Permanent Collection

Pair of Winged Deities
Pair of Winged Deities

Pair of Winged Deities

Assyria (Iraq)
Reign of Ashurnasirpal II (883–859 B.C.)
c. 874-860 B.C.
Gypsum
a: 36 1/4 x 27 9/16 in. (92 x 70 cm) b: 35 11/16 x 28 15/16 in. (90.7 x 73.5 cm)
AP 1981.04 a,b
The Northwest Palace of Ashurnasirpal II (reigned 883–859 b.c.) at Nimrud (ancient Kalhu) is the earliest of the surviving royal residences of the Assyrian kings, lavishly decorated with monumental gateway figures and reliefs, whose discovery in the mid-nineteenth century created a sensation through
Jar with Stamped Decoration
Jar with Stamped Decoration

Jar with Stamped Decoration

China, probably Jiangxi province
Eastern Zhou dynasty (770–221 B.C.)
7th–4th century B.C.
High-fired earthenware
H. 10 3/8 in. (26.4 cm); Diam. 15 3/4 in. (40 cm)
AP 1996.06
The ceramics of the early first millennium B.C. from Jiangxi province in central China are characterized by stamped or impressed geometric designs on high-fired earthenwares, predominantly on vessels of simple forms with high shoulders, short necks, and broad mouths.
Cylinder Seal with King Holding Two Lions
Cylinder Seal with King Holding Two Lions

Cylinder Seal with King Holding Two Lions

Persia (Iran)
Achaemenian period (539–331 B.C.)
c. 5th century B.C. (reign of Darius)
Chalcedony
H. 1 3/16 in. (3 cm); Diam. 5/8 in. (1.6 cm)
AP 2001.05
This seal shows a bearded king holding lions aloft by their hind legs, standing atop a pair of human-headed sphinxes. On either side of this group is a standing archer, holding a bow and arrows in his hands, standing on a winged griffin.
Standing Female
Standing Female

Standing Female

Cyprus
Archaic period (700–475 B.C.)
c. 500–475 B.C.
Sandy limestone
18 9/16 x 5 1/16 x 2 1/2 in. (47.2 x 12.8 x 6.4 cm)
AG 1980.02
This serene columnar sculpture may represent a goddess or votary. Conceived frontally with a flat back, the figure holds a flower to her breast with her right hand, while grasping another object at her left side. She wears an elegantly designed headcloth and necklace of Near Eastern origin.
Wreathed Male Head
Wreathed Male Head

Wreathed Male Head

Cyprus
Archaic period (700–475 B.C.)
c. 500–475 B.C.
Sandstone
6 5/16 x 4 15/16 in. (16 x 12.5 cm)
AP 1972.05
Crowned with a laurel wreath symbolic of victory, this small head was carved during the most creative period of Cypriot art, when the island of Cyprus was a mercantile crossroads between East and West.
Red-Figure Lekythos Showing Eros in the Role of Archer
Red-Figure Lekythos Showing Eros in the Role of Archer

Red-Figure Lekythos Showing Eros in the Role of Archer

Attributed to Brygos Painter
Greek (active c. 490–470 B.C.)
Late Archaic period (500–480 B.C.)
c. 490–480 B.C.
Terracotta
H. 13 1/2 in. (34.3 cm); Diam. 5 5/16 in. (13.5 cm)
AP 1984.16
The image on this lekythos (one-handled oil jug) marks the earliest known appearance of Eros, the god of love, in his role of archer. It predates by forty to fifty years the representation of the subject on one of the east metopes of the Parthenon.
Red-Figure Cup Showing the Death of Pentheus (exterior) and a Maenad (interior)
Red-Figure Cup Showing the Death of Pentheus (exterior) and a Maenad (interior)

Red-Figure Cup Showing the Death of Pentheus (exterior) and a Maenad (interior)

Douris (painter)
Greek (active c. 500–460 B.C.)
Late Archaic period (500–480 B.C.)
c. 480 B.C.
Terracotta
H. 5 in. (12.7 cm); Diam. 11 1/2 in. (29.2 cm)
AP 2000.02
On the exterior of this cup, one of the finest surviving vases of the early Classical period, we witness the gruesome death of Pentheus, a mythical king of Thebes who had offended the god Dionysos by denying his divinity and forbidding his worship.
Jar with Ribbed Decoration
Jar with Ribbed Decoration

