Permanent Collection

Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope
Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope are two marble sculptures representing Virtues: one is identifiable as Fortitude by her attribute, the column; the other figure is without an attribute and may represent Hope.

Fortitude and Unidentified Virtue, Possibly Hope

Bambaia (Agostino Busti)
Italian (c. 1483–1548)
16th century
c. 1520–25
Marble
a: 23 13/16 x 9 1/2 x 7 5/8 in. (60.5 x 24.2 x 19.3 cm) b: 26 3/16 x 12 3/8 x 6 1/2 in. (66.5 x 31.5 x 16.5 cm)
AP 1981.12 a,b
Agostino Busti, known as Bambaia, was an important Lombard sculptor, notable for his refined technique and innovative classicism.
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.
The Madonna and Child
The Madonna and Child
Parmigianino's oil painting of The Virgin and Child, which counterposes the serenely pensive Virgin with her active Son, who tugs at his mother’s veil.

The Madonna and Child

Parmigianino (Girolamo Francesco Maria Mazzola)
Italian (1503–1540)
16th century
c. 1527–30
Oil on panel
17 5/8 x 13 3/8 in. (44.8 x 34 cm) Framed: 24 1/16 x 20 x 2 1/2 in. (61.1 x 50.8 x 6.4 cm)
AP 1995.09
Hailed as the new Raphael, Parmigianino was one of the most influential artists of the sixteenth century, cultivating a mannered gracefulness of pose and physiognomy, combined with new and dramatic coloristic effects, that transformed the classicism of his Renaissance predecessors.
Head of a Woman is a majestic head of an ideal beauty. He has emulated the smooth and abstracted facial structure found in classical sculpture
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman
Head of a Woman is a majestic head of an ideal beauty. He has emulated the smooth and abstracted facial structure found in classical sculpture

Head of a Woman

Sebastiano del Piombo (Sebastiano Luciani)
Italian (c. 1485–1547)
16th century
early 1530s
Oil on panel
10 in. diameter (25.4 cm diameter) Framed: 17 x 2 in. (43.2 x 5.1 cm)
AP 1985.08
Notable for the monumental grandeur of his religious paintings and portraits, Sebastiano del Piombo became the preeminent painter in Rome following Raphael’s death in 1520.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist
The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist is Titian's oil painting in which Mary cradles the Christ Child, who is embraced by a kneeling female saint.

The Madonna and Child with a Female Saint and the Infant Saint John the Baptist

Titian (Tiziano Vecellio)
Italian (c. 1488–1576)
16th century
1530s
Oil on panel
41 1/2 x 58 3/8 in. (105.4 x 148.3 cm) Framed: 54 1/2 x 71 1/8 x 3 3/4 in. (138.4 x 180.7 x 9.5 cm)
AP 1986.07
More than any other Renaissance master, Titian was acclaimed—in his own lifetime and for centuries thereafter—for his expressive handling of paint and rich use of color. Like his teachers Giovanni Bellini and Giorgione, Titian set many of his religious subjects in a pastoral landscape.
The Supper at Emmaus is Bassano's oil painting depicting Christ’s miraculous appearance after the Resurrection. In the act of blessing and breaking bread at the inn, Christ, who is seated beneath a velvet green canopy, reveals himself to two of his disciples
The Supper at Emmaus
The Supper at Emmaus
The Supper at Emmaus is Bassano's oil painting depicting Christ’s miraculous appearance after the Resurrection. In the act of blessing and breaking bread at the inn, Christ, who is seated beneath a velvet green canopy, reveals himself to two of his disciples

