.5 cm) Framed: 49 1/4 x 31 1/2 x 3 1/4 in. (125.1 x 80 x 8.3 cm)
AP 1985.04
This exquisitely prepared oil sketch served as Tiepolo’s model for a frescoed vault in the Palazzo Clerici in Milan, commissioned by Marquess Antonio Giorgio Clerici.
A Young Dandy
A Young Dandy

A Young Dandy

Miyagawa Choshun
Japanese (1682–1752)
Edo period (1615–1868)
c. 1740
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
37 3/4 x 14 1/8 in. (95.9 x 35.9 cm)
AP 1984.06
The Edo period (1615–1868) school of ukiyo-e (pictures of the floating world) focused on genre scenes and stylized portraits of the famous courtesans, samurai, and kabuki actors who inhabited the pleasure districts of the great urban centers of Edo (Tokyo), Kyoto, and Osaka.
Portrait of a Woman, Possibly of the Lloyd Family
Portrait of a Woman, Possibly of the Lloyd Family

Portrait of a Woman, Possibly of the Lloyd Family

Thomas Gainsborough
British (English) (1727–1788)
18th century
c. 1750
Oil on canvas
27 3/8 x 20 7/8 in. (69.6 x 53 cm) Framed: 34 1/4 x 27 3/4 x 3 in. (87 x 70.5 x 7.6 cm)
ACF 1946.04
Along with his contemporary Joshua Reynolds, Gainsborough was one of the leading figures in the glamorous “golden age” of British portraiture.
Suffolk Landscape
Suffolk Landscape

Suffolk Landscape

Thomas Gainsborough
British (English) (1727–1788)
18th century
mid-1750s
Oil on canvas
25 1/8 x 30 1/4 in. (63.8 x 76.9 cm) Framed: 34 1/4 x 41 x 3 1/2 in. (87 x 104.1 x 8.9 cm)
ACF 1942.02
Gainsborough’s passion for landscape dated from his earliest years. The canvases he painted in his native Suffolk show his admiration for the Dutch seventeenth-century landscapes that were increasingly available in the English market, and which Gainsborough restored, copied, and later collected.
The Coronation of the Virgin
The Coronation of the Virgin

The Coronation of the Virgin

Giovanni Battista Tiepolo
Italian (1696–1770)
18th century
1754
Oil on canvas
40 3/8 x 30 7/16 in. (102.6 x 77.3 cm) Framed: 50 x 42 x 5 in. (127 x 106.7 x 12.7 cm)
AP 1984.10
Tiepolo’s reputation as the leading painter of his day won him major commissions for frescoes from monarchs and princes of the Church in Italy.
La Simplicité (Simplicity)
La Simplicité (Simplicity)

La Simplicité (Simplicity)

Jean-Baptiste Greuze
French (1725–1805)
18th century
1759
Oil on canvas
28 x 23 1/2 in. (71.1 x 59.7 cm) Framed: 35 1/8 x 30 1/2 x 3 in. (89.2 x 77.5 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1985.03
Jean-Baptiste Greuze achieved fame for his morally uplifting narrative paintings, but he was equally adept working in the pastoral, erotic mode brought to refinement by François Boucher.
Portrait of a Woman, Possibly Elizabeth Warren
Portrait of a Woman, Possibly Elizabeth Warren

Portrait of a Woman, Possibly Elizabeth Warren

Joshua Reynolds
British (English) (1723–1792)
18th century
1759
Oil on canvas
93 3/4 x 58 3/16 in. (238.1 x 147.8 cm) Framed: 105 1/2 x 69 3/4 x 5 1/4 in. (268 x 177.2 x 13.3 cm)
ACF 1961.02
Having established a portrait practice in London, in 1749 Joshua Reynolds embarked on a journey to Italy, where during a two-year stay in Rome he studied the artistic canon of the antique, Michelangelo, Raphael, and the great Venetian masters.
Still Life with Oranges, Jars, and Boxes of Sweets
Still Life with Oranges, Jars, and Boxes of Sweets

Still Life with Oranges, Jars, and Boxes of Sweets

Luis Meléndez
Spanish (1716–1780)
18th century
c. 1760–65
Oil on canvas
19 x 13 7/8 in. (48.3 x 35.2 cm) Framed: 24 1/2 x 20 x 2 in. (62.2 x 50.8 x 5.1 cm)
AP 1985.13
Luis Meléndez was the greatest Spanish still-life painter of his time. As the most gifted student admitted to the newly founded Royal Academy of Fine Arts in Madrid in 1745, he could have anticipated a prosperous career at the Spanish court.
The Pond
The Pond