Jar with Ribbed Decoration

China, probably Zhejiang province
Warring States period (475–221 B.C.)
4th century B.C.
Stoneware with yellowish green glaze
H. 9 5/8 in. (24.5 cm); Diam.14 1/4 in. (36.2 cm)
AP 1995.08
From the end of the Warring States period through the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 220), glazed stoneware vessels were routinely produced in northern Zhejiang and southern Jiangsu provinces to serve as funerary storage jars.
Young Female Attendant
Young Female Attendant

Young Female Attendant

Greece, Attica (?)
Late Classical period (400–300 B.C.)
c. 340–330 B.C.
Marble
46 x 18 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (116.9 x 47 x 26.7 cm)
AP 1972.03
This sculpture is probably one of a group of votary figures that originally accompanied the statue of a goddess. Although it dates from a century later than the maidens from the famous frieze of the Parthenon, it shares their ceremonious and solemn air.
Head
Head

Head

Africa, Northern Nigeria, Nok culture
c. 500 B.C.–A.D. 500
c. 285 B.C.–A.D. 515
Terracotta
12 3/4 x 6 3/4 x 7 in. (32.4 x 17.2 x 17.8 cm)
AP 1996.04
This unadorned yet elegant head represents a strain of Nok art differentiated from the typically more energized Nok style, perhaps of a type produced in another area. Sculpted in the round, it is most likely broken at the neck from a full figure.
Horse and Rider
Horse and Rider

Horse and Rider

China, probably Shaanxi province
Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9)
2nd–1st century B.C.
Earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
22 5/8 x 21 1/2 x 6 5/8 in. (57.5 x 54.6 x 16.8 cm)
AP 1994.07
Tombs of the Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D.. 220) were typically furnished with model figures and other objects believed to be necessary for a safe journey to the afterlife.
Male Figure
Male Figure

Male Figure

Africa, Northern Nigeria, Nok culture
c. 500 B.C.–A.D. 500
c. 195 B.C.–A.D. 205
Terracotta
19 1/2 x 8 3/4 x 6 5/8 in. (49.5 x 22.2 x 16.8 cm)
AP 1996.03
Nok terracottas are the earliest known sculptures from ancient Nigeria. Sculptures of this kind were first discovered in 1943 by Bernard Fagg near the northern Nigerian village of Nok, after which the culture that produced them was named.
Cocoon-Shaped Jar with Cloud-Scroll Design
Cocoon-Shaped Jar with Cloud-Scroll Design

Cocoon-Shaped Jar with Cloud-Scroll Design

China, possibly Luoyang, Henan province
Western Han dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 9)
late 2nd or early 1st century B.C.
Earthenware with painted polychrome decoration
11 1/2 x 13 1/8 x 9 1/4 in. (29.2 x 33.3 x 23.5 cm)
AP 1995.02
This handsome jar would have served as a mortuary object (mingqi), placed in a tomb as a substitute for the more valuable bronze and lacquer vessels used in daily life.
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)
Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)

Head of an Athlete (Apoxyomenos)

Hellenistic or Roman
probably after Lysippos (Greek, c. 365-c. 310 B.C.)
c. 2nd–1st century B.C.
Cast bronze
11 1/2 × 8 1/4 × 10 3/4 in. (29.2 × 21 × 27.3 cm) Weight: 36.6 lb. (16.6 kg)
AP 2000.03 a,b
This exceptionally fine and rare head comes from the statue of an athlete shown scraping oil from his naked body with a strigil after exercising. The lips were originally overlaid with copper, and the eyes inlaid with stone, glass, and metal.
Crouching Aphrodite
Crouching Aphrodite

Crouching Aphrodite

Roman, based on a Greek original of c. 3rd–2nd century B.C.
Late Republican–Early Imperial (1st cent. B.C.–2nd cent. A.D.)
c. 50 B.C.–A.D. 140
Marble
25 x 13 7/8 x 19 3/8 in. (63.5 x 35.3 x 49.2 cm)
AP 1967.09
According to the primal Greek myth recounted in Hesiod’s Theogony (genealogy of the gods), Aphrodite, the goddess of love, was born of the aphros, the foam created when Kronos threw the genitals of his father, Uranos (Heaven), into the sea.
Head of Meleager
Head of Meleager

Head of Meleager

After Skopas
Greek (c. 370–330 B.C.)
Late Republican–Early Imperial (1st cent. B.C.–2nd cent. A.D.)
50 B.C.–A.D. 100
Marble
11 3/4 x 8 x 9 1/2 in. (29.8 x 20.3 x 24.1 cm)
AP 1967.10
This head is from a Roman copy of a full-length statue by the famed fourth-century-B.C. Greek sculptor Skopas. It showed the mythological hero Meleager with a hunting dog and the head of the Kalydonian boar.

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