The Supper at Emmaus

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
c. 1538
Oil on canvas
39 5/8 x 50 5/8 in. (100.6 x 128.6 cm) Framed: 47 x 59 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (119.4 x 150.5 x 8.9 cm)
APx 1989.03
Jacopo Bassano was one of the most famous and influential masters of the late Renaissance in Italy, admired for his luminous color and sensitively observed incidents from everyday life.
Evening Landscape is a hanging paper scroll with an ink drawing of a dramatic mountain which dominates this painting rises out of the mist. Specific motifs, such as the flock of geese at the right, the temple nestled in mountain peaks, and the moon at the left, are references to a famous Chinese poetic theme
Evening Landscape
Evening Landscape
Evening Landscape is a hanging paper scroll with an ink drawing of a dramatic mountain which dominates this painting rises out of the mist. Specific motifs, such as the flock of geese at the right, the temple nestled in mountain peaks, and the moon at the left, are references to a famous Chinese poetic theme

Evening Landscape

Japan
Muromachi period (1392–1573)
c. 1540
Hanging scroll; ink and light color on paper
11 7/16 x 18 3/16 in. (29 x 46.2 cm)
AP 1969.15
The dramatic mountain which dominates this painting rises out of the mist, placing the foreground path and distant peaks in perspective.
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar is Bassano's oil portrait of a Franciscan Friar.  The skull at the bottom right of the composition is a reminder of the vanity of earthly life, supports the contemplative aspect of the friar’s piety. A pen holder hangs from the rope at his waist, while his left hand is held up in a gesture of benediction.
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar
Portrait of a Franciscan Friar is Bassano's oil portrait of a Franciscan Friar.  The skull at the bottom right of the composition is a reminder of the vanity of earthly life, supports the contemplative aspect of the friar’s piety. A pen holder hangs from the rope at his waist, while his left hand is held up in a gesture of benediction.

Portrait of a Franciscan Friar

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
c. 1540–42
Oil on canvas
31 11/16 x 27 3/16 in. (80.5 x 69 cm) Framed: 48 3/4 x 44 3/4 x 3 5/8 in. (123.8 x 113.7 x 9.2 cm)
AP 1997.02
In this imposing portrait, Jacopo Bassano applies a vigorous and sharply focused naturalism to portray the distinctive features as well as the spiritual temperament and preoccupations of an unidentified Franciscan friar.
Saint John the Baptist is a statuette of the saint in which the left hand comes to the figure’s chest rather than being raised.
Saint John the Baptist
Saint John the Baptist
Saint John the Baptist is a statuette of the saint in which the left hand comes to the figure’s chest rather than being raised.

Saint John the Baptist

Italian (Florentine)
16th century
16th century
c. 1590
Gilt bronze
22 5/8 in. (57.5 cm)
AP 1999.01
Saint John the Baptist is the patron saint of Florence. This statuette may have adorned a baptismal font in one of the churches of that city. In style, it recalls the works of the fifteenth-century sculptor Michelozzo di Bartolomeo.
Saint John the Baptist
Saint John the Baptist

Saint John the Baptist

Italian (Florentine)
16th century
16th century
c. 1590
Gilt bronze
22 5/8 in. (57.5 cm)
AP 1999.01
Saint John the Baptist is the patron saint of Florence. This statuette may have adorned a baptismal font in one of the churches of that city. In style, it recalls the works of the fifteenth-century sculptor Michelozzo di Bartolomeo.
The Adoration of the Magi
The Adoration of the Magi

The Adoration of the Magi

Jacopo Bassano (Jacopo dal Ponte)
Italian (c. 1510–1592)
16th century
after 1555
Oil on jasper
7 1/4 x 5 1/2 in. (18.4 x 14 cm) Framed: 12 3/4 x 11 x 1 5/8 in. (32.4 x 27.9 x 4.1 cm)
AG 1990.01
The subject of the Adoration of the Magi, along with the Adoration of the Shepherds, occupies pride of place in Jacopo Bassano’s repertory.
Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan
Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan

Portrait of Doge Pietro Loredan

Tintoretto (Jacopo Robusti)
Italian (1518–1594)
16th century
1567–70
Oil on canvas
49 5/8 x 41 15/16 in. (126 x 106.6 cm) Framed: 57 1/2 x 48 3/4 x 4 1/2 in. (146.1 x 123.8 x 11.4 cm)
AP 1986.08
A prolific master of religious and historical works, as well as portraits, Tintoretto developed a rapid, often impetuous manner of painting that was both expressive and expedient.
The Canying Hall is a paper hanging scroll  thought to depict the artist's own villa. A scholar plays the qin (Chinese lute) for his guest within a walled enclosure, while nearby a servant can be seen tending chrysanthemums.
The Canying Hall
The Canying Hall
The Canying Hall is a paper hanging scroll  thought to depict the artist's own villa. A scholar plays the qin (Chinese lute) for his guest within a walled enclosure, while nearby a servant can be seen tending chrysanthemums.

The Canying Hall

Lu Zhi
Chinese (1496–1576)
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
1572
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
54 3/4 x 27 1/2 in. (139 x 69.9 cm)
AP 1981.15
During the Ming dynasty (1368–1644), the city of Suzhou became the center for a group of painters known as the Wu school. Lu Zhi was distinguished among these artists for an eclectic style that combined elements from both the amateur (literati) and professional traditions.
The side of, Shallow Bowl, is deeply cracked, but tea connoisseurs admired its unusual pink color which was produced from a light coating of iron oxide.
Shallow Bowl
Shallow Bowl
The side of, Shallow Bowl, is deeply cracked, but tea connoisseurs admired its unusual pink color which was produced from a light coating of iron oxide.

Shallow Bowl

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
Late 16th century
Stoneware with red and gray glaze (Shino ware)
H. 2 in. (5.1 cm); Diam.6 5/16 in. (16 cm)
APx 1976.09
Shino, a collective term for pottery wares covered with a thick white feldspar glaze, was one of the most radiant developments in Japanese ceramics.
Water Jar (Mizusashi) is a stoneware jar with wood-ash glaze, sturdy shape, and warm natural finish.
Water Jar (Mizusashi)
Water Jar (Mizusashi)
Water Jar (Mizusashi) is a stoneware jar with wood-ash glaze, sturdy shape, and warm natural finish.

Water Jar (Mizusashi)

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
late 16th century
Stoneware with wood-ash glaze (Bizen ware)
8 1/4 x 8 11/16 in. (20.9 x 22.1 cm)
AP 1973.01
The Bizen kilns near the town of Imbe in Okayama prefecture are known to have been active since the thirteenth century.
Wine Flask is a simple, conservative, yet striking wood vessel with broad, softly rounded shoulders curving to a sharp edge that sets off the extreme slope of the body to the narrow waist and broad, flat foot.
Wine Flask
Wine Flask
Wine Flask is a simple, conservative, yet striking wood vessel with broad, softly rounded shoulders curving to a sharp edge that sets off the extreme slope of the body to the narrow waist and broad, flat foot.

Wine Flask

Japan
Momoyama period (1573–1615)
late 16th or early 17th century
Wood with black and red lacquer (Negoro ware)
11 3/4 x 8 3/4 in. (29.9 x 22.3 cm)
AP 1981.16
Negoro lacquerwares constitute a special group of simple food-serving utensils that are distinctive for their solid, cinnabar red finish and austere, functional forms.
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan is a paper hanging scroll which depicts a tall, narrow landscape crowded with wooded mountains, winding paths, torrents, and leafy trees executed in ink and pale colors.
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan
Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan is a paper hanging scroll which depicts a tall, narrow landscape crowded with wooded mountains, winding paths, torrents, and leafy trees executed in ink and pale colors.

Landscape in the Style of Dong Yuan

Wen Jia
Chinese (1501–1583)
Ming dynasty (1368–1644)
1577
Hanging scroll; ink and light colors on paper
65 3/4 x 20 1/2 in. (167 x 52 cm)
AP 1980.01
Wen Jia, a recognized poet, critic, and connoisseur of painting, was the second son of Wen Zhengming (1470–1559), one of the literati artists of the Wu school in Suzhou during the Ming dynasty (1368–1644).

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