The Pond

Jean-Honoré Fragonard
French (1732–1806)
18th century
c. 1761–65
Oil on canvas
25 3/4 x 28 3/4 in. (65.4 x 73.1 cm) Framed: 33 1/4 x 36 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (84.5 x 92.7 x 8.9 cm)
AP 1968.03
Fragonard was the last and perhaps the greatest of the French Rococo painters. A pupil of François Boucher, from whom he developed his fluent handling of paint, he produced some of the most masterful and hedonistic decorations of the eighteenth century.
Lord Grosvenor's Arabian Stallion with a Groom
Lord Grosvenor's Arabian Stallion with a Groom

Lord Grosvenor's Arabian Stallion with a Groom

George Stubbs
British (English) (1724–1806)
18th century
c. 1765
Oil on canvas
39 1/8 x 32 7/8 in. (99.3 x 83.5 cm) Framed: 44 x 37 1/2 x 2 5/8 in. (111.8 x 95.3 x 6.7 cm)
AP 1981.03
George Stubbs was the greatest painter of animals of his day. He was celebrated especially for his representation of horses, the forms and nature of which he captured with a remarkable understanding and sensitivity.
The River Rhine Separating the Waters
The River Rhine Separating the Waters

The River Rhine Separating the Waters

Clodion (Claude Michel)
French (1738–1814)
18th century
1765
Terracotta
11 x 18 x 12 in. (27.9 x 45.7 x 30.5 cm)
AP 1984.05
One of the outstanding sculptors of his age, Claude Michel, better known as Clodion, is today most admired for his small-scale terracottas.
Tivoli: The Temple of the Sybil and the Campagna
Tivoli: The Temple of the Sybil and the Campagna

Tivoli: The Temple of the Sybil and the Campagna

Richard Wilson
British (Welsh) (1714–1782)
18th century
c. 1765
Oil on canvas
29 x 38 1/2 in. (73.6 x 97.8 cm) Framed: 36 1/2 x 46 x 3 3/4 in. (92.7 x 116.8 x 9.5 cm)
APx 1979.29
Tivoli, in the Sabine hills to the east of Rome, was from the seventeenth century a favorite destination for artists. The grandeur of its landscape, with its evocations of ancient glory, also made it a major destination for foreign visitors on the Grand Tour.
Crows
Crows

Crows

Maruyama Okyo
Japanese (1733–1795)
Edo period (1615–1868)
1766
Pair of six-fold screens; ink and gold on paper
59 15/16 x 143 11/16 in. (152.2 x 365 cm)
AP 1969.11 a,b
In these screens, a clump of young bamboo and a gnarled plum tree beside a stream provide the setting for a group of crows in flight and at rest. Soft washes of gray ink and gold convey the feeling of dense fog and evoke a sense of deep space.
Boreas Abducting Oreithyia
Boreas Abducting Oreithyia

Boreas Abducting Oreithyia

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
107 5/8 x 80 11/16 in. (273.3 x 205 cm) Framed: 110 1/2 x 83 3/4 x 2 1/2 in. (280.7 x 212.7 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1972.10
Failing to win the hand of the lovely Athenian princess Orethyia, one of the daughters of King Erechtheus, by gentle means, Boreas, the cold wind god of the North, decided to revert to his true nature of wildness and cold rage.
Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds
Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds

Juno Asking Aeolus to Release the Winds

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
109 1/2 x 80 in. (278.2 x 203.2 cm) Framed: 112 x 83 x 3 in. (284.5 x 210.8 x 7.6 cm)
AP 1972.08
As told by the Roman author Virgil in the first book of The Aeneid, the goddess Juno, consumed by jealousy toward Venus, schemed to prevent the fleet of her rival’s son, Aeneas, from reaching shore and founding a Trojan colony in Italy.
Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa
Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa

Mercury Confiding the Infant Bacchus to the Nymphs of Nysa

François Boucher
French (1703–1770)
18th century
1769
Oil on canvas
107 5/16 x 79 3/8 in. (272.5 x 201.6 cm) Framed: 110 1/2 x 82 1/2 x 2 1/2 in. (280.7 x 209.6 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1972.07
At the center of this painting is the infant god Bacchus. Born of Jupiter’s illicit union with the princess Semele, Bacchus was transported by Mercury to Nysa for safekeeping from Juno’s jealous rage.

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